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Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 25, 1964     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 25, 1964
 

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Friday, Dec. 25, 1964 THE PROGRESS---5 ARTS BROWSING Pop Goes the Nothing OT long ago we were subject to the vaga- ries of the Northwest Annual. This is the all-out pro- vincial art show at the Volun- teer Park municipal art mu- seum, which while mighty interesting, still points up more weakness t h a n strength. This year we were inflicted with whet was more than our share of "Pop" art. As a matter of aesthetic fact, we are being deluged in general with way more than our share of this new pseudo- art form. It laughs at us from the pages of "Life" and "Time," and it smirks from the walls of more and more otherwise sensible galleries. "Pop" art is a funny name for a funny form of creative ex- pression. At least, I would hope someone is laughing, or the joke becomes too macabre. For those among us fortu- nate enough to have missed the vacuous blah of pop art, let the following suffice. The dullness started in New York. Where else? The "Pop" frauds concern themselves with banality, which is ac- ceptable, but they concern themselves in a banal man- ner. They reproduce, at times with neat exactitude, those things which they say are crass and most symbolic of our mileau. This includes comic books, hamburgers, wheels of fortune, and beer eans. By JOHN J. ECKHART today, at the hands of the ni- hilistic dadaists. Good (Moholy-Negy, Pollock, Piccaso, Kandinsky, and Utril- Io, to name a few giants) and bad Tobey, DuChamp, Graves and Lichenstien to mention a few fraudulent peewees) have passed through the galleries, and eft has survived, and grown. It will survive "pop" art. In the first place, the pop artist is entirely too taken with explaining why his art is valid comment. He realizes himself that it cannot speak for itself, and he is correct. A large exactness of a soup can says nothing, good, bad or indifferent. To explain this by explaining that a society that produces jillions of such cans can say nothing, says nothing. It's a kind of a trap. which the greedy gallery owner can spring on the gullible with profit. This big nothing can hypno- tize, but under no set of pos- sible circumstances, is the function of art to hypnotize. It can cause talk, but it is the self conscious kind of talk we use to cover an overwhelmiug urge to giggle. It is big, but the bigness is restricted to mere hugeness, canvasses stretching five by 11 feet, sold I suppose by the square foot. In a word. it is a fraud. All of the artistic quackery Now any son of Adem can in the world cannot change make any social comment he the basic truth. We are being wants, in any way compelled, cheated. We are being ceated But we need not accept the outrage that this is art. Can we criticise without ap- propriate definitions? I think so, at least by implied defini- tions. The mere fact that the pop perpetrators (craftsmen of varying degrees of proficiency, not artists) refuse to define what they circumscribe, cir- cumvent, and otherwise cir- cumlocute, should make it all even and in their home park. The plastic and graphic arts have traveled a far piece since the anti-academy rebel. lion of the "wild beasts" in Paris It has been blessed by the work of the Impressionists, and the German school of ff, e post WWI Bau-Haus. It has suffered the same kind of anarchy as in our expectation of integ- rity, which remains a valued commodity even on the intel- lectual poor farm. We are being cheated in our hope for involvement. Who can evolve esthetic empathy for a paper touche hamburger? If we do not, or cannot enter, at least partially, into the crea- tive pattern of the artist, we are missing most of the mean- hag of art. But the deadly, insidious fak- ery is that we are being told, and told, that this is true art, and good. We are being cheat- ed by those we look to for guidance and instruction, We have no argument with the right of otherwise compe- tent artists to muck about in a trashy search for sensation- 1JHrH[itr1[1iiP51ltfqP1tqlP1Fll11tiT1rLt[hl1H1L Legion of Decency First-Run Movies Showing in Seattle A-l--My Fair Lady, (recommended), It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. A-4--Pumpkln Eater. C--KIss Me Stupid. Other Movies Currently Showing A-l--Clmorron, So Dear to My Heart, The Disorderly Orderly. A-2--Good Neighbor Sam, World of Henry Orient, Blood on the Arrow, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, I'd Rather Be Rich, Ensign Pulver. alism. Our objection is that art galleries and public places of exhibition accept these child- ish reproductions, and from their lofty perch succeed in a very tawdry con game with the public. Nor do we disagree with the experimental in art. Without the vigorous and the new, we bog down in mediocracy. Pop art is not vigorous. It is not new since the advent of the color camera and enlarger. Pop art is not social com- ment. It is not art. It is not even anti-art. It is, finally, a social bore. And what is worse, it is a bore inflicted on us by these that should know better. But Merry Christmas, any- wayl Legion Condemns "To Love' Movie NEW YORK (NC)--The Na- tional Legion of Decency de- scribed the Swedish-made mo- vie "To Love," distributed by Prominent Films, as "little more than a lengthly exercise in eroticism," and evaluated it in its Class C (condemned) category. The legion posted the follow- ing objection: "This film about 'love' fails in its attempt at ironic comedy because, ambiguous in theme, it is also in treatment a little more than a lengthy exercise in eroticism, with a consequent appeal in atmosphere and vis- uels to prurient interest." Meditations On Life "t'OD is better served by giving than by giving up. Better ev en than by giving is the service which the soul renders when allowing God perfect freedom to take. The reward to the soul is that God in fact does take-- taking more than the soul knows to be there."--Van Zeller e "Love means service and therefore a very evident mark of a real love for Jesus Christ is a desire to do something for His cause." --Fr. Judge, M.S.SS.T. "Before every human heart that has ever beat out its al- lotted measures, the dare of goals as high as God Himself was tossed down: to be accept- ed, or to be fled from in ter- ror." --St. Thomas Aquinas SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26 6:30-7:00 a.m., The Hour of the Cruel. fled, KTLN, Olympia, 920 en the dial, and KITI, Centralla-Chehalls, 1420 on the dial. C--TheSllenca. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27 qnrIi[lr]1iffi]i[[]n1f1r1[Brj#11fWl91t[m1nIUntt1Ht11t1t1U 6:30-7:1i a.m., Tho Hour ot tho Cruet. Feature Films On Television Bellingham I'NG-TY (IC) Channel 5 RVOS-1N Channel 12 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma Seattle KTITr-TV (CBS) Channel 11 KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 KT'v.'/'V Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobjectionable for GenBrnl Patronage; A-II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolets; A-III--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults: A-IV--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults, with reservations; B--Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C--Condemned; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: Th# Mtings listed below w#re those given the origmd movies. /lost films before being shown on tele- vision dee edited to conform to the re'vision code and to the tndividxd stion's time schedzle. For this re,son, objectiondble prts ontained in the original plot may be #eteted in the television verston dnd thts the original l.gion ring m,y not be entirelF correct.) SATURDAY, DECEMBER $:04 p.m.--KTVW.'rV--Dude Cowboy ...................................... A-t 1):00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--On the Riviera ...................................... O I):00 P'm--KVOS'TVmTrlbate to a Bad Man ............................ A-2 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--The Doctor and tho Girl .......................... A-2 11:05 p.m.--KING-TV--Secret of St. Ires .................................. A-2 t:00 a.m.--KVOS-TV--Flve ................................................ A-2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27 2:00 p.m.--KJNG-TV--Ten Wanted Men .................................... B S:t5 p.m--KIRO-TV--Submarlne Seahawk ................................. A-I 4:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Barbary Pirate ......................... . .......... A-2 6:00 p.m.--KVOS.TV--Them ............................................... A-I 7:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Rlver Lady ........................................ A-2 1| mldnlght--KVOS.TV--Captaln China ................................... A-2 MONDAY, DECEMBER 211 11:0 e.m.--KVOS-TV--The Velvet Touch .................................. A-2 S:I0 p.m.--KING-TV--West Point Story ...... ; ........................... A-2 7:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Plrotes af Tripoli .................................. A-2 7:0 p.m.--KtNG-TV--Haw to Make a Monster ........................... A-2 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Maglc Town ....................................... A-2 11:30 p.m.--KiNG.TV--Pearl of the South Paclnc ........................ A-2 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2 11:30u.m.--KVO$-TV--The Velvet Touch ................................ A-2 S:30 p.m.--KING-TV--West Point Story ................................... A-2 S:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Terror on a Train ................................. A-1 10:1$ p.m.--KTNT-TV--Lndy In Question .................................. A-2 !1:00 p.m.--KVOS.TV--61owlng Wild ...................................... A-2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30 11:00 e.m.--KVOS.TV--The Sisters ........................................ A-2 :04 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Stormy Weather ................................... A-2 S:30 p.m.--KINn-TV--Bamboo Prison .................................... A-2 S:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Chlna Venture ..................................... A-2 1):00 p.m.--KING-TV--Elephant Walk ...................................... A-2 10:15 p.m.--KTNT.TV--leeland ............ . ...... . ......................... A-2 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Oesflnatlon Tokyo .................................. A-1 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31 lt:30 a.m.--KVOS-TV--The Sisters ........................................ A-2 3:30 p.fll.--K I NG-TV--Oklnawa ............................................ A-2 5:30 p.m.--KVOS.TV--Rase Bowl Story ................................... A-1 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--My Gun le Quick ................................... B 12:15 o.m.KING-TV--HoIIdoy Inn ........................................ A,1 ]2:e e.m.--KVOS-TV--Verdlct ............................................... E FRIDAY, JANUARY 1 2:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Farle Holiday ...................................... A-1 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Glrl From Avenue A .................. , ........... A-1 S:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Gung Ha ........................................... A-2 $:00 p.m.--KING-TV--Klng Creole ......................................... B 8:30 p.m.KING-TV--The Calne Mutiny .................................. A-I 10:00 p.m.KTNT-TV--Coney Island ........................................ e It:0e p.m.--KVOS-TV--Valentlno ............................................ B l:00e.m.--KVOS-TV--Three Stripes In The Sun .......................... A-I This Revvew Is Sponsored by Cafhol;c Gifts & Church Goods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasant shopping atmosphere with a select variety of religious gifts. b07 Union St., Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 fled, KVI, Seattle, S70 on radlo dial. 7:30 a.m., The Catholic Hour, KING radio, 1090 on dial. 7:45 a.m., Hour of St. Francls, KXA, Soattlo, "Whof's Wrong Wlth This Picture?" S:00 a.m., The Hour Of tho Crucified, KBKW, Aberdeen, 4SO en radio dial. 4:30 p.m., Challonge, KOMO.TV, Chan- nel 4. Panelists Rev. William Treacy, Rabbi Raphael Levlne and Dr. Lynn Carson discuss "New Directions at the Cath. ollc Faith." 7:15 p.m., Sacred Heart Program, KTVW-TV, Channel 1S. Series on Recent Literature Continues. 1):30 p.m., KOMO radio, '*Seattle Onl. versify." New educational series with guests NIGHTLY I1:S0-12:00 p.m. The Rosary, KTVW.TV, Channel 13. Sign-off broadcast, o decade of the Rosary In beautiful picture and sound. EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 1):30-10:04 p.m. The Rosary, KTVW-TV, Channel 13. Sign-off broadcast, a decade of the Rosary In beautiful picture and sound. Siding the War on Poverty By J. J. GILBERT ASHINGTON  Widespread inter- est and support on the part of Catholic groups and organizations for the nation's anti-poverty program is evident from an initial survey just com- pleted. More than 50 special archdiocesan and dio- cesan committees already have been established to give coordination and leadership to participa- tion volunteered in their respective areas. Other such committees are in the process of organiza- tion. Meanwhile, the National Catholic Coordi- nating Committee has responded to numerous appeals from local Catholic agencies for assist- ance in preparing and submitting anti-poverty proposals to the Office of Economic Opportunity. The coordinating committee is made up of de- partments of the National Catholic Welfare Con- ference and other national Catholic agencies. The coordinating committee's handbook, "The War on Poverty," has been received favor- ably by church, social service, youth, education and other groups throughout the country. Not only Catholic organizations but also non-Catholic, state and Federal governmental agencies have requested copies of the hand- book in numbers. The publication summarized the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 and suggests opportunities for participation that are available to private agencies through the legislation. United Funds organizations and councils of social agencies throughout the nation are among those groups asking for the handbook. Among the Catholic organizations to which it has gone are diocesan bureaus for youth, charities, educa. tion, family and rural life, Councils of Catholic Men, Councils of Catholic Women and Councils of Catholic Nurses. The Government's war on poverty seeks to help between 30 and 40 million Americans in dire need to help themselves; to aid them in achiev- ing happier and more meaningful lives; to open the gates of opportunity to them. The Act is de- signed "not only to relieve the symptoms of poverty but to cure it; and above all, to prevent it." Among the numerous ways in which private agencies can greatly advance the anti-poverty campaign is one which would seem to fall pe- culiarly within their competence- recruitment and screening. Private agencies, particularly schools and social services, are in a unique posi- tion to identify potential trainees and to encour- age them to enroll in the Job Corps. Not only are they closer to the problem and those whom the program is trying to reach, but parish priests, teachers, social workers, CYO directors, youth counselors and others with experience with youth are specially qualified to incite in a potential trainee the interest he must have be- fore he will seek admittance to the Job Corps. It is hard to think of anyone better suited than a private agency worker experienced in youth work to screen and select the most suit- able prospects. But private agencies have important con- tributions to make on a wide scale. The National Catholic Coordinating Committee on Economic Opportunity is helping to alert private agencies to the role they can play, to explain the legisla- tion, to suggest ways for private groups to or- ganize their resources, to identify specific proj- ects that may be undertaken. The response to this proffered service has been enthusiastic. Little of True Peace (Continued From Page 1) chief of state. Premier Suu also still holds his post. If Huong resigned, and the powers of government should revert to a military junta, the vociferous demands for a civi- lian rule would perhaps again explode into demonstrations and violence, as occurred back in August and continued until Huong and the High Council took over. It will be recalled that cer- tain Buddhist groups were in the forefront of the agitation for a civilian government, yet one week after Huong's instal- lation early in November, stu- dent riots undet Buddhist lead- ership again erupted. The Catholics had announced that they were willing to give Huong's government a fair trial and took no part in the demon- strations. While the news did not spe- cifically indicate who the Bud- dhist leaders were, Thich Tri Quang was prominently men- tioned as working behind the scenes. Quang was under a cloud while Ngo Dinh Diem was still president of South Vietnam. When he was in danger of be- ing apprehended, he sought and received refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Salgon where he was at the' time of Diem's as- sassination. Interesting to note, Quang had worked with the Commu- nist Vietminh a g a i n s t the French from 1946-1950, when he assertedly broke with the Reds. However, he continued to maintain c o n t a c t with North Vietnam. Of interest, too, is the fact that he was militantly opposed to Khanb last August. His position in relation to the "Young Turks" is not known at this writing. UN Old Hat The glass edifice on New York's East River bank has been jumping ever since the 19th UN session opened, and this week is no exception. False and absurd charges continue to reverberate as Belgium and the U.S. remain under violent a t t a c k. This tends to obscure the financial delinquency of the Commu- nist members who neverthe- less continue to use both the General Assembly and the Security Council as propa- ganda forums. Secretary General U Thant, still under doctor's care as the result of a peptic ulcer, has been unable to come up with the expected device to bypass Article 19 of the UN Charter, which the U.S. wants enforced against the Soviet Union. Instead, Assembly president Alex Quaison-Sakey has pro- posed a compromise formula, whereby "adequate and sub- stantial" voluntary contribu- tions or pledges would be made by all members to a fund to stabilize UN finances. li this compromise should be accepted, the S o v i e t Union would be let off the hook, for Article 19 would then not even be mentioned. The amazing aspect of the scheme is that tentative ap- proval has been given by the U.S., w h e r e a s the Soviet Union has been non-commit- tal. At deadline, it is expected to accept the plan, but, as heretofore, to decline stipu- lating any definite amount or the time it intends to pay. Whither has that oft-repeated with adamant Andrei Gromyko on a wide range of subjects, making every effort to reach some kind of agreement on something. Although at the end of each session, the participants report that the talks have been useful and fruitful, ap- parently the status qua still revails. Gromyko w i I 1 not udge. Meanwhile, the Organization of African Unity has moved into the act, or more precisely, has taken over in the General Assembly. Not all its members are in agreement with the pro- cedures, but the O.A.U. ring- leaders are carrying the ball. They will not cease their ti- rades against the West in gen- eral, and against the U.S. and Belgium in particular, for the Congo rescue mission. At the same time, the press daily reports brutality and kill- ings of innocent foreigners in the Congo. And with it, the fur- ther evidence that the Soviet Union and Red China are back- ing the Congolese rebels. The O.A.U, spokesmen in- sist on renewing their line of attack in the General Assam. bly following a recess begin. ning Wednesday and lasting until the middle of January. This, the Communist dele- gates hope, will provide time to conjure up another compromise whereby to throw the West for a loss. Yes, it's the same old hat in the UN. In New Forms ... The Church will bring itself into step with modern times... The council intends to be the starting point of a general re- newal.., to bring to the atten- tion of the whole world the ancient truths reflected in new U.S. demand that the Soviet foms. --Pope John XXIII. Union pay its just dues accord- ,,,,,,,H, tH,r,:,,,,,mm,,w,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,H, ing to Article 19 vanished? Letter.Wrlters Recess Begins During the past week, Secre- tary of State Dean Rusk has held numerous closed sessions For a Merrier Christmas By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SHEEN Who saves us from our sins." @ During the year, you will read about the misery of Jesus prolonged in His Church; you will hear of the hunger of Latin America; the poverty of priests, bishops and religious in Asia; the misery of lepers. Never say: "Oh, I must send them a dollar; they are so miserable." But rather: "I am so miserable1 What can I do to express my poverty, my spiritual leprosy, my soul which is worse than a hovel?" When you think this way, you think Christian; you think with the mind of Christ. Above all you will under- stand that you never become conscious of an- other's misery until you are conscious of your own sins. Making up for your spiritual misery by helping their physical misery will turn your misery into something merry--Merry Christmas. GOD LOVE YOU to a woman unafraid to face herself in the mirror. "1 was going to use this small check to 'wash away the gray" but in your hands may it help to wash the wounds of lepers." . . To M.C.N. /or her donation of $100, the equivalent o[ her Christmas Club check. Would you like to get more mileage out of your money by giving to the Missions? By tak- ing out an annuity with The Society for the Propagation of the Faith you will receive annual returns on your investment and save on capital- gains tax while you save souls. Send your ap- preciable securities to The Society for the Prop- agation of the Faith and you will receive a greater return spiritually and materially. Direct your request for our pamphlet on annuities, in- cluding the date of your birth, to Most Reverend Fulton J. Sheen, 366 5th Ave., New York, N.Y. 41 Cut out this dolumn, pin your sacrifice to it and mail to Me s t Reverend Fulton ]. Sheen, National Director of the Society [or the Propa- lation o[ the Faith, 366-5th Ave., New York, .Y. 10001, or your Archdiocesan Director, Roy. Stephen Szeman, 907 Trry Aye., Seattle 98104. E never become conscious of an- other's misery until we are con- scious of our own. The rich man does not think of the slums of the world as he follows the advance of the stock market. The healthy athlete does not agonize with the sick in hos- pitals, nor did the innkeeper of Bethlehem con- sider the cold in the cave a mile down the road. Who has the power to grasp the mystery of Christmas? Not necessarily the homeless, for there are kinds of misery other than economic and physical. Only the person who is conscious of his own sins can ever be conscious of the hu- miliations of God becoming Man to save him from sin. The wounded look upon a physician with eyes both pleading and hopeful. As Our Lord said: "Those who are well have no need 'of a physician." Our world is full of "healthy people" who deny they are physically sick, or guilty, or sin- ners. They never DID wrong; they were ACTED upon by insufficient playgrounds, Grade B milk and too much maternal affection! Herod did not come to the crib, neither did the citizens of Jerusalem, neither did the scribes and the self- righteous, because not being thirsty why should they go to the Fountain of Life; not being in misery why should they go to Mercy? I% one understands Christmas better than a sinner; no one understands it less than the "sin-less." the "guilt-less" and the "pure.conscious." Having no wounds why seek a Healer? The very name given to the God Who be- came Man was "Jesus" which is the Greek for "Savior." If a Hebrew name were used instead of Greek, he would be called "Joshua," 'the savior who brought the people of God into the Promised Land. The Gospel, therefore, ties up Christmas with the salvation of sin--"Jesus, All letters addressed to the Editor in "Our Readers Write" must be signed. Names will be withheld at request. Unsigned letters will never be published. Letter-writers are asked to keep their messages short. i1.11,lltll'lJ'.l:lFl,l:tlllli:r ' :1 IIW J W.rlllllll]llllllTilllt]ll[]ll!l:lTIIITfl IE11!1111rllll. Grandparents Take Over Child.Rearing By JOHN J. KANE, Ph.D. Profeaea o4 Soalology, University ef Notre Dame I am 20, married with two children. My husband a.d 1 live with my parents. I have nothing but sleepless nights and troubled days because my parents have replaced us with our children. We are no longer called mother and dad by the children. My parents are. If my husband corrects a child, World War I!I breaks out with my mother. Last night she slapped my husband across the face [or correcting the older child. 1 simply cannot take it. OUR LETTER is a pathetic but not unusual one. You are experiencing one of the most common difficulties stemming from teen-age marriage  par- ental, or, in the case of your husband, in-law interference. One of the major problems in teen-age marriages is that the parents or one or both of the newlyweds feel that they are still children. They may help them financially, but almost inevitably, when they do, they expect the right to dominate. But the type of experience you are undergoing is not limited to teen-age marriages. Grandparents usually do love their grandchildren, perhaps not so wisely as so well. For some of them it provides the vicarious experience of again being parents of small children. But they also enjoy an escape hatch. When the going gets too rough, they can always get out. It is sad to report it but grandparents, particularly grand- mothers, sometimes steal the affection of children from their own parents. They may not intend to do so. and might, indeed, be amazed if such a charge were made. But it can be docu- mented only too well. Grandparents tend to be both overindulgent and overpro- tective. Not infrequently they are in a position to provide more of the material things for children than their own parents can. And sometimes they provide things the parents simply do not want children to have, Sweets are a good example. HEN the misdemeanor is discovered, and it usually is, mothers are apt to be wrathful. They may first reprimand the grandparent, but they are also likely to correct the children Now Grandmom can really move ha as the protector of the child in a situation which she created. Children only require a few experiences of this nature to learn how to thwart a parent's will. It may begin with sweets but it can and inevitably will be extended to other matters. Parental attempts at discipline are futile while indulgent and "butting in" grandparents--are in the wings. Obviously, this situation can become quite serious when grandparents reside permanently in the home. This does not apply to all grandparents. Some are quite sen- sible about the necessity for discipline, Some do,treat their children as adults and allow them to rear their own offspring, But there are others. Somehow or other, as soon as possible, you must move into your own home. You will be alone and you can once again become the actual parent as well as the natural parent of your children. J PREDICT in the wake of what is occurring another difficulty that could wreck your marriage. How does a husband and father react when slapped in the face by his mother-in-law for correcting his child? More im- portant, how did you react? How long can this type ef thing go on without quarrels between you and your husband? You will be torn apart psychologically. You must stand: beside ycatr hband in his role as a father. Yet, in doing so, you will antagonize your mother, so you are caught between two of the people whom you probably love most deeply. Until the time comes when you can move, and I hope it is very soon, some ground rules must be established. Begin by insisting that your children address you as Mother and Dad. Teach them to address your parents as Grandmom and Grand- pop, or wlatever other terms suit their fancy--but not Mother and Father. Perhaps a quiet talk with your father may gain you an ally. If so, you will be fortunate. Make it clear that you intend to rear your own children. If feasible, take them out each day alone. Discourage your mother from accompanying you. If your mother is |ceding the childrca, changing diapers, and such, take the task over yourself. It may be that you have allowed your mother to act as a surrogate mother to the children. If so, you have ivited the situation in which you now find yourself. It will not be easy to change it. You will have to work harder at being a full time mother. But there really is no choice. There is another dimension. If your in-inws live in the same city, it is almost inevitable that they will sympathize with him, and I fear you may come in for some criticism. This is how some marriages are ruined. You and your husband will have to take heart and, even though the economic problem of setting up your own home may seem insuperable at the moment, you will have to do so. This is, you will have to do it, if you want a home, a happy life and your children as your own. Calendar Tues., omlnlng commemoration of St. Thomas. Camp. of Sun. 2 CI. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31 THURS- DAY WITHIN THE NATIVITY OC- TAVE MASS (as In old Missal for Doc. 30) (White). GI., 2rid Pr. at St. Sylvester, Cr., Pref. etc. of Not. DIV. OFF. (e). Lauds: prop. ant. etc. from Nat., Pss. of Sun., c. of St. Sylvester. Little Hrs.: Pss. of Fetid. Vespers of Oct. Day of Hat. (A) no c. Camp. of Sun. 2 Cl. FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, OCTAVE OF THE NATIVITY OF OUR LORD MASS: Puer natus est -- A chlJd is born (White). GI., Cr., Pref. and Comm. of Nat. Mass for Parish. DIV. OFF. (A). Camp. of Sun. Funeral Mass for- bidden. First Frh Votive Mass of Sacred Heart forbidden. Holyday -- No Abstinence I Cl. SATURDAY, JANUARY 2, SATUR- DAY OF OUR LADY MASS: Vultum tuum--AII the rich (White). GI., no Cr., Prof. of e.V.M. DIV. OFF. (C). Vespers (A) (White) of Holy Name of Jesus Camp. of Sun. First Sat. Votive Mass of Immac. Heart pertained (White). Gt., Pref. of B.V.M. First Sofurday. 4 el. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, SUNDAY WITHIN THE NATIVITY OCTAVE MASS: Dum medium--While around (Whlto) GI., 2nd Pr. of St. John, Cr. Fret. ect. of Nat. Mass for Parish. DIV. OFF. (A) of Sun. Lauds: c of St. John, Vespers: no c Camp. of Sun. 2 CI. MONDAY, DECEMBER 28, HOLY |NNOCENTS, Martyrs MASS: Ex ore.-- Our of the mouths (Red]. GI., 2nd Pr. of Nat., Alleluia, Cr., Pret. etc. of NAT. DIV. OFF (O). Lauds. c. of Nat. Little Hrs.: Pss. from Ferla. Vespers (A) of Nat. to Ch., rest from Holy Innocents, c. of Not. Camp. of Sun. 2 CI. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, TUES- DAY WITHIN THE NATIVITY OC- TAVE MASS (as In old Missal for Dec. 30) (White). GI,, 2nd Pr. of St. Thomas, Gr., Prof. etc. of Hat. OIV. OFF. (S). Lauds: ant. from Nat., Pss. from Sun., rest from Nat., c. of St. Thamas. LIttla Hrs.: Fss. from Feda, rest from Nat. Vespers from Nat., no c. Camp. of Sun. 2 CI. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30 WED- NESDAY WITHIN THE NATIVITY OCTAVE MASS and OFFICE as on PERFECT CHOICE FOR A FESTIVE OCCASION 00hrisliun 00Brothcrs Naturally Fermented Sparkling Wine Charmat Bulk Process The Chrlttlan Brothers,  California with Jtemember "SUNNY JIM," famous Peanut Buffer, Jams & Presorvu