Newspaper Archive of
Catholic Northwest Progress
Seattle, Washington
December 28, 1962     Catholic Northwest Progress
PAGE 5     (5 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 5     (5 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 28, 1962
 

Newspaper Archive of Catholic Northwest Progress produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Friday, Dec. 28, 1962 THE PROGRESSm5 iii:::. ,::, :,,.:., :. .. ........ John Eckhart , Evolutionists vs. Genesis By JOHN J. ECKHART Science of Today and the Problems of Genesis, by Rev. Patrick O'Con- nell, The Radio Replies Press Society, $3.75. D ONE f the many gd things that can be said about the author of this yew interesting book is that he does not and will not offer blind sacrifice at the paleontological altar of Father Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. This is a healthy sign in an age that leaps to suck up the qw' slightest shreds of evidence that will contradict special creation for man and prove that we are either an evolutionaT step up from the apes, or, that we and the apes share a common an- cestor. It is certainly academically chic these days to claim full understanding and apprecia- tion, as well as complete ac- cord, with the evolutionists, be they Catholic or atheist. The Reverend O'Connell is not as quick to accept "the word" as it is passed along in texts written for and by material evolutionists. On the basis of known for- geries such as the Piltdown Man and spurious entries like the Peking Man, we strive mightily to show that man is not such a big deal, that God did not especially create him at a time and place in geologi- cal history, and that the Mosaic concept of creation is a fairy- tale for the stupid Jewish herds. men that wandered the deserts of the near East. This book is a masterpiece of logic and synthesis. It is not written by a narrow academician, but rather by a ve T sensible and intelligent appraiser of the mind and literature of God and man. He believes the Bible to be Truth, he does not believe that modern science has, as yet, contravened the word of God, and he does not believe the dis- covery of what is obviously the cranial covering of a baboon to be uncontradictable testimony of polygenesis. Book II of this same volume pursues the problems of the De- luge and the antiquity of man on earth. He stands on firm ground as even the most unreligious an- thropologists a n d paleontolo- gists admit to a period in his- tory anterior to the advent of the Cromagnon (modern) man and immediately posterior to the Mousterian dolichocephalic Neanderthal wherein there are no evidences of human life. They even have a term for this period. It is called "the Hiatus." In most instances it is a layer of silt. It could also be called "The Deluge." Agree or not. This is a well planned book, a well written book, a careful book. Father O'connell h i m s e 1 f would ask for complete agree- ment but, if he does not ac- complish this with all readers, he at least makes a convinc- ing plea for prudence and care in evaluating the extravagant claims of the evolutionists. Plus XII and Technology, edited by Rev. Leo Haigerty, The Bruce Publishing Co., $4.75. NOother pope in the istory of the Church was as aware and cognizant of the tremen- dous scieniific advances of his age as was Plus XII. In his many pronouncements, addresses and writings concern- ing science and technology he constantly strived for harmony, the harmony of continuing work being done in science and tech- nology with the proper place- ment of science in the philoso- phy of Christian man. In a word, he Warned against making a sacred white cow of science. His warnings were not ill placed. The 34 addresses to vari- ous technological and scientific groups c a 11 e d for Sobering, calm reflections on technology. He was never negative, but in fact in favor of those steps that advanced the knowledge of our material world and eased the work burden of man. But he could see the direc- tions that technology w e r e taking as a substitute for a God-oriented philosophy. This book relates these warnings in his own words. Read them. Feature Films Bellingham KVDS-TV Channel 12 Seattle KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 On Television KING-TV (NBC) Channel 5 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel 11 KTVW-TV Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobjectionable for General Patronage; A-II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-III--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults; B--Morally Objectoinable in Part for All; C--Condemned; SG-Separate Classification; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films be[ore being shown on tele- vision are edited to conJorm to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, objectionable Darts contained in the original plot may be deleted in the television version and thus the original Legion rating may not be entirely correct.) SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29 9:00 p.m.KOMO-TVVoung People .................................. A.I 2:00 p.m.--KING-TV--Forbldden Island .................................... e 2:30 p.m.KING-TV--The Get Away .................................. A-II 3:00 p.m.KiRO-TV--The Lone Cowboy ............................... NR 4:00 p.m.KTNT-TV--Tiger Shark .................................... NR $:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Body Snatcher ...................................... 8 $:00 p.m.KTVW-TV--BodyguarO ....................................... A-I| 9:00 p.m.KING-TV--Desperate Siege ................................. Adl t0:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--The Long Search ........................ , ....... NR 11:00 p.m.KIRO-TV--Oouble Indemnity ............................... A-II 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Hobson's Choice ................................. A-II 11:15 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Above and Beyond ............................. A-II 11:35 p.m.--KING-TV--Phfff ............................................... a SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30 12 Noon--Music for Madame .............................................. A-I 2:00 p.m.KVO$-TV--Innocent Sinners ................................ NR 2:00 p.m.--KING-TV--BIossoms in the Dust .......................... A-tl 2:30 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Remember the Night ............................ A.II 4:00 p.m,--KOMO-TV--Doomed Battalion .............................. NR 4:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Llttle Lord Fauntleroy .......................... A-I 6:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Song of Kong .................................... NR 7:30 p.m.--KTNT-TVThonk Your Lucky Stars ....................... A-II 8:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Super Sleuth .................................... A-! 5:00 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Subway in the Sky ............................... a 9:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--Murder on the Waterfront ...................... A-II 11:35 p.m.--KING-TV--aroodway Serenade .................................. MONDAY, DECEMBER 31 9:30 o.m.KOMO-TVWoman In the Dark ............................ A-II 10:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--There Goes the Groom ........................ A-I 1:30 p.m.KTVW-TV--Sea Devils ....................................... A-I 2:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--Merry Frlnks .................................... NR 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV---Giri Crazy ......................................... A-I 5:30 p.m.KVOS-TV--The Vanquished ................................. A-il 6:00 p.m.KTVW-TV--Stand n ....................................... A-I 10:00 p.m.KTVW-TV--Montana Belie ................................... e 10:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--Rhopsody In alue ............................... A-II 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Father Was a Fullhack ..................... A-It 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Aff the Brothers Were Valiant ................. A-II 1:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--Forelgn Correspondent ........................ A-II TUESDAY, JANUARY 1 10:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--Professlonal Sweetheart ........................ NR 1:00 ).m.--KTVW-TV--Coreer ........................................... A-I 2:30 ).m.--KTNT-TV--CowboF Quarterback ............................. A-I .$:30 ).m.KVOS-TV--Lody on a Train ............................... A-H 6:00 ,.m.--KTVW-TV--aetrayal from the East ....................... A-ll I0:30 ).m.KTNT-TV--Coney Island ....................................... B 10:00 ,.m.--KTVW-TV--Woman of ihe Town ............................ A-II 11:00 ,.m.--KVO$-TV--Aresenlc and Old Lace ........................ A-II 11:30 Lm.--KOMO-TV--A Guy, A Girl and A Pal ..................... NR 1:00 o.m.--KTVW-TV--A retie Fury ...................................... A-I WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 9:30 a.m.--KOMO-TV--BIondie Johnson .................................. NR 10:00 o.m.--KTVW-TV--Son QuenT;n ..................................... A.II |1:3 ).m.KIRO-TV--Eosy Come, Easy Go ..... ....................... A-II 1:30 3.m.--KTVW-TV--The Seventh Victim .............................. e 2:30 =.m,--KTNT-TV--Two Against the World ......................... B 3:30 ).m.KING-TV--Florion ............................................ A-II 5:30 3.m.--KVOS-TV--Chinn Gate ....................................... Adl $:00 3.m.--KTVW.TV--Call Out the Marines .............................. B 10:0(I 3.m.--KTVW-TV--Mexican Spltflre's Elephant .................... A-II 10:30 .m.--KTNT-TV--Cold is Where You Find if ...................... A-I 11:00 p.m.-.-KVOS-TV--Nora Prentlss ....................................... B 11:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Speclal Agent .................................... A-I t1:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Iroquois Trnll .................................... NR t:00a.rn.--KTVW-TV--Dote with the Falcon ......................... A-II THURSDAY, JANUARY 3 9:3g a.m.--KOMO-TV--The Lone Wolf In Meleo .................... A-II I0:00 a.m.--KTVW.TV--The Saint Strikes Bad ....................... A-II 1:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Star of Midnight ............................... NR 2:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Love, Honor and Behave ......................... B 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV--B. F.'s Daughter (Part I) ....................... A.II $:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Hangman's Knot ................................ A.II 6:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Out of the Past ............................... A-II 6:30 p,m.KIRO-TV--South Sea Woman . e e46 t 6ot/  I0:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Will any Gentleman '.'.'-.'.'.'-'--.'..'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.....'.'NR 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Race Street ................................... A-II 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Night of the Hunter .............................. B 11:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--eod Lands ...................................... A-I 11:30 p.m.KOMO.TV--Day Break ....................................... B 1:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--Fugitlves for a Night ............................ A-I FRIDAY, JANUARY 4 9:/0 a.m.--KOMO-TV--Stranger In Town ............................. A-I I0:00 o.m.--KTVW-TV--Son of Kong ..................................... NR 1:30 p.m.KTVW.TV--Race Street .................................. A-If 2:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Toxl ............................................. A-I 3:30 p.m,--KING-TV--B. F.'s Daughter (Port tl) ..................... A-II S:30 p.m.KVOS-TV--Moltese Falcon .................................. A-II 6:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--$econd Chance ................................. A-II 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Annopolls Sal0te ................................ A-1 10:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Mork of Zorro ................................ A-II 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Clook and Dogger ............................ A-II 11:30 p,m.--KOMO-TV--House of Strangers ............................ A-H 1:00a.m.KTVW-TV--Affolr with a Stranger ....................... A-II This Rovl.w ,s Spon00.S b, Caholic Gifts & Church Goods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasent shopping atmosphere with o select variety of religious gifts. 607 Union St,, Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 / I Your Story In Book Of Life By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SHEEN OW MANY ever read the Book of is written on those books. May it be inscribed Book manifested of the Apocalypse, the last book in the of Life that you your love of Crucified Savior by denying your- of the Bible? St. John tells us that they the self to Faith others in mission who read it are blessed. Take but one verse in give His to which John describes the throne of God: lands! "Before this throne in my vision, the dead GOD LOVE YOU to Mrs. B.Y. for $10 must come, great and little alike; and the books were opened. Another book too was opened, the book of life. And the dead were judged by their deeds, as the books recorded them."--(Apocalypse 20:12) But what will these books be? For one thing, they will be the unerring memo T of God. Noth- ing is forgotten by Him; not one passing thought eludes His notice or escapes His mind. The books will also be our own memory, for nothing that we have ever done is without a registry on our souls. A word, a look, a sound or a song may recall deeds and thoughts of a generation past, making the whole of our lives rush back in an instant. Then it is that we see ourselves with horror or joy. Each day we are writing our judgment through our deeds. Character can be read now. It comes out of the eyes, the look and tone of the voice, in the open hands, the clenched fist and the grossness of the body. And it is not the evil alone that is recorded; it is the good. Not even the least work done for God and His Church will be forgotten. Start the new year by straightening out your accounts. If you have failed, make amends. If you have not practiced your Faith, give alms to the Holy Father that He may send a missionary to give Faith to a pagan. If you have not supported the works of the Church, build a church in Africa or Asia. Someday the books will be opened. Friends and flatterers can do nothing for you then, for your name "'To thank St. ]ude for favors received, I want the Holy Father to have this for His missions.".., to Mrs. L.B. for $5 "I made this money selling homemade bread, eggs and a few chickens. This is a small way to help feed God's poor.".., to a Catholic Daughters group for $23 "Last month we held a "car wash" to help raise money for the missions. There are now lots of sparkling cars  may there be even more sparkling soulst.".., to Mr. and Mrs. G.F. for $40 "'We decided not to give each other presents thls year so that someone in the missions could hare the greatest gift--the Faith."... to K.R.H. for $25 "'I ant giving my Christ- mas bonus to the missions in hopes it will inspire others to do the same," A new year.., an old stow: two billion souls wandering in darkness because they have not found the Light of Christ. This coming year, resolve to say a Worldmission Rosary each day for the conversion of the world. Send your re- quest and an offering of $2 to The Society for the Propagation of the Faith, 366 5th Ave., New York 1, N.Y., and these multi-colored beads will remind you to pray for the Godless peoples of the world. Cut out  ealuma, pin yonr eacdfiee to it and mail it to Most R. Fulton ,I. Sheen, Nafienai Director M the Soeie0y for the Propa- gation of the Faith, IN $th Avenue, New York 1, N.Y., er yem' Archdiocesan Director, Rev. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle 4. Experience Is Man's Best Teacher (Continued from Page 1) year will be more auspicious than the last. As Lord Brron wrote: "The best of prophets o| the futu're is the past." Using this as a criterion, there appears little in the rec- ord to give rise to a feeling of joyful confidence. The most that can be said is that one may view the coming year with restrained optimism, bolstered with a belief that we have learned at least a few salutary lessons from our experience. This applies particularly to developments on the interna- tional level and our frequent bouts with Communists. Surveying the general scene the problem is not so much the losses sustained at the hands of the international conspiratorial enemy as the lack of strengthening the free world alliance. Friction among members of the Western powers does not augur well for the future--the altogether proper but strained relations with France, irritat- ing incidents with Britain, un- necessary provocations relating to both the internal and exter- nal affairs of West Germany and the disturbing disagree- ments in NATO. There is no common agree- ment among free world nations on the Congo and other areas of Africa, on Lads and other Far Eastern countries, or even on larger European questions. In the Western Hemisphere not only the rebuff suffered in Cuba but the disturbing trends in some Latin Ameri- can states indicate that the situation will be much the same for 1963. There are serious considera- tions not based on personal opinion nor preference, but on an objective analysis of the situation as it is. Any prognostication must be made not through the eyes of a seer but in the light of the irrevocable past. Hot Spots Reviewing in turn the still unresolved issues in scattered regions throughout the world, the most incendiary spot inter- SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29 7:30 p.m., Insight, KTVW-TV, Channel 13. "Face of Tyranny" compares the promise of Communism as concretized in the Russian Rev- olution of 1917 and articulated by Marx, Lenin and Stalin with its fulfillment in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30 8:30 a.m., Look Up and Live, KIRO-TV, Channel 7. The Burke Family Singers of Providence, R.I., are featured. Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Burke and their five boys and five girls will sing a selection of spirituals and folk and classi- cal songs. 4:00 p.m., Directions '63, KOMO- TV, Channel 4. A review of the first session of the Ecumenical Council will be featured. Appearing will be Msgr. George Higgins, director of the Social Action Department of the National Catholic Wel- fare Conference with three other men who were also pres- ent at the council. MONDAY, DECEMBER 31 7:15 p.m., St. Martin College News and Views, KGY-Radlo, Olympia. This Monday, Wednesday and Thursday newscast features col- lege news and values in the Olympia area. Moderator is Dick Hooper, public relations director of St. Martin Abbey. nationally is the Congo, where open warfare may break out at almost any moment. This is nothing new or un- expected, for the stage has been set by the UN for some months and action is immi- neat. The flareup of fighting Mon- day between some of the 17,000 UN forces stationed in the Congo and Katangese troops may shortly become the order of the day unless one side or the other is willing to moderate its position. Although everything seems to be quiet again at deadline, there seems to be no imme- diate prospect that either the UN or Katanga will voluntar- ily give ground and nothing in the way of a compromise is in sight. Such a plan, proposed by Un- der Secretary of State George C. McGhee several weeks ago when he returned from a fact- finding mission to Elizabeth- ville, was summarily rejected by the UN. McGhee's proposal, by the way, was by no means favorable to President Tshombe, but it had the merit at least of suggesting the basis for fur- ther discussions or even a com- promise. It is by no means easy to perceive what lles baek of the UN policy in the Congo. The recent propaganda to the effect that the Congo would be in danger of being taken over by the Communists un- less Tsbombe is coerced immediately into accepting union with Leopoldville on U Thant's terms, was patently absurd and contradietory. At this time a U.S. military mission is in Katanga and on Christmas Day Jonathan Dean, U.S. consul, and UN officials went to Elizabethville for what was said to be a top-level meet- ing with Katangese leaders. There can be no doubt but that the tightening of the UN blockade on Katanga, appar- ently designed to force the Katangese to fire the first shot and thus justify the UN troops to retaliate, will sooner or later precipitate a full-scale war. Cuba Next? The conscience of the nation was momentarily eased on the eve of Christmas when the first Cuban war prisoners from Cas- tro's dungeons began arriving in the U.S. The 1113 captives held for some months were released after Americans accepted the blackmail terms imposed by the Cuban bandit. Although it was generally believed that the pay-off would consist entirely of medicines, drugs and food, it now tran- spires that he also received a substantial cash payment which he also demanded. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Gem Lucius Clay and others for the past three weeks have been engaging in a fund- raising campaign which re- sulted in the collection of $2,9000,000 cash which Castro demanded as evidence of good faith. A check in that amount was drawn on the Royal Bank of Canada as a handsome Christmas gift for the Cuban dicta(or and his brigands. It seems that this was payment for 60 Cuban prisoners who were released last April. Although the operation was that of an informal committee, it did indirectly involve our government because adminis- tration officials were members of the committee. This is in- deed regrettable. There is no reason to believe, however, that government funds or supplies were involved in the ransom deal. Castro Reneges The nation could scarcely be- lieve its ears when it heard that Fidel Castro had promised to permit i000 close relatives of the ransomed prisoners to come to the U.S. as "a Christmas bonus." The general impression was that the Red dictator's heart had been mellowed by the Christmas spirit. He warned the hundreds of Cubans who immediately flocked to Ha- vana that while he was will- ing to let them go, he doubted that the U.S, would admit them. The numbers of relatives who surged in from all parts of the island became so great that they presented something of a problem. As might be expected, they were soon disillusioned, for Castro announced on Christmas Day that if they really wanted to go to the U.S. they would have to pay for the privilege. The penalty was forfeiture of their automobiles and their homes, if any, as well as the cost of all expenses of getting out of the country. Castro knows full well that the majority of these families own either or both of the items he has demanded and that they can be compelled to pay this exorbitant price or remain sep- arated from their loved ones who are now free on U.S. soil. They are even restricted in the amount of clothes they may take out of Cuba. The unfortunate mothers, wives and children are there- fore as truly captives merci- lessly held for blackmail as were the Cuban freedom fighters he captured at the Bay of Pigs. Encouraged by his success in getting his price for the release of 1113 prisoners of war, he then set this nefarious trap which has already com- promised many thousands of relatives. Either they pay the price and leave the country, or else they remain within Cuba as marked people. It might not be beyond this Communist government's perfidy to hold these rela- tives as pawns and try to wring further blaekmaii from or through the released pris- oners by threats of harm to their loved ones still in Cuba. Such tactics have been used by other Communist regimes. Perpetual Threat Emboldened by this fantastic achievement and having lost absolutely nothing from the Soviet missile episode, Castro undoubtedly will move to great- er depths of plotting against the U.S. Far from losing anything in recent months, his prestige has been heightened in direct proportion to the extent to which the U.S. has been hu- miliated. The UN has done absolutely nothing except to ease the So- viet Union off the hook and to lending prestige to Castro's government by taking him to task for none of his crimes. The Soviet Union has in no manner suffered, not even by having its influence or reputa- tion besmirched, even though it has refused to live up to its promises to the U.S. Persistent reports that of- fensive weaponry and even underground arsenals are still maintained in Cuba have not been refuted, and nobody ap- parently yet knows the extent to which this eonstitutos a terpetual danger to the U.S, Until Castro and his gang are eliminated once and for all the threat during 1963 will be- come even greater than it has been. India In Doubt After weeks of high-pitched excitement over Red China's invasion of India, news from that sector of the world ]s suddenly almost non-existent. The Red troops have not left, but apparently have dug in for the winter, whereas Indian troops are not pursuing the enemy nor advancing beyond the line set by the Reds. Instead, dispatches from New Delhi indicate that Nehru is expecting sharp inereases in all kinds of aid from the U.S. Yet, last week it was officially stated that India would remain neutral and not. aligu herself with any coun- try, whatever that might mean. This week, the Soviet Union again warned India against abandoning its neutrality policy. What India wants in addition to almost unlimited arms, or as much as the U.S. can pos- sibly provide, is American dollars. Here in brief, as it was revealed in the Indian cap- ital this week, are Nehru's needs: Weapons and supplies to re-equip the Indian army of 600,000 troops and to support hundreds of thousands of new soldiers. Capital goods to increase essential production, especially ordnance output. V. K. Krishna Menon used these factories to manufacture coffee percolators and such ware when he was Defense Minister. Transportation, power, raw materials and spare parts to operate essential industries. The Indian government has admitted that it can expect very little in either economic or military aid from the Commu- nist bloc. Tllerefore, the play is to get Uncle Sam to under- write India's economy as well as to provide her miiltary de- fenses. The interesting thing about all these requests for aid is that India is exceedingly vague about her economic or military programs. Her entire interest seems to be to obtain all the assistance the traffic will bear. Shuns U.S. Advice On the other hand, New Delhi takes a dim view of the good offices of the U.S. in striv- ing to bring Pakistan and India together relative to a settle- ment of the Kashmir question. After 15 years of obstinately refusing to meet with Paki- stan or to hold a plebiscite in Kashmir as she had prom- ised, India finally thawed under the impact of the re- cent Red Chinese aggression and her appeal for military aid from the U.S. Now she pretends that U.S. efforts to bring about peace- able relations between India and Pakistan is a diplomatic affront, even though the issue ]s m no way tied in with U.S. military or economic aid. Delegations of the two coun- tries will meet this week at Rawalpindi, Pakistan, for their first session, with no agenda or preconditions for the talks. At the moment only slender hopes are being entertained for an early settlemenL The way it looks from here, shrewd old Nehru is playing games. We doubt that he is sincere in his apparently changed attitude toward the U.S. or in his loud-spoken con- demnation of Red China. And he still loves the Soviets, with or without aid. 'We Are Not Made To Be Lone Wolves' By Ray. Jah. L. Thomas, S.J. Assolote Protessor, St. Louis Uelversity We have just finished our annual school retreat, and as usual, we were urged not to become mere "conformists," or to act out of "'human respect." 1're always found this last term very confusing because nobody ever bothers to explain it. We just can't avoid paying attention to what others think of us. How tong will you be welcome in a group if you don't go along with them? Most of us aren't made to be lone woh, es, yet that's what you'll be i/ you don't cooperate. Some of the instructions we get don't seem very practical, or am I missing the point? INCE I DIDN'T make this retreat, I can't answer your last question. However, I think I know the point your instructor was trying to make in regard to human respect, and it's a point well worth making. Perhaps his treatment took too much for granted, and as sometimes happens when discussing spiritual matters, employed terms that remain meaningful only for those specially trained in religion. At any rate, it's clear the instruction didn't get across to you and conseque0tly merits further discussion. By human respect we mean a particular type of fear, a fear of criticism or ridicule that induces a person to neglect doing his duty or seeking a moral good. In this sense, it is op- posed to the general moral virtue of fortitude which gives one the strength to tackle and endure difficult things. Hence, the term, "human respect," has tra- ditionally been used by spiritual writers to sig- FATHER nify wrongly motivated or ill-grounded fear. THOMAS When we blame a person for acting out of human respect, we imply not only that he acted primarily or merely out of concern for what others might think of him, but also that the expected criticism of these "others" was not based on sound moral principles. We must carefully distinguish the cowardly fear of criticism associated with "human respect" from the healthy fear of the just criticimn of others that we all should experience. This salutary fear operates as a self-conscious, motivating awareness that if we do wrong, our good reputation will suffer; that is, others will justly blame us and we will lose their valued esteem. Perhaps the source of your confusion is that you tend to associate the term "human respect" with this healthy fear of just criticism. Significant Role In Human Affairs ECAUSE the reality to which this term applies has practical implications for moral life, let us analyze it in greater detail. Human respect plays a very significant role in human affairs, for men are social by nature. To be sure, as human persons we possess an independent, autonomous "self," but we are not auto- sufficient. We stand in need of others and are consequently profoundly affected by the kinds of relationships we maintain with them. More important, our conceptions of ourselves, our self-lmages, are formed and conditioned by what others think of us, or at least, by what we think others think of us. Concern for the esteem of others, therefore, is an essentially human trait, and it is precisely in this gap between our self- images and the images we present to others, between what we are to ourselves and what we wish to appear to others, that the roots of the problems associated with human respect are to be found. If our serf-images are poorly developed, or if we are dis- satisfied with them, we will seek consolation in the images we present to others, with the result that we will try to preserve and enhance these images by conforming our conduct to what others may approve. In this connection it should be noted that not all "others" are equally important. Only those whose esteem we seek; for example, our parents during childhood, our "gang" or peer group during adolescence, our professional "colleagues, business asso- ciate, or social "pace-setters" during maturity will be significant in this regard. Moreover, concern for what these significant others may think will vaT, being most influential during childhood and adolescence when our self-images are normally least adequate or developed. Inteqrated Philosophy Developed N the basis of this analysis, we may conclude that two related measures are of primary importance in overcom- ing human respect. We must develop an integrated philosophy of llfe, including mature life-goals, standards, and satisfactory self-images; and we must be careful to select signifieant "others" with similar ideals, so that concern for their respect will be a salutary force rather than a hindrance to moral growth. I fully agree with you, we cannot avoid paying attention to what others may think of us. Nevertheless, as followers of Christ, we are bound to evaluate their criticisms within a framework of Christian moral principles and then have the courage to do what is fight. But this is possible only if we have personally developed a balanced philosophy of life, motivated by a sense of personal commitment and loyalty to Christ. I also agree that we are not made to be lone wolves. As a Christian this means that you select your friends, your "significant others," with due attention to the values that guide their judgments. Readers Editor, The Progress: This is a middle class voice crying 'way out in the wilder- ness in response to your recent Legion Of Write ] editorial asking w h e r e we were? It is true, as you say, that this economic bracket, as such, was not represented at the birthplace of the Divine In- fant, but the fact that, in later years, the first head of the D infant church, and the men ecency who were to be its first bishops Listed here are ratings of the were chosen from the laboring latest films received by the No- ranks, which we would now tionai Legion of Decency. call the middle Class, leads one First-Run Movies to believe that perhaps the representatives at the crib Showing In Seattle were apportioned on some basis A-I--Jumbo, It's Only Money. other than economic. A-2--Mutiny on the Bounty, I find Bishop Fulton Sheen's Barabbas. solution to the dilemna, in The B--Gypsy. Divine Romance, much more Other Movies enlightening: "There were only two Currently Showing classes of men who heard the A-I--Marco Polo, Tarzan Goes cry that night: Shepherds to India, Gigot, Mr. Hobbs and Wise Men. Shepherds: Takes a Vacation, Tarzan's those who know they know Fight for Life, Five Weeks nothing. Wise Men: those in a Balloon, Hatari. who know they do not know A-2--Two-Way Stretch, Rear everything." Could it be that those who Window, G i r I s Girls Girls, fell heir to a few grains of-the Geronimo. wisdom of the sages combined A-&--Double Bunk, The Seventh with much of the simple faith Seal, Wild Strawberries, of the shepherds were repre- Apartacus. sented at the crib by both. B--Tunnel of Love, Waltz of the groups? -- or maybe by the Toreadors. carpenter Foster Father? Condemned--Port of Desire. MRS. BERNARD KAISER Separate Classifieation--Di- 907 17th St. vorce, Italian Style. Washougal, Wash.