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Catholic Northwest Progress
Seattle, Washington
December 12, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947
 

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 TZ CATHOIC NORTHWEST PROG= Pae Nineteea- Mary and the Artis ts mS csss eve,t  - in sout-hern , a few. #i tpie before going, t; .m r" midnight Mass will  gather in_- two small rooms which the Capra faro. ily- call home. - Ten-year-old Edouard. will bring out a package, wrapped in news- papers, then carefully lift from it a num- ber of Madonnas. He will place them on the mantel for all to admire. Actually these paintings are just por- traits of Edouard&apos;s mother. But through :her the young artist has pictured the Uni versal Mother, Mary, and called his pic- :tures Madonnas. To young Capra, as to the old masters, Mary is more than just a symbol. She .is a force for greater achievement. In time young Edouard may produce mas- terpieces that will be honored .for centu- ,ties, like the Madonnas of Andrea del Sarto, Raphael, Botticelli, Fra Lippo IAp- pi, and the others. The word which the masters coined for Mary, "Madonna," somehow has come to mean any pure mother--one whose motherhood is not the unwanted conse- quence of selfishness. In art Madonnas has become an expression of man's faith, and his respect for women. The brush strokes of Raphael's "Mal- enna of the Grand Duke" or of Bottlcelli's Wirgin, Infant and St. John" present Mary as a combination of .purity, gentleness, and love. For more than five centuries man has responded devotion- ally to these works, trying to grasp the effect of these masterpieces, seeking to apture the inspiration. If you once grasp that inspiration, yours is an experi- ence to treasure for the rest of your life, y)u will have had an experience in faith. Many a pretty face has smiled men to their doom, but the face of the Blessed Virgin, so beautiful and so pure, has for centuries aroused men to the highest mancttty, prompted women to make their mouis like hers so that her spiritual beau- ty might be reflected in their features. What do people think about as they look at the Madonnas? In New York recently an exhibition of the great Madonnas was held at a private gallery. Most of the pictures were not originals but faithful copies by modern artists. One old man stud before Raphael's "Madonna of the Chair." This picture, ])ainted three years before the artist's dath, is probably the most popular of his compositions. The original is only 28 inches in diameter, yet he depicts suc eessfully in this masterpiece what peo- ple love to look upon. "The thing that Impresses me about this and the other great Madonnas is the closeness with which the Virgin holds the child to her," observed the old man. "This symbolizes, I think, the close rela- tion between all women -- especially mothers--and life. By their strength and sometimes ruthlessness, men domin- ate the drama of current events; but women, in their wonderful subtle ways, mold the future. Women create the at- mosphere in which men evolve. "They shape the lives of the men who make history. "All future life comes from the body of the .mother where, for nine long and lovely months, the child hesitates on the threshold of the world." : A school teacher was looking at Pierre Mignard's "The Virgin of the Grape" otable for its touch of humor--the way the Child peers out from under Mary's headdress. Mary holds a bunch of grapes, a if trying to teach the child something of the wonder of the famous f{'ult. "'From the mother's mind," declared the schoolteacher, "comes the first truths that the child learns. From her soul come religious ideals and moral princi pies, good or bad. From her heart comes Child's first loves and hates. It is the mothers of the world who teach chtldren ow to act, and who set their feet solidly or falteringly on the roads of moral ac- tion. We school teachers only build on the foundationa that the mother has laid at home. "I wish that more mothers were like Ma. TOO ma0y of our modern mothers de,gate responsibilities that they ought to assume, with the result that- .many modern children will be saying- in a few years, 'All that-I am I owe to dear old Siwash.' " $ : All the Madonnas have not been paint- ed. Young artists like Edouard Capra are pr .oof that Mary still inspires the talented. Many scenes from the life of Our Lady are not found among the masterpieces in galleries. "I Wish that some artist would paint the three scenes in which Mary's prepa- ration for the role of the Universal Mother is unfolded," Monsignor Fulton J. Sheen stated in on of his lectures a few months ago. The first would be a picture of the finding in the Temple. After a three-day search, Mary found Je.sus among the sages in the temple. He said to her, "'Did you not know that I must be about my Father's business?" He might well have said, "Mother, don;t you know that I cannot spend all of my time With Joseph i/l the Carpenter Shop.? My Father has sent me into this world on the suPreme business of Redemption, to make all men adopted sons of the Father." If Mary caught the full meaning of those words, she must have realized that the Fatherhood of God meant that she was to be the nother of men. A number of artists have graphically portrayed the "finding," bu there is still place for a truly great masterpiece. Less frequently seen is the portrayal of the wedding feast at Cana. How much Our Lord honored all womanhood by making his first adult public appearance at a wedding! Mary, the ever watchful mother, noticed that the wine jugs were empty, and said to Him, "They have no wine." In proof that her intercession is powerful in her role as the Universal Mother, Jesus ordered the pots filled with water and turned the liquid into Wine. Two: year later, the third scene-- almost never painted  was unfolded. One day as Jesus was approaching, some- one told Him that Mary was outside and wanted to see Him. Christ aid, "Who HIS MOTHER A REAL MADONNA Ten-year-old Edouard Capra will remember hie mother as a Madonna, for In the two bare rooms of the Capra's Cannes, France home, the youth has painted Madonnas many times, using his mother ias model. The lad was a pupil of the late Pierre Bonnard leading French artist, and each evening after finishing her work as a charwoman, Madame Capra, dressed in shabby gown, poses for her son until the last bit of light'llas left the sky. Photo NCWC. is my mother?" He then answered His own question: "Whoever does the will of my Father in heaven, she is . . . my mother." Thus Our Lord pointed out that there is such .a thing as spiritual maternity--that spiritual ties Can bind us to the Universal Mother, Just as physi- cal ties bind us-to our human mothers. The stirring climax to these three scenes, the Crucifixion, has been often recorded on canvas. Antonio Da Viterbo, Antonlazzo Romano, Barnaba Da Mo- (lena, Giannicola Dt Paolo, Lorinzetti, Luea Di Tomme-and others have por- trayed the unutterable agony of that last hour. During that time, Jesus called His mother "Woman," aud in that one-word her mo.therh<0d was expanded; she be- came the mother of every human on earth. Not only did she have a Child according to the will of the Most High but, according to that same Will, she had a world-full of children. Through the words that )llowcd, "Son; behold thy mother," - we:; obtained the most loving mother in the world---the Mother of Jesl. If there were nothing real and positive about the glory-of motherhood, would Our Lord have used HJ last ounce of energy to give her to us as a Universal Mother? Would artists for five centuries have painted.great masterpieces in her honor ? I  TZ CATHOIC NORTHWEST PROG= Pae Nineteea- Mary and the Artis ts mS csss eve,t  - in sout-hern , a few. #i tpie before going, t; .m r" midnight Mass will  gather in_- two small rooms which the Capra faro. ily- call home. - Ten-year-old Edouard. will bring out a package, wrapped in news- papers, then carefully lift from it a num- ber of Madonnas. He will place them on the mantel for all to admire. Actually these paintings are just por- traits of Edouard's mother. But through :her the young artist has pictured the Uni versal Mother, Mary, and called his pic- :tures Madonnas. To young Capra, as to the old masters, Mary is more than just a symbol. She .is a force for greater achievement. In time young Edouard may produce mas- terpieces that will be honored .for centu- ,ties, like the Madonnas of Andrea del Sarto, Raphael, Botticelli, Fra Lippo IAp- pi, and the others. The word which the masters coined for Mary, "Madonna," somehow has come to mean any pure mother--one whose motherhood is not the unwanted conse- quence of selfishness. In art Madonnas has become an expression of man's faith, and his respect for women. The brush strokes of Raphael's "Mal- enna of the Grand Duke" or of Bottlcelli's Wirgin, Infant and St. John" present Mary as a combination of .purity, gentleness, and love. For more than five centuries man has responded devotion- ally to these works, trying to grasp the effect of these masterpieces, seeking to apture the inspiration. If you once grasp that inspiration, yours is an experi- ence to treasure for the rest of your life, y)u will have had an experience in faith. Many a pretty face has smiled men to their doom, but the face of the Blessed Virgin, so beautiful and so pure, has for centuries aroused men to the highest mancttty, prompted women to make their mouis like hers so that her spiritual beau- ty might be reflected in their features. What do people think about as they look at the Madonnas? In New York recently an exhibition of the great Madonnas was held at a private gallery. Most of the pictures were not originals but faithful copies by modern artists. One old man stud before Raphael's "Madonna of the Chair." This picture, ])ainted three years before the artist's dath, is probably the most popular of his compositions. The original is only 28 inches in diameter, yet he depicts suc eessfully in this masterpiece what peo- ple love to look upon. "The thing that Impresses me about this and the other great Madonnas is the closeness with which the Virgin holds the child to her," observed the old man. "This symbolizes, I think, the close rela- tion between all women -- especially mothers--and life. By their strength and sometimes ruthlessness, men domin- ate the drama of current events; but women, in their wonderful subtle ways, mold the future. Women create the at- mosphere in which men evolve. "They shape the lives of the men who make history. "All future life comes from the body of the .mother where, for nine long and lovely months, the child hesitates on the threshold of the world." : A school teacher was looking at Pierre Mignard's "The Virgin of the Grape" otable for its touch of humor--the way the Child peers out from under Mary's headdress. Mary holds a bunch of grapes, a if trying to teach the child something of the wonder of the famous f{'ult. "'From the mother's mind," declared the schoolteacher, "comes the first truths that the child learns. From her soul come religious ideals and moral princi pies, good or bad. From her heart comes Child's first loves and hates. It is the mothers of the world who teach chtldren ow to act, and who set their feet solidly or falteringly on the roads of moral ac- tion. We school teachers only build on the foundationa that the mother has laid at home. "I wish that more mothers were like Ma. TOO ma0y of our modern mothers de,gate responsibilities that they ought to assume, with the result that- .many modern children will be saying- in a few years, 'All that-I am I owe to dear old Siwash.' " $ : All the Madonnas have not been paint- ed. Young artists like Edouard Capra are pr .oof that Mary still inspires the talented. Many scenes from the life of Our Lady are not found among the masterpieces in galleries. "I Wish that some artist would paint the three scenes in which Mary's prepa- ration for the role of the Universal Mother is unfolded," Monsignor Fulton J. Sheen stated in on of his lectures a few months ago. The first would be a picture of the finding in the Temple. After a three-day search, Mary found Je.sus among the sages in the temple. He said to her, "'Did you not know that I must be about my Father's business?" He might well have said, "Mother, don;t you know that I cannot spend all of my time With Joseph i/l the Carpenter Shop.? My Father has sent me into this world on the suPreme business of Redemption, to make all men adopted sons of the Father." If Mary caught the full meaning of those words, she must have realized that the Fatherhood of God meant that she was to be the nother of men. A number of artists have graphically portrayed the "finding," bu there is still place for a truly great masterpiece. Less frequently seen is the portrayal of the wedding feast at Cana. How much Our Lord honored all womanhood by making his first adult public appearance at a wedding! Mary, the ever watchful mother, noticed that the wine jugs were empty, and said to Him, "They have no wine." In proof that her intercession is powerful in her role as the Universal Mother, Jesus ordered the pots filled with water and turned the liquid into Wine. Two: year later, the third scene-- almost never painted  was unfolded. One day as Jesus was approaching, some- one told Him that Mary was outside and wanted to see Him. Christ aid, "Who HIS MOTHER A REAL MADONNA Ten-year-old Edouard Capra will remember hie mother as a Madonna, for In the two bare rooms of the Capra's Cannes, France home, the youth has painted Madonnas many times, using his mother ias model. The lad was a pupil of the late Pierre Bonnard leading French artist, and each evening after finishing her work as a charwoman, Madame Capra, dressed in shabby gown, poses for her son until the last bit of light'llas left the sky. Photo NCWC. is my mother?" He then answered His own question: "Whoever does the will of my Father in heaven, she is . . . my mother." Thus Our Lord pointed out that there is such .a thing as spiritual maternity--that spiritual ties Can bind us to the Universal Mother, Just as physi- cal ties bind us-to our human mothers. The stirring climax to these three scenes, the Crucifixion, has been often recorded on canvas. Antonio Da Viterbo, Antonlazzo Romano, Barnaba Da Mo- (lena, Giannicola Dt Paolo, Lorinzetti, Luea Di Tomme-and others have por- trayed the unutterable agony of that last hour. During that time, Jesus called His mother "Woman," aud in that one-word her mo.therh<0d was expanded; she be- came the mother of every human on earth. Not only did she have a Child according to the will of the Most High but, according to that same Will, she had a world-full of children. Through the words that )llowcd, "Son; behold thy mother," - we:; obtained the most loving mother in the world---the Mother of Jesl. If there were nothing real and positive about the glory-of motherhood, would Our Lord have used HJ last ounce of energy to give her to us as a Universal Mother? Would artists for five centuries have painted.great masterpieces in her honor ? I