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Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947
 

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Page Twenty-Six The CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Torture of the Mind Polish Underground Leader Tells How Soviet Experts Secure Confessions  ECTURING in Dublin, M. Sty- pulkowski, a Polish patriot and underground leader, who had fought against Hitler, and who later was tricked into imprisonment by the Soviet, gave a personal account of the methods used in the Soviet prisons. M Stypulkowski is the first man who has pleaded "not guilty" in a Moscow trial, and one of the very few to reach the Western world after such an experi- ence. He was one of the sixteen Polish lead- ers who, on advice from London and Washington, contacted the Red Army in the final battle against Germany. Under pretence of negotiating, and after guar- anteeing their safety, the Soviet put the sixteen in prison and denied all know- ledge of their whereabouts, until they thought ;they had sufficient "confessions" to present to the San Francisco Confer- ence. M. Stypulkowski, at the Dublin meeting told his listeners how he was tricked into going to :Moscow, and how he found him- self delivered at the infamous Lubianko prison in a luxurious Soviet staff car. There during 70 days preceding his "'trial" he was subjected, day and night, to 141 sessions of questioning. The length of the interrogations varied between 3 and 15 hours. On entering the prison he was stripped and searched by a young woman, and then taken to a small cell with green pain-ted walls and a wire netting win- dow. It was on the third day he waz FENTRON STEEL WORKS, INC. :1401 W. Garfield St. GArfied 7548 PACIFIC WATER WORKS SUPPLY CO. Pipes for Sale, Large Quantities 4", 6", 8", and 12" New Steel Pipe Treated for Water Lines. Also Necessary Valves and Fittings 2900 First South, Seattle MAin 8615 r BIRKEL ELECTRIC CO. 800 Pine St. EL. 2913 Lighting Fixtures, Flouresoent Lighting Commercial,and Residential Wiring Repairing - Appliances Gift Novelties ORA'S WHOLESALE PRODUCE 1123 Western Ave. MAin 0768 MAIn 8505 HI-GRADE DAIRYCO. Perfectly Pasteurized Milk and Cream Pure, "Fresh and Delioious 820 Yale Ave. N. MAin 1766 CARVER ADJUSTMENT CO. COLLECTIONS Experienced and Competent Service Seaboard Building MAin 747 first handed warrants charging him with sabotaging in the rear of the Red Army. His questioner was a major of the N.K. V.D. (Secret Police) who had full power= of life and death. This major, operating apparently to the usual plan, had three tasks: first, to discover the prisoner's background, the details of his family, and to assess hi, mental and his will power; secondly, to play on the prisoner's imagination, to ruin his mental balance, and destroy hi| sense of judgmerit; and thirdly, to distort the prisoner's instinct of self-preserva- tion. At the first interrogation the major was affable. After cordis/ greetings he assured the prisoner his arrest was prob- ably all a mistake and pointed out that for routine purposes he needed to" know, amongst other things, the whereabouts of M. Stypulkowski's wife and family. Fortunately for the latter, his family's whereabouts were unknown, as they were either on the run from the Nazis or in unknom German concentration camps. His companions, the other Polish leado ers; were not so fortunate. In their cases, he learned afterwards, their families were located, and within a few days the pris- oners discovered at their interrogations that sentimental and personal trinkets belonging to their wives, mothers and their children, were on the prosecutor's desk. No mention was made of the belong- Ings or the fate of their owners. They were just left in sight to increase the prisoners' acute mental distress. In M. Stypulkowski's case, he told his Dublin audience, the first fifteen sessionn with his interrogator consisted mostly of statements, not questions. He had to sit with hands on the table, and facing a strong light. He was not allowed to glance even out of the cor- ner of his eye. The major's main task appeared to be to keep him talking. "You know best what you have done and what you have to tell," was his sug- gestion, but talk ranged over a wide variety of topics---the underground strug- gle in Polond, the situation In Bulgaria and Turkey, Britain and India, human character, communism, etc. For the first fifteen sessions there was no attempt to bring up subjects connected with the "charges" made by the Soviet in Stypulkowski's case. "Let us get over this questioning. Your country needs you. You must get back to work,".was the attitude frequently adopt- ed by the major in these early stages. Then the tactics were varied. At one time the prisoner was persuaded he should be free and there was every chance things would be all right almost immediately. From this the attitude switched to treat- ing him as a "dirty spy" and assuring him that he could not depend on Anglo- American aid or protection. He was told that all was known, that his prosecutorz hacl full evidence of his alleged sabotage. Many things also were hinted and never clearly defined. After a while, when physical and men- tal strain takes ltm to]], the prisoner, said M. Stypulkowski, almost believes the as- sertionp made by his interrogator, who also hammers incessantly at the sugges- tion that the prisoner must try to regain his liberty, not merely in his own inter- est, but tn the interests of his country. If the prisoner proves obdurate, the in- terrogator switches to threats of death, Siberia, concentration camps, and always In vague and never in defined terms. The questioning alone is an almost in- humanly powerful factor; but hunger and sleeplessness are even more powerful methods used by Kremlin "justice." When the prisoner lies down to sleep in his cell, a powerful be'am of light plays on his face If he turn on his side to es- cape, the warder noisily enters the cell and gently turns him facing the light, whispering In his ear: "It is forbidden. I must see your eyes." The cell il cold, though not freezing. It the prisoner, to get warm enough to sleep, puts his hands under the blanket, i  t @rler- aaIfi ehters J cell " an-l SEATTLE Cascade Machinery Co. 4600 E. Marginal Way, Seattle Complete Industrial, Electrical Service Repairs, Rewinding, Wiring Distributors POMONA  WESCO PUMPS Deep Well, Industrial and Domestic Systems M otore---Gene rator--T ransfo r rne rs SEATTLE RAINIER BASEBALL CLUB INC. Extends Cordial Holiday Greetings RAINIER & McCLELLAN SEATTLE RETAIL LUMBER 6797 E. Marginal Way RAinier 2332 Sincere Holiday Greetings EASTMAN KODAK STO R ES, I N C. 1319 Fourth Ave. MAin 9072 WELDING Ferrofix Brazing and Machine Works Boiler and Furnace Repair Work and Welding of All Kinds 816 1st South IAin 6412 STONE & ROTHENBERG TAILORS Exclusive Agents for Burberry's of London Douglas Bldg.. 4th and Union - MA. 4137 SEATTLE CAP & APPAREL MANUFACTURING CO. Inc. 160 Jackson St. MAIn-6416 INSURANCE SEASON'S GREETINGS E. STAVIG 518 J. VANCE BUILDING *PEAT BELTING & MILL SUPPLY CO. Msnufacturere of Leather Belting Belt Repairing- Belt Dressing Rubber Belting and V-Belts 2430 First Ave. S. EL. 5130 SEATTLE DISPOSAL C0. 912 DEXTER A/-E. Telephones--GA. 0450 - GA. 0451 Fill Dirt Far Sale, Gas Shovel and Truck Rentals- Rubbish Hauled Season's Greetings Austin Finance Co. NINTH AVE. and WESTLAKE MAIn 0855 CHRISTMAS GREETINGS ROSAIA BROTHERS Florists For 88 Years to the People of Seattle 6TH AVE. AT PINE ST. FLOWER PHONE  MAIN 2858 WASHINGTON ASPHALT CO. 809 W. $9th St. MElrose 2707 1MO HARBOR AVE. 8. W. SEASON'S GREETINGS HEALY'S" BOATHOUSE VES'P 9961 WESTERN MACARONI AND WHOLESALE CO. 1725 Jackson St. EA. 8670 Specializing In Food Produota STEVE PIERGROSSI, M:gr, WM. D. PERKINS, Inc. Established 1893 BONDS - MORTGAGES LOANS INSURANCE Let Us Manage Your Properties 703 New World Life Building I HAROLD J. EGAN I EVERYTHING IN iNSURANCE 767 EMPIRE BUILDING--MAIN 7474 -BARTO & CO. LOANS. COLLINS BUILDING, Second at James MAin 8332 Page Twenty-Six The CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Torture of the Mind Polish Underground Leader Tells How Soviet Experts Secure Confessions  ECTURING in Dublin, M. Sty- pulkowski, a Polish patriot and underground leader, who had fought against Hitler, and who later was tricked into imprisonment by the Soviet, gave a personal account of the methods used in the Soviet prisons. M Stypulkowski is the first man who has pleaded "not guilty" in a Moscow trial, and one of the very few to reach the Western world after such an experi- ence. He was one of the sixteen Polish lead- ers who, on advice from London and Washington, contacted the Red Army in the final battle against Germany. Under pretence of negotiating, and after guar- anteeing their safety, the Soviet put the sixteen in prison and denied all know- ledge of their whereabouts, until they thought ;they had sufficient "confessions" to present to the San Francisco Confer- ence. M. Stypulkowski, at the Dublin meeting told his listeners how he was tricked into going to :Moscow, and how he found him- self delivered at the infamous Lubianko prison in a luxurious Soviet staff car. There during 70 days preceding his "'trial" he was subjected, day and night, to 141 sessions of questioning. The length of the interrogations varied between 3 and 15 hours. On entering the prison he was stripped and searched by a young woman, and then taken to a small cell with green pain-ted walls and a wire netting win- dow. It was on the third day he waz FENTRON STEEL WORKS, INC. :1401 W. Garfield St. GArfied 7548 PACIFIC WATER WORKS SUPPLY CO. Pipes for Sale, Large Quantities 4", 6", 8", and 12" New Steel Pipe Treated for Water Lines. Also Necessary Valves and Fittings 2900 First South, Seattle MAin 8615 r BIRKEL ELECTRIC CO. 800 Pine St. EL. 2913 Lighting Fixtures, Flouresoent Lighting Commercial,and Residential Wiring Repairing - Appliances Gift Novelties ORA'S WHOLESALE PRODUCE 1123 Western Ave. MAin 0768 MAIn 8505 HI-GRADE DAIRYCO. Perfectly Pasteurized Milk and Cream Pure, "Fresh and Delioious 820 Yale Ave. N. MAin 1766 CARVER ADJUSTMENT CO. COLLECTIONS Experienced and Competent Service Seaboard Building MAin 747 first handed warrants charging him with sabotaging in the rear of the Red Army. His questioner was a major of the N.K. V.D. (Secret Police) who had full power= of life and death. This major, operating apparently to the usual plan, had three tasks: first, to discover the prisoner's background, the details of his family, and to assess hi, mental and his will power; secondly, to play on the prisoner's imagination, to ruin his mental balance, and destroy hi| sense of judgmerit; and thirdly, to distort the prisoner's instinct of self-preserva- tion. At the first interrogation the major was affable. After cordis/ greetings he assured the prisoner his arrest was prob- ably all a mistake and pointed out that for routine purposes he needed to" know, amongst other things, the whereabouts of M. Stypulkowski's wife and family. Fortunately for the latter, his family's whereabouts were unknown, as they were either on the run from the Nazis or in unknom German concentration camps. His companions, the other Polish leado ers; were not so fortunate. In their cases, he learned afterwards, their families were located, and within a few days the pris- oners discovered at their interrogations that sentimental and personal trinkets belonging to their wives, mothers and their children, were on the prosecutor's desk. No mention was made of the belong- Ings or the fate of their owners. They were just left in sight to increase the prisoners' acute mental distress. In M. Stypulkowski's case, he told his Dublin audience, the first fifteen sessionn with his interrogator consisted mostly of statements, not questions. He had to sit with hands on the table, and facing a strong light. He was not allowed to glance even out of the cor- ner of his eye. The major's main task appeared to be to keep him talking. "You know best what you have done and what you have to tell," was his sug- gestion, but talk ranged over a wide variety of topics---the underground strug- gle in Polond, the situation In Bulgaria and Turkey, Britain and India, human character, communism, etc. For the first fifteen sessions there was no attempt to bring up subjects connected with the "charges" made by the Soviet in Stypulkowski's case. "Let us get over this questioning. Your country needs you. You must get back to work,".was the attitude frequently adopt- ed by the major in these early stages. Then the tactics were varied. At one time the prisoner was persuaded he should be free and there was every chance things would be all right almost immediately. From this the attitude switched to treat- ing him as a "dirty spy" and assuring him that he could not depend on Anglo- American aid or protection. He was told that all was known, that his prosecutorz hacl full evidence of his alleged sabotage. Many things also were hinted and never clearly defined. After a while, when physical and men- tal strain takes ltm to]], the prisoner, said M. Stypulkowski, almost believes the as- sertionp made by his interrogator, who also hammers incessantly at the sugges- tion that the prisoner must try to regain his liberty, not merely in his own inter- est, but tn the interests of his country. If the prisoner proves obdurate, the in- terrogator switches to threats of death, Siberia, concentration camps, and always In vague and never in defined terms. The questioning alone is an almost in- humanly powerful factor; but hunger and sleeplessness are even more powerful methods used by Kremlin "justice." When the prisoner lies down to sleep in his cell, a powerful be'am of light plays on his face If he turn on his side to es- cape, the warder noisily enters the cell and gently turns him facing the light, whispering In his ear: "It is forbidden. I must see your eyes." The cell il cold, though not freezing. It the prisoner, to get warm enough to sleep, puts his hands under the blanket, i  t @rler- aaIfi ehters J cell " an-l SEATTLE Cascade Machinery Co. 4600 E. Marginal Way, Seattle Complete Industrial, Electrical Service Repairs, Rewinding, Wiring Distributors POMONA  WESCO PUMPS Deep Well, Industrial and Domestic Systems M otore---Gene rator--T ransfo r rne rs SEATTLE RAINIER BASEBALL CLUB INC. Extends Cordial Holiday Greetings RAINIER & McCLELLAN SEATTLE RETAIL LUMBER 6797 E. Marginal Way RAinier 2332 Sincere Holiday Greetings EASTMAN KODAK STO R ES, I N C. 1319 Fourth Ave. MAin 9072 WELDING Ferrofix Brazing and Machine Works Boiler and Furnace Repair Work and Welding of All Kinds 816 1st South IAin 6412 STONE & ROTHENBERG TAILORS Exclusive Agents for Burberry's of London Douglas Bldg.. 4th and Union - MA. 4137 SEATTLE CAP & APPAREL MANUFACTURING CO. Inc. 160 Jackson St. MAIn-6416 INSURANCE SEASON'S GREETINGS E. STAVIG 518 J. VANCE BUILDING *PEAT BELTING & MILL SUPPLY CO. Msnufacturere of Leather Belting Belt Repairing- Belt Dressing Rubber Belting and V-Belts 2430 First Ave. S. EL. 5130 SEATTLE DISPOSAL C0. 912 DEXTER A/-E. Telephones--GA. 0450 - GA. 0451 Fill Dirt Far Sale, Gas Shovel and Truck Rentals- Rubbish Hauled Season's Greetings Austin Finance Co. NINTH AVE. and WESTLAKE MAIn 0855 CHRISTMAS GREETINGS ROSAIA BROTHERS Florists For 88 Years to the People of Seattle 6TH AVE. AT PINE ST. FLOWER PHONE  MAIN 2858 WASHINGTON ASPHALT CO. 809 W. $9th St. MElrose 2707 1MO HARBOR AVE. 8. W. SEASON'S GREETINGS HEALY'S" BOATHOUSE VES'P 9961 WESTERN MACARONI AND WHOLESALE CO. 1725 Jackson St. EA. 8670 Specializing In Food Produota STEVE PIERGROSSI, M:gr, WM. D. PERKINS, Inc. Established 1893 BONDS - MORTGAGES LOANS INSURANCE Let Us Manage Your Properties 703 New World Life Building I HAROLD J. EGAN I EVERYTHING IN iNSURANCE 767 EMPIRE BUILDING--MAIN 7474 -BARTO & CO. LOANS. COLLINS BUILDING, Second at James MAin 8332