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Page Sixteen The CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Franco Answers Nine Questions .-For By REV. PAUL SUSSARD Special Cor,spondent, N.C.W.C. Service. k A ADRID&apos;-I have submitted a series  |y| of questions to Generalissimo Fran- cisco and have received from him the following answers. / The questions and answers are ar- ranged according to the Four Freedoms laid down in the Atlantic Charter: Free- dom of Religion: Freedom of the Press; Freedom from Fear and Freedom from Want. American Priest.Editor (1) Is there any official restriction on the freedom of worship for Protes- tants in Spain? giveb, on July 17, 1945, establishes per- manently "that nobody shall be molested by reason of religious beliefs, nor on ac- count of privately practicing his own re ligion.'" And this has been observed in Spain, not only since the law was enacted, but ever since the beginning of the National Movement; the .fact that in our Moroc- can Protectorate, Catholics, Moslems and Jew live together in a spirit of the great- eat cordiality, is proof enough of this. However, Spain is profoundly and fun- damentally a Catholic nation; practically all Spaniards are Catholics, there being only a very small minority of. non-reli- giot, s persons, who nevertheless have been ,baptized. The number of Protestants is, erefore, reduced to a very small- number of foreigners or Spaniards who haw lived outside Spain for many years, all of whom have their feedom of wor- ship guaranteed. There are, in conse- quence, a number of Protestant churches where services are freely held. The Regime does in this "sense follow the traditional Spanish policy, already proclaimed in the Constitution of the Monarchy of 1876 and still in brce in 1931, by which the State declared itself Catholic, with tolerance of worship for other cults. (2) What is the attitude of the gov- ernment toward secret fraternal organizations, such as the Masons? The principles of the Encyclical Hu- manure Genus of Pope Leo XIII are " readily accepted by the Spanish people b-=ause of their Catholic character, be- cause they live in a Catholic state, and because the Masonic ledges in Spain have aggravated the situation by their revolu- tionary, criminal and anti-Spanish con- duct. In all nationai crises, the Spanish Masons distinguished themselves by their treason to their country and their col- laboration with her foreign enemies dur- ing the-last days of the Republic. They inspired and backed the decision to burn down churches and convents. Distinguish- ed republican leaders, on account of their sense of order, were thrown out of their lodges and liquidated. Such were: Mel- quiades Alvarez, Lopez Ochoa, Salazar Alonso, Abad Condo, Rico Avello and many others, under Masonic inspiration. Although they were not numerous, they had managed to weave a web in which the country was caught. In this way an atheist and perverse minority sub- dued a great Catholic nation and handed it over to the interests of its enemies. Spanish lodges can never b e judged by the same standards as those abroad but they should he taken for what they have represented in our nation. Freedom of fhe Press (3) Does Spain freely allow the entry and circulation of foreign publi- cations? Look into any of the more important Madrid bookstores and you will see a large number of foreign books on sale, either in their native language or trans- lated into Spanish. You will also observe that in Spain you can buy foreign maga- zines and publications of all sorts, suf- ficient to please the most exacting tastes; nevertheless, it should ,not be forgOtten that we are a Catholic and, therefore, a ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: large reserves of our National Bank but ALL FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS ii they also broke into the public and pri- ii vate vaults of the banks, ransacked the ASSURED IN SPAIN, FRANCO ! churches' treasures as well as those i TELLS U. S. PRIEST-EDITOR !i private h0u. ill": ii In Madrid they did not even respect "i T HE fundamental liberties of man are guaranteed to every law- the state-controlled pawn-shops where so many poor people had pawned their small ! abiding citizen in Spain, where faith and the country's progress jewels. i are being harmonized "with the human, just and legitinmte interests All this makes it practically impossi- ii of those who hunger and thirst for justice," Genel:alissim0 Francisco ii ble to determine the exact quantity of [i Franc<) told the Rev. Palfl Bussard of St. Paul. editor of the. Cath- ii the theft. ii olic Digest and special correspondent for N.C.W.C. News Service. -:. We know that the greatest part of the i! The questions submitted by Father Bussard and the detailed il gold of the Bank of Spain went to Russia, Freedom of Religion i-answers given by Generalissimo Fl'anc.0 are contained in ttle article i and that the subversive campaigns con- following this dispatch, i! ducted against our country have .been i! In his answers, the head of the Snanish Governlnent: !i financed by Spanish gold and treasures. Declared that in Si)ain, "profoundly and fundamentally a Cath- ii The loss of those metallic reserves of :: - olic nation," there is freedom of worship for non-Catholics: :: our bank considerably aggravated the dif- A:. 6 of the Fuero de los Espanoles, _ !i Pointed to the large number of foreign books for sale in Spanish il ficult economic situation which Spain has had to endure as a consequence of her .moral country and that we cannot con- sent to the exhibition and circulation of libelous, pornographic, or anti-religious publications; also, due to the scarcity of foreign exchange and the high cost of foreign publications, preference tsgiven to good books which are in demand in intellectual and technical centers. (4) Are foreign correspondents allowed to report news without censorship? Since the international war ended, the foreign press enjoys in Spain a degree of liberty which, I think, is not surpassed in any other country. Since April, 1945, foreign correspondents can send what- ever dispatches they deem fit. You have, no doubt, been able to read in the American-press a good deal of news which is biased and hostile to-our nation and which has been sent from Spain by journalists who, despite their uncorrect conduct, have continued to practice their profession in our territory. Only four newspapermen, one of them an American, ceased to be acceptable and were asked to surrender their press cards, because they repeatedly sent out news and information of a clearly proven false and slanderous nature." If in this we have been at fault, in comparison with what is done in other countries, our fault is that we have been excessively benevolent. i bkstres; il Asserted tlmt the degree of ]iherty enjoyed by the foreign press war. This situation is being overcome i in Spain "is not surpassed in any" other country;" by the laboriousness and the firmness of Said Spaniards. "regardless of their ideals." can live freely, ii the Spanish people, and today we have  " " the satisfaction of being able to say that, "without anyone molesting them"; .. Described Spain as a count, which "has achieved internal or- ii despite that robbery, Spain has faithfully !i der and the cooperation of her citizens necessary, for success." F. complied with all her foreign economic In conclusion, Generalissimo Franco praised the American CaSh- ii -commitments, even with those of the pre- olic press "for the magnificent way" in which it has published "the ii ceding regime. i tnlth about Spain during the last two years," and he asked %meH- ii (s) Is social legislation based on the cans to be "reasonable toward Spanish affairs." He also expressed ii Papal Encyclicals? If so, will Your i! the hope that "'a more profound knowledge of SDain and Spanish  Excellency give some instances? !! affairs will deepen and broaden" the understanding "of what we il HOW does the Falange assist? are tLying to do." ii Our social legislation is so abundant ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: and important that this question can be answered here only superficially. So much same as were used by the monarchy and has been done in this field that a full- the republic, length book would be necessary for a The idea that there are any political complete answer. prisoners in Spain has been circulated There are a number of such books by through the world only by the cleverness eminent men, such as the one by Father and persistence of communist p.ropa- "Azpiazu, S.J., in which he points out the Freedom from Fear (5) Are there any political priaaners in Spain? If so, how many, and are they being released? Propaganda carried -on in bad faith has given rise to mistaken notions about political prisoners in Spain. The penal population in Spain i now practically equal to that of pre-war days. Only about 4,000 prisoners, condemned for murder and other grave crimes committed during the civil war, remain from the past revo- lution. It is, therefore, a question of common criminals who profited by the civil war and committed crimes which are punished by the penal codes of every country in the world. Regardless of their ideals, Spaniards can live freely in Spain, in peace and liberty, without anyone molesting them; but, if communists or anarchists assault banks or private properties, if they sabot- age electric plants or railways,." if they engage in kidnapping or daylight rob- berT, or if they organize gangs with such objects in view, the organizers and in- stigators are, as in any other civilized country, arrested and tried according to the laws and codes in force: laws which we have not invented, since they are the ganda. (6) Are there restrictions on civil lib- erties ? Our Fuero de los Espanoles, which is the Magna Charts of our liberties, and which was recently confirmed by popular vote as one of the fundamental "laws of the kingdom, proclaims that respect for the dignity, integrity and liberty of the human being is one of the principles of the Spanish state. Among other things, the Fuero de los Espanoles guarantees the following: re- spect for the individual and the family; education and instruction, and participa- tion in public functions through the family, the municipality and the syndi- cate; it also gltarantees the discharge of public functions, free expression of ideas, liberty and secrecy of correspond- ence, residence inside national territory, reunion and association, always accord- ing to the law. It guarantees security within the law, the prohibition of arrest except in the cases and under the form prescribed by law, and the impossibility of being con- demned except by the application of a law already in force before the commission of the crime; and the right of all Spaniards to worlc These articles can be suspended only In exceptional cases, only in part, and only for a limited time. Since their pro- mulgation they have not been suspended for a single day. Thus, tn some respects we have more .liberty, in some, less than other countries. In contrast with the faithfulness with which Spain has obserCed these guaran- tees, I can assure you that in the five years of the Republic, Spain lived in al- most perpetual suspension of constitu- tional guarantees and civil rights, and this to such a degree that the very of- ficials of public authority, respOnsibility for safeguarding and defending citizens, treacherously and vilely killed the leader of the opposition, the ex-minister Senor Calve Sotelo. Freedom from Wanf (7) What effect on the economy of Spain did the theft of money by the so-called Republican govern- ment have? How much did they steal? Has any been recovered? Those who effected that gigantic theft, not ly took away from Spain the very parallel between the precepts of the en- cyclicals and our own legislation. There is also the book of Father Valle, S.J., which has a list of the Spanish la- bor laws and institutions in defense of the workcr. Only a few days ago the "Jurados de Empresa" have been established by law, reflecting what is writren in the En- cyclical "Quadragesimo Anne": the par- ticipation in management of all those who take part in production. The Christian concept of work, which Insists on the personal dignity of him who toils, has been reflected in all Span- ish social legislation; oreover, it en- deavors to guarantee at all times the eco- nomic security of the worker, through an all-embracing system of ial insur- ance. The Catholic world should be inter- ested in becoming acquainted with this Spanish social work, which has put into practice the principles of the Papal En- cyclicals which so many Catholics, plead- Ing economic difficulties, have failed to apply. Thanks to peace and harmony within the nation. Spain has achieved in- ternal order and the cooperation of her citizens necessary for success. Falange, which has been so caiunmi-_ ated outside Spain, has a place of honor in this great enterprise, for it has en- couraged it from the very beginning, has placed it under the patronage of the church, and has defended and maintained it throughout Spain. I consider this Spanish social work one of the most far-reaching events of mod- ern times. In these hours of crisis and of Marxist defeats, of communist inCh- aces, of capitalistic failures and of social unrest, Spain harmonizes what should be eternal and indestructible: our faith and the progress of our country with the human, just and legitimate interests of those who hunger and thirst for justice. (9) Does'Your Excellency wish to make any further statement for the Cath. olio press of the United States? In the first place, I wish to express my gratitude, and that of all Spaniards, for the magnificent way the American Cath- olic press has published the truth about Spain during the last two years. I al wish to say that Spanish Catholics do their best to understand the motives which inspire Catholic life in the U.S.A.; al. (Continued on page 17} @ @ @ e e Page Sixteen The CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Franco Answers Nine Questions .-For By REV. PAUL SUSSARD Special Cor,spondent, N.C.W.C. Service. k A ADRID'-I have submitted a series  |y| of questions to Generalissimo Fran- cisco and have received from him the following answers. / The questions and answers are ar- ranged according to the Four Freedoms laid down in the Atlantic Charter: Free- dom of Religion: Freedom of the Press; Freedom from Fear and Freedom from Want. American Priest.Editor (1) Is there any official restriction on the freedom of worship for Protes- tants in Spain? giveb, on July 17, 1945, establishes per- manently "that nobody shall be molested by reason of religious beliefs, nor on ac- count of privately practicing his own re ligion.'" And this has been observed in Spain, not only since the law was enacted, but ever since the beginning of the National Movement; the .fact that in our Moroc- can Protectorate, Catholics, Moslems and Jew live together in a spirit of the great- eat cordiality, is proof enough of this. However, Spain is profoundly and fun- damentally a Catholic nation; practically all Spaniards are Catholics, there being only a very small minority of. non-reli- giot, s persons, who nevertheless have been ,baptized. The number of Protestants is, erefore, reduced to a very small- number of foreigners or Spaniards who haw lived outside Spain for many years, all of whom have their feedom of wor- ship guaranteed. There are, in conse- quence, a number of Protestant churches where services are freely held. The Regime does in this "sense follow the traditional Spanish policy, already proclaimed in the Constitution of the Monarchy of 1876 and still in brce in 1931, by which the State declared itself Catholic, with tolerance of worship for other cults. (2) What is the attitude of the gov- ernment toward secret fraternal organizations, such as the Masons? The principles of the Encyclical Hu- manure Genus of Pope Leo XIII are " readily accepted by the Spanish people b-=ause of their Catholic character, be- cause they live in a Catholic state, and because the Masonic ledges in Spain have aggravated the situation by their revolu- tionary, criminal and anti-Spanish con- duct. In all nationai crises, the Spanish Masons distinguished themselves by their treason to their country and their col- laboration with her foreign enemies dur- ing the-last days of the Republic. They inspired and backed the decision to burn down churches and convents. Distinguish- ed republican leaders, on account of their sense of order, were thrown out of their lodges and liquidated. Such were: Mel- quiades Alvarez, Lopez Ochoa, Salazar Alonso, Abad Condo, Rico Avello and many others, under Masonic inspiration. Although they were not numerous, they had managed to weave a web in which the country was caught. In this way an atheist and perverse minority sub- dued a great Catholic nation and handed it over to the interests of its enemies. Spanish lodges can never b e judged by the same standards as those abroad but they should he taken for what they have represented in our nation. Freedom of fhe Press (3) Does Spain freely allow the entry and circulation of foreign publi- cations? Look into any of the more important Madrid bookstores and you will see a large number of foreign books on sale, either in their native language or trans- lated into Spanish. You will also observe that in Spain you can buy foreign maga- zines and publications of all sorts, suf- ficient to please the most exacting tastes; nevertheless, it should ,not be forgOtten that we are a Catholic and, therefore, a ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: large reserves of our National Bank but ALL FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS ii they also broke into the public and pri- ii vate vaults of the banks, ransacked the ASSURED IN SPAIN, FRANCO ! churches' treasures as well as those i TELLS U. S. PRIEST-EDITOR !i private h0u. ill": ii In Madrid they did not even respect "i T HE fundamental liberties of man are guaranteed to every law- the state-controlled pawn-shops where so many poor people had pawned their small ! abiding citizen in Spain, where faith and the country's progress jewels. i are being harmonized "with the human, just and legitinmte interests All this makes it practically impossi- ii of those who hunger and thirst for justice," Genel:alissim0 Francisco ii ble to determine the exact quantity of [i Franc<) told the Rev. Palfl Bussard of St. Paul. editor of the. Cath- ii the theft. ii olic Digest and special correspondent for N.C.W.C. News Service. -:. We know that the greatest part of the i! The questions submitted by Father Bussard and the detailed il gold of the Bank of Spain went to Russia, Freedom of Religion i-answers given by Generalissimo Fl'anc.0 are contained in ttle article i and that the subversive campaigns con- following this dispatch, i! ducted against our country have .been i! In his answers, the head of the Snanish Governlnent: !i financed by Spanish gold and treasures. Declared that in Si)ain, "profoundly and fundamentally a Cath- ii The loss of those metallic reserves of :: - olic nation," there is freedom of worship for non-Catholics: :: our bank considerably aggravated the dif- A:. 6 of the Fuero de los Espanoles, _ !i Pointed to the large number of foreign books for sale in Spanish il ficult economic situation which Spain has had to endure as a consequence of her .moral country and that we cannot con- sent to the exhibition and circulation of libelous, pornographic, or anti-religious publications; also, due to the scarcity of foreign exchange and the high cost of foreign publications, preference tsgiven to good books which are in demand in intellectual and technical centers. (4) Are foreign correspondents allowed to report news without censorship? Since the international war ended, the foreign press enjoys in Spain a degree of liberty which, I think, is not surpassed in any other country. Since April, 1945, foreign correspondents can send what- ever dispatches they deem fit. You have, no doubt, been able to read in the American-press a good deal of news which is biased and hostile to-our nation and which has been sent from Spain by journalists who, despite their uncorrect conduct, have continued to practice their profession in our territory. Only four newspapermen, one of them an American, ceased to be acceptable and were asked to surrender their press cards, because they repeatedly sent out news and information of a clearly proven false and slanderous nature." If in this we have been at fault, in comparison with what is done in other countries, our fault is that we have been excessively benevolent. i bkstres; il Asserted tlmt the degree of ]iherty enjoyed by the foreign press war. This situation is being overcome i in Spain "is not surpassed in any" other country;" by the laboriousness and the firmness of Said Spaniards. "regardless of their ideals." can live freely, ii the Spanish people, and today we have  " " the satisfaction of being able to say that, "without anyone molesting them"; .. Described Spain as a count, which "has achieved internal or- ii despite that robbery, Spain has faithfully !i der and the cooperation of her citizens necessary, for success." F. complied with all her foreign economic In conclusion, Generalissimo Franco praised the American CaSh- ii -commitments, even with those of the pre- olic press "for the magnificent way" in which it has published "the ii ceding regime. i tnlth about Spain during the last two years," and he asked %meH- ii (s) Is social legislation based on the cans to be "reasonable toward Spanish affairs." He also expressed ii Papal Encyclicals? If so, will Your i! the hope that "'a more profound knowledge of SDain and Spanish  Excellency give some instances? !! affairs will deepen and broaden" the understanding "of what we il HOW does the Falange assist? are tLying to do." ii Our social legislation is so abundant ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: and important that this question can be answered here only superficially. So much same as were used by the monarchy and has been done in this field that a full- the republic, length book would be necessary for a The idea that there are any political complete answer. prisoners in Spain has been circulated There are a number of such books by through the world only by the cleverness eminent men, such as the one by Father and persistence of communist p.ropa- "Azpiazu, S.J., in which he points out the Freedom from Fear (5) Are there any political priaaners in Spain? If so, how many, and are they being released? Propaganda carried -on in bad faith has given rise to mistaken notions about political prisoners in Spain. The penal population in Spain i now practically equal to that of pre-war days. Only about 4,000 prisoners, condemned for murder and other grave crimes committed during the civil war, remain from the past revo- lution. It is, therefore, a question of common criminals who profited by the civil war and committed crimes which are punished by the penal codes of every country in the world. Regardless of their ideals, Spaniards can live freely in Spain, in peace and liberty, without anyone molesting them; but, if communists or anarchists assault banks or private properties, if they sabot- age electric plants or railways,." if they engage in kidnapping or daylight rob- berT, or if they organize gangs with such objects in view, the organizers and in- stigators are, as in any other civilized country, arrested and tried according to the laws and codes in force: laws which we have not invented, since they are the ganda. (6) Are there restrictions on civil lib- erties ? Our Fuero de los Espanoles, which is the Magna Charts of our liberties, and which was recently confirmed by popular vote as one of the fundamental "laws of the kingdom, proclaims that respect for the dignity, integrity and liberty of the human being is one of the principles of the Spanish state. Among other things, the Fuero de los Espanoles guarantees the following: re- spect for the individual and the family; education and instruction, and participa- tion in public functions through the family, the municipality and the syndi- cate; it also gltarantees the discharge of public functions, free expression of ideas, liberty and secrecy of correspond- ence, residence inside national territory, reunion and association, always accord- ing to the law. It guarantees security within the law, the prohibition of arrest except in the cases and under the form prescribed by law, and the impossibility of being con- demned except by the application of a law already in force before the commission of the crime; and the right of all Spaniards to worlc These articles can be suspended only In exceptional cases, only in part, and only for a limited time. Since their pro- mulgation they have not been suspended for a single day. Thus, tn some respects we have more .liberty, in some, less than other countries. In contrast with the faithfulness with which Spain has obserCed these guaran- tees, I can assure you that in the five years of the Republic, Spain lived in al- most perpetual suspension of constitu- tional guarantees and civil rights, and this to such a degree that the very of- ficials of public authority, respOnsibility for safeguarding and defending citizens, treacherously and vilely killed the leader of the opposition, the ex-minister Senor Calve Sotelo. Freedom from Wanf (7) What effect on the economy of Spain did the theft of money by the so-called Republican govern- ment have? How much did they steal? Has any been recovered? Those who effected that gigantic theft, not ly took away from Spain the very parallel between the precepts of the en- cyclicals and our own legislation. There is also the book of Father Valle, S.J., which has a list of the Spanish la- bor laws and institutions in defense of the workcr. Only a few days ago the "Jurados de Empresa" have been established by law, reflecting what is writren in the En- cyclical "Quadragesimo Anne": the par- ticipation in management of all those who take part in production. The Christian concept of work, which Insists on the personal dignity of him who toils, has been reflected in all Span- ish social legislation; oreover, it en- deavors to guarantee at all times the eco- nomic security of the worker, through an all-embracing system of ial insur- ance. The Catholic world should be inter- ested in becoming acquainted with this Spanish social work, which has put into practice the principles of the Papal En- cyclicals which so many Catholics, plead- Ing economic difficulties, have failed to apply. Thanks to peace and harmony within the nation. Spain has achieved in- ternal order and the cooperation of her citizens necessary for success. Falange, which has been so caiunmi-_ ated outside Spain, has a place of honor in this great enterprise, for it has en- couraged it from the very beginning, has placed it under the patronage of the church, and has defended and maintained it throughout Spain. I consider this Spanish social work one of the most far-reaching events of mod- ern times. In these hours of crisis and of Marxist defeats, of communist inCh- aces, of capitalistic failures and of social unrest, Spain harmonizes what should be eternal and indestructible: our faith and the progress of our country with the human, just and legitimate interests of those who hunger and thirst for justice. (9) Does'Your Excellency wish to make any further statement for the Cath. olio press of the United States? In the first place, I wish to express my gratitude, and that of all Spaniards, for the magnificent way the American Cath- olic press has published the truth about Spain during the last two years. I al wish to say that Spanish Catholics do their best to understand the motives which inspire Catholic life in the U.S.A.; al. (Continued on page 17} @ @ @ e e