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Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947
 

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The SEMINARY Where Big News Happens Quietly HIS is not a "news" story. It ts a story about St. Edward Seminary. Seminaries don't furnish copy for newspapers. Not usually. In fact the things a secular 'paper is interested in never happen out here. One might be tempted .to say noth- tug ever happens out here! :But-that would be =a serious mistake. The big things happen here all the time the really big things that are tbo big :for the world to begin to understand. ,You know, of course, since it is Christ: Q ,mas time, that the world missed the ibiggest news event in history.-Hardly anybody had heard about the world- ishaking , really cosmic event that took !place in Bethlehem. There were no re- porters there. Even Herod's official po- l.ce didn't know what was going on. And the first to reacl the scene ouldn't even rad--po0r simple.shepherds, scared half i0ut of their wits. i:iGod deals-with us in His own way. .Uually without benefit of publicity. : !So it is the nature of the seminary to .'keep an even tenor, to be regular and :-it uiet, to wear the appearance of routine -:apd monotony. Appearances are mis- :lding. Underneath the calm surface, a beneath, a vast immobile sea, there ::are strong currents at work. :The inhabitants of the seminary are linen .who live by faith. They are con- ieerned with supernatural battles, deeds, mid persons. Just as the scientist can _ind teeming life and growth in a glass f water which appears perfectly clear the unaided eye, so the seminarian can .!qok beneath the silent surface t dis- ver great spiritual realities. It is hard to appreciate what the spiritualizing presence of the seminary van mean to any locality. Recall the Bible story of :braham begging God not to destroy :d6m. God promised to spare the whole :ty if he found in it only ten holy mere ii I The SeminaryA Nazareth : The seminary is'a mold the Church ,uses to form youths into priests. The minary must form a priest who is a :'/double" for eJsus Christ. In the movies a double has to act like, look like, be like the star; he works for no name, nor fame, but only to give credit to the origi- O nal. The  priest stands in the same rela- tion to Christ. He must act like Him, BE like Him, work in His name, and to His credit. The seminary, then, is the Nazareth of the Church. Just a Christ spent thirty years in "hidden life" at Nazareth, so the Priest, His "double," must spent some years in "hidden life" in: the seminary. Very little "news" came out of Naza- reth. Jesus went there with his parents and "was subject to them." "He in- creased in wisdom, and age, and grace before God and men." The Gospel shows Him only once in public appearance. Then He let His parents look for Him while He showed His wisdom in the tem- ple. He was "about His Father's busi- lleSS." DisciplineThe Power of the Priest Very little news comes out of the sem- inary. The students go in and become subject to priests. These .seminary priests are such as (according to Plus XI) "teach priestly virtues rather by example than by words, men who are * capable of ira, parting, together with learning, a solid, m"anly, and apostolic spirit." The student Obeys these men." He obeys their regula- ti5ns, which are in reality not theirs but the church's, called the Holy Rule. T/lis rules tglis him when to get up, when to I go to bed; when to pray, when to study, when to play. The student learns to! say like Christ, "Thy will be done." He learns to obey God in the person of his superiors. He learns the. secret of obedience by studying the Gospels, by studying Christ, his model. Christ so |eyed the Father, that He obeyed Him S T. EDWARD SEMINARY, genrnore, Washington Almost the first question a boy or young man asks when he thinks about the priesthood is: W'nat is the seminary like? We at St. Edward's would like to tell you. i Ours isa seminary for the training of Diocesan Priests. It was established in 1931 at Kenmore, near Seattle, Washington. The corner stone was lead by the present Prefect of Propaganda, His Eminence Cardinal Pietro Fuma- soni-Biondi,-who was then Apostolic Delegate to theUnited States. A year later, on the feast of St. Edward the Con- lessor, the seminary was solemnly dedicated by His Eminence Cardinal Dougherty, Archbishop of Philadelphia. Founded by the late Bishop Edward J. O'Dea, the seminary has been the object of special solicitude on the part of his successor, Bishop Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M. St. Edward:s serves the seven dioceses of the Northwest: the Archdiocese of Portland, the Dioceses of Baker City,  Boise, Great Falls, Helena, Seattle, and Spokane. It is under the direction of the Fathers of St. Sulpice. Since 1939, when the first class was ordained, it has given well over 100 priests to the Northwest. It takes twelve years of schooling and training before one can be ordained to the Priesthood. At St. Edward's, the Minor Seminary (high school and junior college) and the Major Seminary (philosophy and theology) are hoJsed in the  building pictured above. This is because we are still young and small. Some day the two communities will be sep- arated. student to obey out of love, gradually generates the power of Christ in the soul of His "double." The fully-formed priest may say "The Lord is my strength . . . almighty is His name." PrayerThe Font of Wisdom Christ at Nazareth '!increased in wis- dom." His "double" in the seminary finds two ways to increase in wisdom: by prayer, and by study. "My house is a house of prayer" Christ could say, and the priest must say the same. The semi nary gives the first place to prayer at the beginning of the day, and all through the day. There is the daily Mass and Communion; there are the various vocal prayers at morning and night, before and after every exercise. But the semi- nary gives special attention to mental prayer. For God regards our hearts rather than our gifts. The-seninary teaches mental prayer with more con- cern than its class in history or science. The student learns gradually how to en gage in heart to heart conversation with I God. He forms a friendship with Christ, and as friends are wont to do, he often visits Him in simple silence. The essence of a perfect friendship is that each friend reveal himself utterly to the other. In this revealing of Christ to his "double" the student learns more than he could in a lifetime of study. Happy is the man that knows God even if he knows nothing else. The people look to the priest as their link to God. Prayer welds this link, for we read in Isaias about the man of prayer, "When thou shalt call, God will hear thee: as soon as thou speakest, He saith, Lo, here am I." StudyThe Staff of Truth Besides prayer, of course, the semi- narian must also increase in wisdom by study. Holy Scripture says, "The lips of the priests shall keep knowledge, and they (the people) shall seek the law at his mouth." For the young student the seminary provides a general education in science, history, and language. As he progresses further he begins to study the I 00EXILE I Craftsman, just and able, Housewife, kind and mild, Went in chill "December (She was bearing Child), Heeding Caesar's edict, Down to Bethlehem. No one, friend, or neighbor, Heard again of them. Wise men homeward travel Roads men seldom go; Rachel wails in Rama, Comfortless in woe. Off in sand-swept Egypt Joseph plied his trade, Mary wove a tunic, OUNDS of hammer silent, Wood chips in a mound, Newly hand-carved cradle Left upon the ground. Within, a loorr stands idle, Fire quenched and cold, Board and table tidied, Floor mats neatly rolled. People pass and wonder, Question now and then When the kin of David Will come home again. And when townfolk gather In the house of prayer, Two familiar faces "even unto death"; and Christ told His f^11 ....  Obey me "if you JOVe me." The ..... ..xe no I ong.eT_.taer ............. .........  J.ea ,playe(t _ _ O cipiine :fte sena|n*clecing "the " --Brother A. Andrew, F.S.C. art of thinking, of speaking, and of teach- ing. Finally he enters into a careful study of the Sacred sciences. He learns the Scripture, the word of God, which is "liv- ing and active, and sharper than any two-edged sword." He learns the great truths and plans of God, and the laws that follow therefrom. He also learns how men tend to gravitate, how they harden their hearts and turn away their eyes from the face o( God, and relish rather their own plans and the things of earth. He prepares to teach, to preach. and to explain God's truth, knowing that it is the one demand of truth that it b not condemned unheard. Time--To Clinch Good Habits At Nazareth Christ increased in age. In the seminary the student who begins in high school will spend twelve years. This is to form him permanently into a "'double" that will be and act like Christ. It is to form his habits. The psycholO- gist, William James, contends that, "Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would ive more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state." Holiness--The Torch of the Priest Christ at Nazareth increased in grace. His seminarians use every means to in- crease in grace. They obey, they pray, they study, they do all to adorn their souls with grace. They know that the people look to the priest to be first a cistern, as St. Bernard says, "full of holy lights and affections collected in prayer, and afterwards a canal to diffuse them among his neighbors." They know that no one will seek counsel from a man that knows not how to give counsel to himself. "Who shall seek in a sink the limpid waters of a spring?" (St. Bernard asks.) The seminarians try to do all out of love for their Friend, their Model. They know that the torch that does not burn.cannot inflame others; .nd that tp (Continued on Page 8) The SEMINARY Where Big News Happens Quietly HIS is not a "news" story. It ts a story about St. Edward Seminary. Seminaries don't furnish copy for newspapers. Not usually. In fact the things a secular 'paper is interested in never happen out here. One might be tempted .to say noth- tug ever happens out here! :But-that would be =a serious mistake. The big things happen here all the time the really big things that are tbo big :for the world to begin to understand. ,You know, of course, since it is Christ: Q ,mas time, that the world missed the ibiggest news event in history.-Hardly anybody had heard about the world- ishaking , really cosmic event that took !place in Bethlehem. There were no re- porters there. Even Herod's official po- l.ce didn't know what was going on. And the first to reacl the scene ouldn't even rad--po0r simple.shepherds, scared half i0ut of their wits. i:iGod deals-with us in His own way. .Uually without benefit of publicity. : !So it is the nature of the seminary to .'keep an even tenor, to be regular and :-it uiet, to wear the appearance of routine -:apd monotony. Appearances are mis- :lding. Underneath the calm surface, a beneath, a vast immobile sea, there ::are strong currents at work. :The inhabitants of the seminary are linen .who live by faith. They are con- ieerned with supernatural battles, deeds, mid persons. Just as the scientist can _ind teeming life and growth in a glass f water which appears perfectly clear the unaided eye, so the seminarian can .!qok beneath the silent surface t dis- ver great spiritual realities. It is hard to appreciate what the spiritualizing presence of the seminary van mean to any locality. Recall the Bible story of :braham begging God not to destroy :d6m. God promised to spare the whole :ty if he found in it only ten holy mere ii I The SeminaryA Nazareth : The seminary is'a mold the Church ,uses to form youths into priests. The minary must form a priest who is a :'/double" for eJsus Christ. In the movies a double has to act like, look like, be like the star; he works for no name, nor fame, but only to give credit to the origi- O nal. The  priest stands in the same rela- tion to Christ. He must act like Him, BE like Him, work in His name, and to His credit. The seminary, then, is the Nazareth of the Church. Just a Christ spent thirty years in "hidden life" at Nazareth, so the Priest, His "double," must spent some years in "hidden life" in: the seminary. Very little "news" came out of Naza- reth. Jesus went there with his parents and "was subject to them." "He in- creased in wisdom, and age, and grace before God and men." The Gospel shows Him only once in public appearance. Then He let His parents look for Him while He showed His wisdom in the tem- ple. He was "about His Father's busi- lleSS." DisciplineThe Power of the Priest Very little news comes out of the sem- inary. The students go in and become subject to priests. These .seminary priests are such as (according to Plus XI) "teach priestly virtues rather by example than by words, men who are * capable of ira, parting, together with learning, a solid, m"anly, and apostolic spirit." The student Obeys these men." He obeys their regula- ti5ns, which are in reality not theirs but the church's, called the Holy Rule. T/lis rules tglis him when to get up, when to I go to bed; when to pray, when to study, when to play. The student learns to! say like Christ, "Thy will be done." He learns to obey God in the person of his superiors. He learns the. secret of obedience by studying the Gospels, by studying Christ, his model. Christ so |eyed the Father, that He obeyed Him S T. EDWARD SEMINARY, genrnore, Washington Almost the first question a boy or young man asks when he thinks about the priesthood is: W'nat is the seminary like? We at St. Edward's would like to tell you. i Ours isa seminary for the training of Diocesan Priests. It was established in 1931 at Kenmore, near Seattle, Washington. The corner stone was lead by the present Prefect of Propaganda, His Eminence Cardinal Pietro Fuma- soni-Biondi,-who was then Apostolic Delegate to theUnited States. A year later, on the feast of St. Edward the Con- lessor, the seminary was solemnly dedicated by His Eminence Cardinal Dougherty, Archbishop of Philadelphia. Founded by the late Bishop Edward J. O'Dea, the seminary has been the object of special solicitude on the part of his successor, Bishop Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M. St. Edward:s serves the seven dioceses of the Northwest: the Archdiocese of Portland, the Dioceses of Baker City,  Boise, Great Falls, Helena, Seattle, and Spokane. It is under the direction of the Fathers of St. Sulpice. Since 1939, when the first class was ordained, it has given well over 100 priests to the Northwest. It takes twelve years of schooling and training before one can be ordained to the Priesthood. At St. Edward's, the Minor Seminary (high school and junior college) and the Major Seminary (philosophy and theology) are hoJsed in the  building pictured above. This is because we are still young and small. Some day the two communities will be sep- arated. student to obey out of love, gradually generates the power of Christ in the soul of His "double." The fully-formed priest may say "The Lord is my strength . . . almighty is His name." PrayerThe Font of Wisdom Christ at Nazareth '!increased in wis- dom." His "double" in the seminary finds two ways to increase in wisdom: by prayer, and by study. "My house is a house of prayer" Christ could say, and the priest must say the same. The semi nary gives the first place to prayer at the beginning of the day, and all through the day. There is the daily Mass and Communion; there are the various vocal prayers at morning and night, before and after every exercise. But the semi- nary gives special attention to mental prayer. For God regards our hearts rather than our gifts. The-seninary teaches mental prayer with more con- cern than its class in history or science. The student learns gradually how to en gage in heart to heart conversation with I God. He forms a friendship with Christ, and as friends are wont to do, he often visits Him in simple silence. The essence of a perfect friendship is that each friend reveal himself utterly to the other. In this revealing of Christ to his "double" the student learns more than he could in a lifetime of study. Happy is the man that knows God even if he knows nothing else. The people look to the priest as their link to God. Prayer welds this link, for we read in Isaias about the man of prayer, "When thou shalt call, God will hear thee: as soon as thou speakest, He saith, Lo, here am I." StudyThe Staff of Truth Besides prayer, of course, the semi- narian must also increase in wisdom by study. Holy Scripture says, "The lips of the priests shall keep knowledge, and they (the people) shall seek the law at his mouth." For the young student the seminary provides a general education in science, history, and language. As he progresses further he begins to study the I 00EXILE I Craftsman, just and able, Housewife, kind and mild, Went in chill "December (She was bearing Child), Heeding Caesar's edict, Down to Bethlehem. No one, friend, or neighbor, Heard again of them. Wise men homeward travel Roads men seldom go; Rachel wails in Rama, Comfortless in woe. Off in sand-swept Egypt Joseph plied his trade, Mary wove a tunic, OUNDS of hammer silent, Wood chips in a mound, Newly hand-carved cradle Left upon the ground. Within, a loorr stands idle, Fire quenched and cold, Board and table tidied, Floor mats neatly rolled. People pass and wonder, Question now and then When the kin of David Will come home again. And when townfolk gather In the house of prayer, Two familiar faces "even unto death"; and Christ told His f^11 ....  Obey me "if you JOVe me." The ..... ..xe no I ong.eT_.taer ............. .........  J.ea ,playe(t _ _ O cipiine :fte sena|n*clecing "the " --Brother A. Andrew, F.S.C. art of thinking, of speaking, and of teach- ing. Finally he enters into a careful study of the Sacred sciences. He learns the Scripture, the word of God, which is "liv- ing and active, and sharper than any two-edged sword." He learns the great truths and plans of God, and the laws that follow therefrom. He also learns how men tend to gravitate, how they harden their hearts and turn away their eyes from the face o( God, and relish rather their own plans and the things of earth. He prepares to teach, to preach. and to explain God's truth, knowing that it is the one demand of truth that it b not condemned unheard. Time--To Clinch Good Habits At Nazareth Christ increased in age. In the seminary the student who begins in high school will spend twelve years. This is to form him permanently into a "'double" that will be and act like Christ. It is to form his habits. The psycholO- gist, William James, contends that, "Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would ive more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state." Holiness--The Torch of the Priest Christ at Nazareth increased in grace. His seminarians use every means to in- crease in grace. They obey, they pray, they study, they do all to adorn their souls with grace. They know that the people look to the priest to be first a cistern, as St. Bernard says, "full of holy lights and affections collected in prayer, and afterwards a canal to diffuse them among his neighbors." They know that no one will seek counsel from a man that knows not how to give counsel to himself. "Who shall seek in a sink the limpid waters of a spring?" (St. Bernard asks.) The seminarians try to do all out of love for their Friend, their Model. They know that the torch that does not burn.cannot inflame others; .nd that tp (Continued on Page 8)