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December 12, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947
 

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Friday, December 12, @. 1947 CATHO[IC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Page-Severt  @ @ COLOGNE SOcy, but sweet--that's Potpourg Cologne--a flowers-and-spice flagrance for every lady with a romantic heart. iolpourri Cologne--l.00 and 2.00 Bath Oi1--1.25 .Dusting Powder--l.00 Talc Mitt---1.00 all prices plus fax NcGlenn's A PLEASANT PLACE TO SHOP Auburn- Kent -- Burien C. A. DONAHUE O : "Your Home Finder" fz :NEAR HOLY NAMES 4 CORNER BEDROOMS 2 FULL BATHS A large living room, ban- quet s i z e dining room, convenient kitchen, beau- tiful golden oak floors, full basement with play- l"oom, automatic oil bur- nor, large level lot, gar- age on alley. Priced reas- onably. Call us for more information, PR. 2030 C. A. DONAHUE - REALTOR 405 15th Ave. N. PR. 2030 , r ......... OIL, I I MILLION CATHOLICS OGDENSBURG CATHEDRAL RUINED BY FLAMES IN LANDS WHERE ARABS DOMINATE CINCINNATI. -- A timely map w i t h accompanying statistics showing the numerical position of the Church in the Middle Eastern countries, Arab stronghold and a' center of world interest in view of the recent United Nations de- cision to partition Palestine, has been released here at the Catholic Student Mission Crusade head- quarters. The statistics disclose that in 10 countries, six of" which arc under control of the Arab League, there is a total population of 69,384,881, including a total of 1,112,500 Cath- olics. The CSMC .breaks down the pop- ulation figures as follows: Egypt, total 17,423,000, Catholics 227,100; Iran 15,055,115, Catholics 12,000; Iraq 3,560,456, Catholics, 68,900; Lebanon 1,025,000, Catholics 540,- 000; Palestine 1,500,000, Catholics, 125,000; Saudi-Arabia 5,20,000, number of Catholics unknown; Sy- ria 2,800,000, Catholics 110,000; Trans-Jordan 300,000, Catholics, !10,000; Turkey 18,971,300, Catho- lics 17,500; and Yemen 3,500,000, number of Catholics unknown. The map lists the following countries as under control of the Arab League: Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Trans-Jordan, Saudi-Arabia' and Yemen. EDMONTON PASTOR NAME ARCHBISHOP OF REGINA, SASK, OTTAWA, Dec. 10.--(NC) "Ap- pointment of Msgr. Michael C. O'Neill, rector of St. Joseph Cathedral at Edmonton, Albert, by Hs Holiness Pope Pins XH to be Archbishop of Regina, has been announced by Archbishop Ilde- brando Antoniutti, Apostolic Dele- gate to Canada and Newfound- land. The Archbishop-designate, who is 48 and distinguished himself in both World Wars, will succeed the late Archbishop Peter Joseph Mon- ahan in th Regina archdiocese. In World War I, the Archbishop- designate served in the ranks, was wounded in action and was award- ed the Military Medal for gal- lantry. He was ordained in 1928. At the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted as a chaplain and served f6r seven years. At the time of his retirement in 1946, he was the principal Catholic chaplain of the Canadian Army. He was dec- orated by King George VI a's an officer of the Order of the British Empire. OTTAWA, .Dec. &--(NC)--Ap- point2nent of Msgr. Michael Cor- nelius O'NeiLL, 48-year-old rector of St. Joseph Cathedral, Edmon- ton, is the fourth appointment of a rector of the Edmonton cathedral parish to the Canadian Hierarchy. Other former rectors of the Ed- monton Cathedral who were ap- pointed Bishops from that post are His Eminence James Cardinal Mc- Gulganj Archbishop of Toronto; retired Bishop C. L. Nelligan of Pembroke, and Bishop E. Q. Jen- nings of Kamloops, B. C. 124 CATHOLIC C HA'LMNS SERVE VETERAN HOSPITALS WASHINGTON Dec. 10.(NC) ---Seventy-two full time Catholic chaplains and 70on part time duty were among the more thah 400 clergymen on duty in Veterans' Administration hospitals a n d homes throughout the United States as of October 1, it was an- nounced here by Chaplain A. J. McKelway, director of the VA's chaplaincy service. PADDEN & MORIARTY Attorneys 1212 American Building Seattle, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF KING In the Matter of the Estate of Helen Donley, Deceased. In Probate.--No. 102911.--Notice To Creditors. Notice is hereby given that the un- rdersignecl has been appointed and has qummeu as aarmnistrator of the estate of Helen Ddnley, Deceased; "that all persons having claims against said de- ceased are hereby required to serve  the same, duly verified, on said George I-L Jerread or his attorneys of record at the address below stated, and file the same with the Clerk of said CouP, to- gether wtthproof of such service with- in six months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the same will be barred. Date of first publication November 23 1947. ' GEORGE H. JERREAD. Administrator of said Estate. .... ,m'   I I I . i I 1212 American Buildihg, Seattle, Wash. Ull V. Irl: fHi:AH IPADDE  ,,OR.R. FIILll ILL LIILI'UI I Attorneys for Estate, .... -- l" 1212 American Building, . " , Seattle. Wash. L / Date of final publication Dee. 12, 1 . I ltT. I blnofl00 m- D00i LQUIS'r * ,J'0000nns I: : FUNERAL00 DIRECTORS ! j ]ESPECIALLY EQUIPPED FOR CATHOLIC FUNERALS | o cct BeUingham Phone "/76 ] 21Olr.p ' , I The 95-year-old St. Mar)s Cathedral, in Ogdensburg, N. Y., is  complete loss from fire of undeter- mined origin. Loss is estimated at $700,000. Only the sacred vessels and a few furnishings were saved. Despite repeated attempts by priests and firemen it was impossible to reach the Blessed Sacrament un- til four hours after the fire started. Pictures show the fire raging in the 150-foot tower, and the ruins of the main altar. Plans for rebuilding the cathedral were announced Sunday by Bisho p Bryan J. McEnte- gart. Dutch Ready to Grant Indonesia Independence Soon, Party Leader Says BY ELISE LAVELLE (New York Correspondent, N.C.W.C. News Service) NEW YORK, Dec. 9--Holland is prepared to "establish the Un- ited States of Indonesia as an in- dependent State'within the short- est possible time compatible with ensuring order and safety for its citizens," Dr. Emanuel Sassen, vice president of the Catholic Peo- ple's Party of the Netherlands and a member of the Second Chamber of the Dutch Parliament, said here in an exclusive interview discuss- ing the Indonesian question. "L view of the democratic and progressive character of our Gov- ernment and the parliamentary majority," Dr. Sassen said, 'I may say that I am surprised sometimes at the facility with which some ,arts.of American opinion tend to regard the Netherlands policy in Indonesia as that of an old-fash- ioned colonial power." Progressive Policy Dr.-Sassen said the attitude of the Catholic Party toward Indon- esia is based "on moral principles as well as the inescapable respon- sibility of the Netherlands for en- suring order and safety for hu- man lives and property" in the process of Indonesia's "speedy evo- lution toward independence." "I should like to assure you," he said, "as a member of the Catholic People's Party, which has a major- ity in Parliament, that there is no discrepancy between the democrat- ic- and socially progressive tenden- t RED POLISH OlllZ POLISH PRIESTS: OH cies in our internal policy and our attitude toward the independence of Indonesia. On the contrary, re- vival of colonialism would find no ground to stand on in our political community." Dr. Sassen was active in the un- derground during the German oc- cupation of Holland and was im- prisoned by them as a hostage for nearly two ,years. Participating in preparatory discussions for the or- ganization of the United Nations in London in 1945, he proposed a permanent committee of the As- sembly. He has been a delegate for the past two years. Requiem Mass For MARYSVILRequiezn Mass was offered Nov. 29 for Mrs. Lou- ise Shelton Fryberg, 77, at St. Anne Church, Tulalip, with Father Foley officiating. Mrs. Fryl0erg died at her home November 25. A former student of the Tuia- lip Mission School  Mrs. Fryberg is survived by her husband, An- drew; three spas, Abraham, Mar- tin and Raymond, all of Tulalip; four daughters, Mrs. Christine Williams and Mrs. Catherine Hatch, Tulalip, Mrs. Iris Johnson, Sequim and Mrs. Winifred Miteh/ll, La- Conner; her mother, Mrs. Eliza- beth Shelton, Tulalip; a brother, Charles, Tulalip, and 27 grand- children. Burial was in Mission Beach cemetery. CATHOLIC LEADERS FAVOR FAMILY ALLOWANCE LAW New York Senator Is Pre- paring Bill For Congress (N.C.W.C. News Service) WASHINGTON, Dec. 8. Intro- duction of legislation which would set up a Family Allowance Act, a project which long has been fav- ored .by many Catholic leaders is being contemplated by Senator Robert F. Wagner, of New York, it has been learned here. Senator VCag-ner has assigned a staff, headed by Joseph P. MeMur- ray, his administrative assistant, to study the family allowance plans of a number of other coun- tries, notably the Canadian sys- tem, which has been in operation since 1945, and to gather the re- action of U. S. groups to such a project. In his search for opinions, Mr. McMurray plans to canvass the na- tion's outstanding religious labor, social welfare and kindred groups. A pamphlet entitled "Family Allowances." prepared by the Rev. Dr. Edgar Schmiedeler, O.S.B., and 3ublished by the Family Life Bu- reau of the National Catholic Wel- fare Conference, embodies a study of the Catholic reaction to such a project. Pope Pins XI Quoted M A Fryb The pamphlet recalls the words rs, . erg of the late Pope Plus XI in his i noted Encyclical "On Reconstruct- ing The Social Order": "very, ef- I fort must therefore be made that Ira,hers of families receive a wage I sufficient to meet adequately or- t dinary domestic needs. If in the 'present state of society this is not Lingayen Cathedral Ruins Testify In War Damage Claim By REV. PATRICK O'CONNOR i that Japanese troops had concert- (Special Correspondent, N.C.W.C. ,rated themselves and their ex- News Service) plosives in the church. So the | INGAYEN, Philippines, Dec. 11. [naval guns were trained on the Tall grasses and young trees [great grey walls and tower, easily are growing in the sanctuary of[visible from the bay. Shell after the cathedral here. l she]l tore into the cathedral, Bish- The historic, once-massive op's house and priests  rectory. church is still the roofless ruin to Fathers Dermot Feeney, James A. which American shells reduced it McDevitt and Martin Forde of St. nearly three years ago. Columban's, in charge of the par- Lingayen, 150 miles north of ish, witnessed the first hits and Manila, is capital of populous saw the flames spurt across the Pangasinan province. Its cathe- timbers. They had narrow es- dral, 200 "years old, was built for cap es. the ges, as you can see from the The U. S. forces landed, to broken walls, four feet thick, receive a tumultuous welcome On a Christmas night Lingayen and to start their drive on Ma- cathedral used to be crowded with nila. An officer in the Engi- neers, declaring that the church ruins would be useless anyhow, put demolition charges in one of the remaining walls. He wanted the broken stones to build a bridge. Father Feeney wanted to pre serve what had survived the shell- ing. The officer insisted. The wall was blown up, and truck- loads of debris, down to the very foundations of the cathedral, were taken away. The officer left 3,000 pesos in payment for it. When peace came, the griests collected money from Americans and Filipinos to put up a tempo- rary church of straw and bamboo. Then a typhoon" blew the tootoff. The Rev. John Novak of Union- town, Pc., and the Roy. James O'Kane of Providence, R. I., newly arrived Columbian, put it on again. Three times every Sunday, 1,000 Lingayen Catholics crowd into that big straw shed for Mass. Destruction of churches was inevitable in the liberation of the Philippines. Lives of soldiers axe more valuable t h a n buildings. But the people feel their loss just the same and wonder when or how their churches will he re- stored. Lingayen cathedral is only one of scores of churches and schools similarly destroyed in the Islands. 0nly after February 29, 1948, will it be even known how much money will he left over, from pri- PASTORAL LETTER 00o persons. Every Sunday it . was filled for four Masses. It was the church for the huge parish of fJkTOWICE, Poland--(IC) --130'000 soulS.mostlyTheYof bamboo,had outlyingwhere Since the issuing and publishing !chapels, Mass was also celebrated on Sun- of the last Pastoral letter of the[days. The best of these chapels, Polish Hierarchy in the churches of Poland, the secret police has .in- built for .tudents, was likewise creased greatly its efforts to garb- hit by shells. er documents against the Polish Soon afzer Christmas, 194  clergy and to prepare "proofs" of electrifying news ran through alleged anti-state activities on the town and barios (villages). part of the priests. American ships were entering For the past few weeks officials Lingven Gulf, where the Japa of the secret police have been vis- nose had entered four years be- tting pastors and priests attached fore. Soon the liberating forces to schools in Silesia and demand- would land! ing that they sign "confessions," But first came the preliminar concerning the text of the Hier- shelling by the fleet. Actually, archy's Pastoral Letter. only eleven Japanese remained in Among the questions put to the the town. The main forces had priests b3f the. operatives, are the withdrawn. But erroneous infor- following: Is religion persecuted motion had apparently been given in Poland? Do the communists hinder the faithful in their relig- ious practices? Do they force the people to belong to the Commun- ist Party Do they remove relig- ion from the schools? There have already been in- stances of arrests of priests for answers which were not friendly to. th e communists. | N S U R e D S A V l N G $ Church Losing Ground in Scotland--Waning Irish H'O' M l [ Immigration Blame L 0 A N S Scotland today has about 625,000 Catholics and 900 priests among a population of about 5,000,000 but the church is losing ground because of the dammJng of the flow of Irish immigrants, Brother Clare, headmaster Ct St. Mungo Acad- emy, of the Passionist Fathers, told a Glasgow meeting. Fifty years after Ireland's fam- ine Scotland's Catholic population numbered 370,000 with 350 priests, but immigration waned at the be- ginn'ng of this century and has since stopped altogether. always feasible, social justice de- mands that reforms be introduced without delay which will guaran- tee every adult working man just such a wage. In this connection We might utter a word of praise for various systems, devised and attempted in practice, by which an increased wage is paid in view of increased family burdens, and a special provision is n-ado for .a special need." Canadian System A survey has disclosed that 39 nations now hay4: a family allow- ance plan in effect. Under the Canadian system, families with a yearly income of $3,600 or less a year are eligible for benefits. The first child of such a family re- ceives a $5-per-month allowance, while a family with two children receives a $7.50-per-month allow- ance.i Each addition to the family means an extra allowance. U, S, SUPREME COURT CONSIDERS ATHEIST'S APPEAL (Continued from Page 1) Stgtes Supreme Court, is as follows: That all materials and books, as well as incidental expenses, in con- nection with *.he program, are pro- vided by the various religious groups participating in the pro- gram; that children are admitted to religious instruction classes only upon the express written re- quest of parents and then only to classes designated by the parents; that classes are conducted in the grades for 30 minutes each week and in the Junior High School for 45 minutes each week; that com- petent teachers are provided by the participating religious groups; that school rooms, not required for school purposes, are made available because of the traffic hazards involved in transferring children to other available build- ings remote from the schools; and that classes are scheduled so as not to interfere in any way with the regular public school classes. Intervenors The Synagogue Council of Amer- ica, through its attorney, filed a brief deploring Mrs. McCollum's use of the case to advance her point of view but arguing that re, ligious teaching should not be given in public schools. Other groups filing briefs opposing the hampaign plan were a committee uf the Southern, Northern and Na- tional Baptist Conventions, the Seventh D a y Adventists, the American Unitarian Association, and the American Civil Liberties Union. The Protestant Council of New York came into the case to defend the released time plan as estab- lished in Champaign. Another brief supporting the school board was filed by the attorney general of Illinois. Justice Frank Murphy, who is sick, did not sit at the hearing. Justice William 0. Douglas left the bench soon after the argument Cosco Step Stool For Throughout-the-Years Convenience Give her this deluxe model for a gift of pretty usefulness! Chrome legs, padded seat, back. Red, blue, white, black, green, and yellow. 15.75 housewares, third floor &'0000son's Greetings Oil Union Company Of California 2901 Western Ave. Seattle, Wash. MAin 1251 Christmas Trees MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS Two Locations 15th Ave. No. & E. Mercer 19th Ave. No. & E. Republicaw THE GEMILL BROS. Reserve Your Tree by Calling PR. 5817 E. W. WALDAL PAINT!NG CO INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL NEW LOCATION 4015 Stone Way or-ranking war damage payments, !began, but came back later in the for such claims as churches and afternoon. non-public schools. Meanwhile the The court, after hearing at- Church is barred from borrowing torneys for two hours, took the from the governmental Recon- case under advisement. It is not struction Finance Corporation. expected that a decision will be Today, hvo and one-half )'ears rendered until after the first of afler the war, many Catholics, l the year. American as well as Filipino, I feel that Lingayan cathedral I represents a multiple claim that ' Fortitude is what helps some by now should be covered by i people to go through life hearing more than tropical weeds. I the trials of others. ME. 3613 Friday, December 12, @. 1947 CATHO[IC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Page-Severt  @ @ COLOGNE SOcy, but sweet--that's Potpourg Cologne--a flowers-and-spice flagrance for every lady with a romantic heart. iolpourri Cologne--l.00 and 2.00 Bath Oi1--1.25 .Dusting Powder--l.00 Talc Mitt---1.00 all prices plus fax NcGlenn's A PLEASANT PLACE TO SHOP Auburn- Kent -- Burien C. A. DONAHUE O : "Your Home Finder" fz :NEAR HOLY NAMES 4 CORNER BEDROOMS 2 FULL BATHS A large living room, ban- quet s i z e dining room, convenient kitchen, beau- tiful golden oak floors, full basement with play- l"oom, automatic oil bur- nor, large level lot, gar- age on alley. Priced reas- onably. Call us for more information, PR. 2030 C. A. DONAHUE - REALTOR 405 15th Ave. N. PR. 2030 , r ......... OIL, I I MILLION CATHOLICS OGDENSBURG CATHEDRAL RUINED BY FLAMES IN LANDS WHERE ARABS DOMINATE CINCINNATI. -- A timely map w i t h accompanying statistics showing the numerical position of the Church in the Middle Eastern countries, Arab stronghold and a' center of world interest in view of the recent United Nations de- cision to partition Palestine, has been released here at the Catholic Student Mission Crusade head- quarters. The statistics disclose that in 10 countries, six of" which arc under control of the Arab League, there is a total population of 69,384,881, including a total of 1,112,500 Cath- olics. The CSMC .breaks down the pop- ulation figures as follows: Egypt, total 17,423,000, Catholics 227,100; Iran 15,055,115, Catholics 12,000; Iraq 3,560,456, Catholics, 68,900; Lebanon 1,025,000, Catholics 540,- 000; Palestine 1,500,000, Catholics, 125,000; Saudi-Arabia 5,20,000, number of Catholics unknown; Sy- ria 2,800,000, Catholics 110,000; Trans-Jordan 300,000, Catholics, !10,000; Turkey 18,971,300, Catho- lics 17,500; and Yemen 3,500,000, number of Catholics unknown. The map lists the following countries as under control of the Arab League: Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Trans-Jordan, Saudi-Arabia' and Yemen. EDMONTON PASTOR NAME ARCHBISHOP OF REGINA, SASK, OTTAWA, Dec. 10.--(NC) "Ap- pointment of Msgr. Michael C. O'Neill, rector of St. Joseph Cathedral at Edmonton, Albert, by Hs Holiness Pope Pins XH to be Archbishop of Regina, has been announced by Archbishop Ilde- brando Antoniutti, Apostolic Dele- gate to Canada and Newfound- land. The Archbishop-designate, who is 48 and distinguished himself in both World Wars, will succeed the late Archbishop Peter Joseph Mon- ahan in th Regina archdiocese. In World War I, the Archbishop- designate served in the ranks, was wounded in action and was award- ed the Military Medal for gal- lantry. He was ordained in 1928. At the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted as a chaplain and served f6r seven years. At the time of his retirement in 1946, he was the principal Catholic chaplain of the Canadian Army. He was dec- orated by King George VI a's an officer of the Order of the British Empire. OTTAWA, .Dec. &--(NC)--Ap- point2nent of Msgr. Michael Cor- nelius O'NeiLL, 48-year-old rector of St. Joseph Cathedral, Edmon- ton, is the fourth appointment of a rector of the Edmonton cathedral parish to the Canadian Hierarchy. Other former rectors of the Ed- monton Cathedral who were ap- pointed Bishops from that post are His Eminence James Cardinal Mc- Gulganj Archbishop of Toronto; retired Bishop C. L. Nelligan of Pembroke, and Bishop E. Q. Jen- nings of Kamloops, B. C. 124 CATHOLIC C HA'LMNS SERVE VETERAN HOSPITALS WASHINGTON Dec. 10.(NC) ---Seventy-two full time Catholic chaplains and 70on part time duty were among the more thah 400 clergymen on duty in Veterans' Administration hospitals a n d homes throughout the United States as of October 1, it was an- nounced here by Chaplain A. J. McKelway, director of the VA's chaplaincy service. PADDEN & MORIARTY Attorneys 1212 American Building Seattle, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF KING In the Matter of the Estate of Helen Donley, Deceased. In Probate.--No. 102911.--Notice To Creditors. Notice is hereby given that the un- rdersignecl has been appointed and has qummeu as aarmnistrator of the estate of Helen Ddnley, Deceased; "that all persons having claims against said de- ceased are hereby required to serve  the same, duly verified, on said George I-L Jerread or his attorneys of record at the address below stated, and file the same with the Clerk of said CouP, to- gether wtthproof of such service with- in six months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the same will be barred. Date of first publication November 23 1947. ' GEORGE H. JERREAD. Administrator of said Estate. .... ,m'   I I I . i I 1212 American Buildihg, Seattle, Wash. Ull V. Irl: fHi:AH IPADDE  ,,OR.R. FIILll ILL LIILI'UI I Attorneys for Estate, .... -- l" 1212 American Building, . " , Seattle. Wash. L / Date of final publication Dee. 12, 1 . I ltT. I blnofl00 m- D00i LQUIS'r * ,J'0000nns I: : FUNERAL00 DIRECTORS ! j ]ESPECIALLY EQUIPPED FOR CATHOLIC FUNERALS | o cct BeUingham Phone "/76 ] 21Olr.p ' , I The 95-year-old St. Mar)s Cathedral, in Ogdensburg, N. Y., is  complete loss from fire of undeter- mined origin. Loss is estimated at $700,000. Only the sacred vessels and a few furnishings were saved. Despite repeated attempts by priests and firemen it was impossible to reach the Blessed Sacrament un- til four hours after the fire started. Pictures show the fire raging in the 150-foot tower, and the ruins of the main altar. Plans for rebuilding the cathedral were announced Sunday by Bisho p Bryan J. McEnte- gart. Dutch Ready to Grant Indonesia Independence Soon, Party Leader Says BY ELISE LAVELLE (New York Correspondent, N.C.W.C. News Service) NEW YORK, Dec. 9--Holland is prepared to "establish the Un- ited States of Indonesia as an in- dependent State'within the short- est possible time compatible with ensuring order and safety for its citizens," Dr. Emanuel Sassen, vice president of the Catholic Peo- ple's Party of the Netherlands and a member of the Second Chamber of the Dutch Parliament, said here in an exclusive interview discuss- ing the Indonesian question. "L view of the democratic and progressive character of our Gov- ernment and the parliamentary majority," Dr. Sassen said, 'I may say that I am surprised sometimes at the facility with which some ,arts.of American opinion tend to regard the Netherlands policy in Indonesia as that of an old-fash- ioned colonial power." Progressive Policy Dr.-Sassen said the attitude of the Catholic Party toward Indon- esia is based "on moral principles as well as the inescapable respon- sibility of the Netherlands for en- suring order and safety for hu- man lives and property" in the process of Indonesia's "speedy evo- lution toward independence." "I should like to assure you," he said, "as a member of the Catholic People's Party, which has a major- ity in Parliament, that there is no discrepancy between the democrat- ic- and socially progressive tenden- t RED POLISH OlllZ POLISH PRIESTS: OH cies in our internal policy and our attitude toward the independence of Indonesia. On the contrary, re- vival of colonialism would find no ground to stand on in our political community." Dr. Sassen was active in the un- derground during the German oc- cupation of Holland and was im- prisoned by them as a hostage for nearly two ,years. Participating in preparatory discussions for the or- ganization of the United Nations in London in 1945, he proposed a permanent committee of the As- sembly. He has been a delegate for the past two years. Requiem Mass For MARYSVILRequiezn Mass was offered Nov. 29 for Mrs. Lou- ise Shelton Fryberg, 77, at St. Anne Church, Tulalip, with Father Foley officiating. Mrs. Fryl0erg died at her home November 25. A former student of the Tuia- lip Mission School  Mrs. Fryberg is survived by her husband, An- drew; three spas, Abraham, Mar- tin and Raymond, all of Tulalip; four daughters, Mrs. Christine Williams and Mrs. Catherine Hatch, Tulalip, Mrs. Iris Johnson, Sequim and Mrs. Winifred Miteh/ll, La- Conner; her mother, Mrs. Eliza- beth Shelton, Tulalip; a brother, Charles, Tulalip, and 27 grand- children. Burial was in Mission Beach cemetery. CATHOLIC LEADERS FAVOR FAMILY ALLOWANCE LAW New York Senator Is Pre- paring Bill For Congress (N.C.W.C. News Service) WASHINGTON, Dec. 8. Intro- duction of legislation which would set up a Family Allowance Act, a project which long has been fav- ored .by many Catholic leaders is being contemplated by Senator Robert F. Wagner, of New York, it has been learned here. Senator VCag-ner has assigned a staff, headed by Joseph P. MeMur- ray, his administrative assistant, to study the family allowance plans of a number of other coun- tries, notably the Canadian sys- tem, which has been in operation since 1945, and to gather the re- action of U. S. groups to such a project. In his search for opinions, Mr. McMurray plans to canvass the na- tion's outstanding religious labor, social welfare and kindred groups. A pamphlet entitled "Family Allowances." prepared by the Rev. Dr. Edgar Schmiedeler, O.S.B., and 3ublished by the Family Life Bu- reau of the National Catholic Wel- fare Conference, embodies a study of the Catholic reaction to such a project. Pope Pins XI Quoted M A Fryb The pamphlet recalls the words rs, . erg of the late Pope Plus XI in his i noted Encyclical "On Reconstruct- ing The Social Order": "very, ef- I fort must therefore be made that Ira,hers of families receive a wage I sufficient to meet adequately or- t dinary domestic needs. If in the 'present state of society this is not Lingayen Cathedral Ruins Testify In War Damage Claim By REV. PATRICK O'CONNOR i that Japanese troops had concert- (Special Correspondent, N.C.W.C. ,rated themselves and their ex- News Service) plosives in the church. So the | INGAYEN, Philippines, Dec. 11. [naval guns were trained on the Tall grasses and young trees [great grey walls and tower, easily are growing in the sanctuary of[visible from the bay. Shell after the cathedral here. l she]l tore into the cathedral, Bish- The historic, once-massive op's house and priests  rectory. church is still the roofless ruin to Fathers Dermot Feeney, James A. which American shells reduced it McDevitt and Martin Forde of St. nearly three years ago. Columban's, in charge of the par- Lingayen, 150 miles north of ish, witnessed the first hits and Manila, is capital of populous saw the flames spurt across the Pangasinan province. Its cathe- timbers. They had narrow es- dral, 200 "years old, was built for cap es. the ges, as you can see from the The U. S. forces landed, to broken walls, four feet thick, receive a tumultuous welcome On a Christmas night Lingayen and to start their drive on Ma- cathedral used to be crowded with nila. An officer in the Engi- neers, declaring that the church ruins would be useless anyhow, put demolition charges in one of the remaining walls. He wanted the broken stones to build a bridge. Father Feeney wanted to pre serve what had survived the shell- ing. The officer insisted. The wall was blown up, and truck- loads of debris, down to the very foundations of the cathedral, were taken away. The officer left 3,000 pesos in payment for it. When peace came, the griests collected money from Americans and Filipinos to put up a tempo- rary church of straw and bamboo. Then a typhoon" blew the tootoff. The Rev. John Novak of Union- town, Pc., and the Roy. James O'Kane of Providence, R. I., newly arrived Columbian, put it on again. Three times every Sunday, 1,000 Lingayen Catholics crowd into that big straw shed for Mass. Destruction of churches was inevitable in the liberation of the Philippines. Lives of soldiers axe more valuable t h a n buildings. But the people feel their loss just the same and wonder when or how their churches will he re- stored. Lingayen cathedral is only one of scores of churches and schools similarly destroyed in the Islands. 0nly after February 29, 1948, will it be even known how much money will he left over, from pri- PASTORAL LETTER 00o persons. Every Sunday it . was filled for four Masses. It was the church for the huge parish of fJkTOWICE, Poland--(IC) --130'000 soulS.mostlyTheYof bamboo,had outlyingwhere Since the issuing and publishing !chapels, Mass was also celebrated on Sun- of the last Pastoral letter of the[days. The best of these chapels, Polish Hierarchy in the churches of Poland, the secret police has .in- built for .tudents, was likewise creased greatly its efforts to garb- hit by shells. er documents against the Polish Soon afzer Christmas, 194  clergy and to prepare "proofs" of electrifying news ran through alleged anti-state activities on the town and barios (villages). part of the priests. American ships were entering For the past few weeks officials Lingven Gulf, where the Japa of the secret police have been vis- nose had entered four years be- tting pastors and priests attached fore. Soon the liberating forces to schools in Silesia and demand- would land! ing that they sign "confessions," But first came the preliminar concerning the text of the Hier- shelling by the fleet. Actually, archy's Pastoral Letter. only eleven Japanese remained in Among the questions put to the the town. The main forces had priests b3f the. operatives, are the withdrawn. But erroneous infor- following: Is religion persecuted motion had apparently been given in Poland? Do the communists hinder the faithful in their relig- ious practices? Do they force the people to belong to the Commun- ist Party Do they remove relig- ion from the schools? There have already been in- stances of arrests of priests for answers which were not friendly to. th e communists. | N S U R e D S A V l N G $ Church Losing Ground in Scotland--Waning Irish H'O' M l [ Immigration Blame L 0 A N S Scotland today has about 625,000 Catholics and 900 priests among a population of about 5,000,000 but the church is losing ground because of the dammJng of the flow of Irish immigrants, Brother Clare, headmaster Ct St. Mungo Acad- emy, of the Passionist Fathers, told a Glasgow meeting. Fifty years after Ireland's fam- ine Scotland's Catholic population numbered 370,000 with 350 priests, but immigration waned at the be- ginn'ng of this century and has since stopped altogether. always feasible, social justice de- mands that reforms be introduced without delay which will guaran- tee every adult working man just such a wage. In this connection We might utter a word of praise for various systems, devised and attempted in practice, by which an increased wage is paid in view of increased family burdens, and a special provision is n-ado for .a special need." Canadian System A survey has disclosed that 39 nations now hay4: a family allow- ance plan in effect. Under the Canadian system, families with a yearly income of $3,600 or less a year are eligible for benefits. The first child of such a family re- ceives a $5-per-month allowance, while a family with two children receives a $7.50-per-month allow- ance.i Each addition to the family means an extra allowance. U, S, SUPREME COURT CONSIDERS ATHEIST'S APPEAL (Continued from Page 1) Stgtes Supreme Court, is as follows: That all materials and books, as well as incidental expenses, in con- nection with *.he program, are pro- vided by the various religious groups participating in the pro- gram; that children are admitted to religious instruction classes only upon the express written re- quest of parents and then only to classes designated by the parents; that classes are conducted in the grades for 30 minutes each week and in the Junior High School for 45 minutes each week; that com- petent teachers are provided by the participating religious groups; that school rooms, not required for school purposes, are made available because of the traffic hazards involved in transferring children to other available build- ings remote from the schools; and that classes are scheduled so as not to interfere in any way with the regular public school classes. Intervenors The Synagogue Council of Amer- ica, through its attorney, filed a brief deploring Mrs. McCollum's use of the case to advance her point of view but arguing that re, ligious teaching should not be given in public schools. Other groups filing briefs opposing the hampaign plan were a committee uf the Southern, Northern and Na- tional Baptist Conventions, the Seventh D a y Adventists, the American Unitarian Association, and the American Civil Liberties Union. The Protestant Council of New York came into the case to defend the released time plan as estab- lished in Champaign. Another brief supporting the school board was filed by the attorney general of Illinois. Justice Frank Murphy, who is sick, did not sit at the hearing. Justice William 0. Douglas left the bench soon after the argument Cosco Step Stool For Throughout-the-Years Convenience Give her this deluxe model for a gift of pretty usefulness! Chrome legs, padded seat, back. 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American as well as Filipino, I feel that Lingayan cathedral I represents a multiple claim that ' Fortitude is what helps some by now should be covered by i people to go through life hearing more than tropical weeds. I the trials of others. ME. 3613