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December 12, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947
 

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Friday, December 12, 1947 CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Page :Five e Irish Airlines Link Dublin-Rome; Pope 00;eoe BY 2 tsFirst Flight .UBLIN, Dec. 10.--The inaugu- aJ ration of a direct weekly air service between Dublin and Rome by the Irish airline system, "Aer i -Lingus," has been hailed through- Out Ireland as an event of deep spiritual significance, in addition to being an important step for- ward in the development of the -country's rapidly expanding air services. ........ This spiritual significance, aris- "ing from the age-old links between Ireland and the Eternal City, dat- " iiig back to the days of St. Pat- rick, found striking expression in the words which His Holiness Pope Plus XII directed to a party of Irish leaders and newspaper-  iien who took part in the opening flight and were received by the ]Holy Father at Castelgandolfo. "The Irish have long been found in all the known continents of the -. world; why should they not also find a place in the air?" the Pope said, speaking in English. "We know full well, and all true Irishmen know, that Ire- land needed no air line to link her to Rome. Since that bond .... was forged in the chivalrous soul of the Irish people by Ute heroic Apostle, St. Patrick, it has never once been broken, never once wealened under the heavy persistent hammer of God's enemies. "That link was, indeed, and re- mains today, a treasure to arouse and provoke the wrath of the powers of evil who hate or dis- believe in God and go about the world seeking the ruin Of souls so dear to Him. That link is the gloxving faith of the Irish in the all-blessed Trinity . . . '%Vith lives permeated by " such indomitable faith and moulded by its practice, is it any wonder that the Irish na- tion must always be true lovers of true liberty, intolerant of the tjTant, defenders of the God- given right of the individual, pure in family life, with a lleart for the poor an_d afflicted, patient, peaceful, loyal and l)rave." Among the 29 passengers aboard the first plane, a Constellation named St. Enda, were Msgr. Gino Paro, auditor of the Apostol/c Nunciature in Dubl'.m, Scan Le- . mass, minister for industry and commerce, and Babuscio Rizzo, Italian minister to Ireland. The plane received an official welcome on its arrival at Ciampino airport, near Rome. Joseph P. Walshe, Irish Abassador to the Holy See, _ accompanied the Irish party on their audience with the Pope. Under the present schedule, the plane on the Dublin-Rome route will leave Collinstown airport, out- ide Dublin, each Wednesday, re- turning on the following day. ART: Theoretically, the ardent' "and gilded expression in song, music, painting and sculpture of a 'people's philosophy of life. As ex- pounded, the discordant aesthetic reactions of the maladjusted. JOINED PROTESTS ON IRISH PARTITION I Two Ulster Protestants took a leading part in the recent meet- ing in New .York City called to protest the continued forced par- tition of Ireland, it was related by E. J. Coen, Tuesday, following his return from the New York meeting. Mr. Coen, delegate of Irish or- ganizations here, said 1,300 dele- gates present at the meeting Nov. 22 to 29, assembled from 39 states. "These delegates conferred on what action they might take to end the insult and injustice of the 9artition of Ireland by England under the pretext of protecting! Protestant minorities and British loyalists," said Mr. Coem "Partition itself seemed to be considered as the lesser evil, be- cause American Irish feel outrag- ed by having their kin in Ireland represented as dangerous religious bigots. Both fais accusations were challenged by Captain Ireland, an Ulster Protestant, Patrick Max- well an M. G. for Ulster, Dr, Lodge Curran of the American Catholic Truth Society and Rev. A. Hamil- ton Nesbit, a New York Protest- ant minister. The great meeting was occa- sioned by the presence of the two Ulster delegates who came over to tell Aaericans the outrageous dis- abilities under which the people of N. E. Ireland are living--a mili- tary dictatorship with unlimited power from the British Parliament. Their story revealed a condition little less than that in operation in communistic dominated Europe. "The response to the plea of the Ulster delegates was summed up fairly well by Mayor O'Dwyer this way: "But the_re is a corner of that island where the sun of freedom toes not shine because something far from Godly is standing in the way and creating a shadow. You are here to make a firm decision that that shadow must be remov- ed." "Twenty strong-willed men, un- der the leadership of Judge Scott of Los ngeles, were deputized to take the will of the meeting to President Truman and Congress, who will at least be asked to de- duct the amount of American dol- lars to England from her bill of upkeep of her army of occupation in Ireland." GERMAN CATHOLIC YOUTHS SALVAGE 100,000 BRICKS COLOGNE.  Nearly 100,000 bricks were cleaned and salvaged during the past six weeks from the rubble of the city of Hagen West- phalia, by boys and girls who are members of Catholic youth groups in that war-ravaged city. The bricks were made available to the municipality to rebuild de- stroyed homes. Have You Heard THE DRY WOOD, Caryll Houselande['s new novel is the superb Christmas gift! Order it today at-- THE GUILD BOOK SHOP "THE CATHOLIC BOOK STORE" 1328 6th Ave. SE. 2514 Seattle I, Wash. ST. FRANCIS BEAUTY SHOPPE 513 15th Avenue North PERMANENT WAVING OUR SPECIALTY Telephone PRospect 4200 The Imperial Quality Laundry I East Columbia at 18th Avenue CApitol 1200 s=00e =, EAst 28O0 Greek Rite Holy Names Academy Carolers Bishop Slain Prepare to Brighten Christmas By Red_Trool The two, priests and the semi- naxians were instantly killed; Bishop Romzlla received fatal injuries. A few minutes later, the re- ports received by Bishop Ivan- cho state, a military car drove up to the scene of the "acci- dent," the soldier occupants jumped out, finding Bishop Romzlm still breathing, shot him through the head. The five vic- tims were buried in Uzhorod on November 4. f The mountainous area compris- ing the territory of the Diocese of Mukacevo was formpxly part of Czechoslovakia and was ceded to the Soviet Union in 1945. Since that time there has been increas- ing pressure to force the faithful of the Byzantine-Slavonik Rite into severing their centuries-old bonds with the Holy See and af- filiate with the Moscow Patriarch- ate of the Russian Orthodox Church. Many priests and faithful were arrested and Bishop Remzha was the last Eastern Rite Catholic Bishop who still had a mcasmre of liberty. As part of the campaign to pro- mote schismamong Eastern Rite Catholics, their parishes are forced to pay a monthly tax of $750, Bishop Ivancho explained. Church- es of parishes unable to pay--and only a few are able to raise such a huge sum--are closed and, in many instances, handed over to Russian Orthodox communities who enjoy official protection. As a result, priests and people gather secretly in the forests to attend the celebration of Mass. Nominally, there is "freedom of religion" and the young people are not explicitly forbidden to attend church services, Bishop Ivancho said. But, on toe other hand, they are obliged to attend officihl com- munist youth meetings, which are invariably scheduled on Sundays and holydays, lasting from dawn to late in the evening. PRIEST RESCUES 108-YEAR-0LD FROM BURNING H 0 M E t LOTSVILLE, Ky., Dec. 9 (NC)--While a devastating fie i raged in a next-door warehouse, a Catholic priest groped his way through a smoke-filled home, I reached.the side of a 108-year-old I Negro woman just as she collaps- led, and carried her io safety. / The hero is the Rev. Robert A. Willett, pastor of St. , John Church and Catholic chaplain of the Louisville Fire Department, who is leloved as "Father Bob" by the firemen and his parishioners. He reached the scene of the fire which was sweeping the ware- house and was assured no one was in the burning building. He started to leave when he heard a woman's screams coming from the house next door. The priest broke down the front door and although blinded by smoke, he made his way to the woman's side through the sound of her voice. PROSPECTS FOR OBERAMMERGAU PLAY . IN 1950 DECLARED GOOD MUNICH, Germany.--Prospects are good that a suitable cast can be selected for the Oberammergau Passion Play, now scheduled for 1950, Heinrich Zunterer, mayor of the village, told this correspond- ent. Two main problems remain to be solved before successful, per- formances of the Passion Play can be envisaged. A number of poten- tial members of the cast still are prisoners of war; but there is reasonable hope that those held by the British and French will be released in time. Gift rosaries, Missals, prayer- books, etc. at The Kaufer Com- pany, Catholic Supply House, 904 Fourth Ave., Seattle. PADDEN & MORIARTY Attorneys for Estate 1212 American Building Seattle, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE - STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY" OF KING. IN THE MATTER OP THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE A. PEET, Deceased. IN PROBATE--No. 104590. " ,NOTICE TO CREDITORS Notice is hereby given that the un2 dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as executors and executrix of the estate of Catherine A. Peer, De- Rehearsing the joyful carols'of Christmas are these members of the Holy Names Academy Cecilians: front (left to right): Jeanne Baylor, Margaret Crrigan and Joyce Chadwell; in background, Mary Ellen Jensen, Patricla Schaar, Dolores Valentine and Katherine Sullivan. The Holy Names * Cecilians will sing at the Academy Christmas Assembly, Friday, Dec. 19, and, "during the holidays, for the Serl J Club, the Catholic Seamans' Club andfor other organizations. I I 22,917 Cans of Food And $10,981 Collected In Relief Food Drive EPORTS, still incomplete, on the Thanksgiving Food Drive bring total collections to 22,917 cans of food and $10,981.35 in cur- rency, according to the Rev. Em- ery J. Blanchard, director of the campaign for the Diocese of Seattle. Collections totalling 18,801 cans of food and $6,207.68 were re- ported this week from the follow- ing parishes: Seattle: The Immaculate, $586.05; St. Alphonsus, $234.25; St. Benedict, 1100 cans, $179; St. Ed- ward, 1050 cans, $40; St. Mary, 400 cans, $154.99; St. Patrick, 507 cans, $166.25; Sacred Heart 300 cans, $264.10; St. argaret, ! $145.80. Tacoma: Visitation $473; St. Leo, $350; Sacred Heart, $119.05. Other pa.rishes in the Diocese: S. S. Aegidias and Mary, Aber- deen, 1180 cans, $20.81; St. Mary, Anacortes and Missions, 600 cans $38.62; Immaculate Conception, Arlington, 900 cans, $22.50; Sacred Heart, Battle Ground and Mis- sions, 800 cans; Assumption, Bel- lingham, 850 cans, $166.70; Sacred Heart, Bellingham $99.16; Star of the Sea, Bremerton, 200 cans $610; Sacred Heart, Bellevue, $60.25; St. Barbara, Black Dia- mond, $132.75;. St. Brendan Bothell $27.11. St. Francis, Cowlitz, 168 cans St. Patrick, Dockton, 578 cans; St. Philomathea, Des Moines, $90; Holy Innocents, Duvall, 48 cans, $2; St. Andrew, Ellensburg, 2100 cans; St. Joseph, Elma, $92.25; Sacred Heart, Enumclaw, $133.65; Immaculate Conception, Everett, $500; St. Joseph, Ferndale, 450 cans, $25.50; St. Nicholas, Gig Harbor, $78.50; Our Lady of Good Help, Hoquiam, 200 cans, $15; Sacred Heart, Lacey, 480 cans, $17; Sacred Heart, La Conner, $5; Holy FamilY, Kirkland, $134.80. St. Mary, Monroe, 700 cans, $10.30; St. Margaret Mary, Mc- Kenna, $18; St. John, Mukilteo, $24; St. John of the Woods, Mid- land and Missions, $78.26;Northern Mission, Winiock, 400 cans; St." Michael, Olympia, 750 cans, $80.50; St. Joseph Pe Ell and Mission, 200 cans, $17; Queen of Angels,' Port Angeles, 450 cans, $20; St. Anthony, Renton, 580 cans, $190.50; St. Michael, Snohomish, 250 cans; St. Francis, Seahurst, $68; Holy Cross, Skykomish, 250 cans, $5. Immaculate Heart, Sedro Wool- ley, $17; St. Andrew, Sumner, 50 cans, $84.30; St. Aloysius, Top- penish, 660 cans; St. Peter, Su- quamish, $80.33; Our Lady of Loudres, Wilkeson, $19; St. Peter, Wapato, $501.40; St. James, Van- couver, 3030 cans; St. Joseph Hos- pital, Vancouver, $10; Assumption [School, Bellingham, 570 cans. Modern Music, Art Can Be Fitting in Worship, Says New Encyclical on L,turgy (Continued from Page I) the Eucharistic Sacrifice, do not by that fact enjoy priestly pow- ers . . . Yet, it must be affirmed that the laity, too, offers the Di- vine Victim in a certain sense . . . Nor is it surprising that the laity are raised to this dignity. For by the waters of Baptism and the title of Christian they become members of the Mystical Body of Christ, the Priest, and by virtue of the character which is imprinted on their souls they are privileged to assist at the divine worship and according to their status par- ticipate in the priesthood of Christ. Place For Modern Music "As regards music, certain clear normg on the liturgy laid down by the Holy See must be re- ligiously observed. Gregorian chant --which the Roman Church con- siders as its very own because it was received from great antiquity; and was preserved throughout the centuries under its loving care, which it gives to the faithful as something of their own and which has been definitely prescribed in certain parts of the Liturgy--not ceased; that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby re- qulxed ton serve the same, duly veri-[only adds decorum and solemnity tied on said Padden & Moriarty their  ._ .-,_ .... . ........ ' " ' to LIle ccieoraL10n oI Erie G1vJne attorneys of record at the address be-/ low stated, and file the same with mysteries but chiefly contributes the Clerk of said Court. together with   . ' ......... proof of such service within six/tO an increase o Ialm ann piety months after the date of first publi-| in the people. cation of this notice, or tle same will | "However i t cannot be -ffi,ned I be barred. * - '  " = " Date of first publication December 12tb, 1947. ROBERT S. PEET ROY WILLIAM PEET VERA PEET BOP, ST Executors and Executrix of said Estate. 212 Amocan Building, i I Seattle, Wash. I j PADDEN & MUILt " I I Attorneys for Estate, i 11212 American ullding, not spring from a vain desire for [ Seattle, Wash. ]1_ " L,.L -1 t r*e. *4_f" PU'lcati.an Dec. 2a. the novel and unusual, then it is  _ -. : : - . =.. :-  .... certainly nece_ary :to: open to them the doors of our churches, as they can contribute in no small measure to the splendor of the sacred rites, to the elevation of the minds as well as to true de- votion. On Modern Art "What we have said about music can practically be said of the other arts, particularly of ar- chitecture, sculpture and painting. One cannot generally spurn and reject because of prejudice recent forms and style which are better adapted to the new material out of which they are fashioned. On the contrary, if one avoids with wise balance excessive realism on the one hand and exaggerated sym- bolism on the other, and takes into consideration the needs of the Christian community rather than the personal opinion and taste of artists, it is altogether proper to give a free hand to that modern art which, with due reverence and honor, serves the sacred places and sacred rites. "Thus it becomes possible for modern art, too, to join its voice to the admirable canticle of glory which the masters raised in past centuries to the glory of the Cath- olic faiLh. "U e cannot refrain, however, as a dotv of conscience, from deplor- ing and reproving those forms and styles, recently introduced by same, which appear to be deprava- that modern music and chant must I tions and distortions of true art, be entirely excluded from Cath-land which sometimes are openly olic worship. n fact. if these have i repugnant to Christian decorum, ! nothing which smacks of the pro- i modesty and piety, and sadly of- lane and is unbecoming to thc!fend genuine religious sentiment; sanctity of the place or to the!these must absolutely be avoided sacred function and if these dgland be put out of our churches !ike 'generally, all that is not in harmony with the sanctity of the place;' " D,C,C,W, BOARD I ST, F, X, CABRINI" MAKES PLANS FOR STATUE PLACE ANNUAL CONVENTIONI IN SAINT PETER'S SELECTIONS NOW OF Saturday at the Roosevelt Hotel, Seattle. The convention will be the first since the outbreak of !World War II, the annual meet- ings have been suspended and deanery conferences substituted. Complete plans for the conven- tion will be outlined in the near future, declared Mrs. Richard C Schank, Seattle, president of D. C. C. W., who will act as gen- eral chairman with Mrs. J. Rulon Compton, president of the Central Deanery, and Mrs. B. J. Riverman, Seattle city chapter chairman, as assistants. City chapters of Aub- urn and Bremerton, both affiliates of Central Deanery, will be co- hostesses with theSeattle Chap- ter. Spiritual foundations 6f a united world will be the theme of the convention and program topics will be keyed to this theme. Election of a president and secretary will take place this year and there will also be revision of the constitu- tion and by-laws to meet chang- ing demands on the Council. [ The executive board heard re- I ports on Diocesan" activities and on D. C. C. W. development. The board passed a resolution urg- ing KOMO to return the Cath- olic Hour to 3 p.m. when it can more conveniently be heard by the majority of listeners. The board also urged that Catholic women of the Diocese write to KOMO asIong that the former time for the Catholic hour be resumed. The board protested the show- ing of the picture "Forever Am- ber" and urged members of af- filiations to make the disapproval of this picture known, to manager of both downtown and neighbor- hood theatres. Exhibit was made of a certifi- cate of award to the Seattle City Chapter, D. C. C. W., in recogni- tion of distinguished war service in cooperation with U. S. O. :Many of the women of D. C. C. W. re- ceived pins, among the group the president, Mrs. Schank, who gave 3500 hours of service. A letter from the National Catholic Community Service was I read citing St. James Parish president, ,Mrs. Schank, who gave unit of Vancouver, 'ash., for ex- ceptional cooperation with work done at U. S. O. and in con- nection with Barnes Hospital. Paris, N. Y., Tokyo Is .Just Another Trip For Nun, 75 tOKYO, Dec. 10.- (NC) --"Life begins at 75" might well be said of Mother Ste. Radegonde, su- perior general o; the Helpers Of the Holy Souls, who recently vis- ited the missions of her commu- nity here while enroute to China. ,Paris to Tokyo via New York is a long jaunt for a person at any age, but for the septuagenarian Mother Radegonde it's Just another trip, considering that she has been on the road for virtually two years visiting her Sisters in France, Bel- gium, Spain, the Netherlands, Switzeffland. Italy, England and the United States prior to taking off for the Orient. Mother Radegonde has seen ruins a-plenty during her visita- tion but her motto seems to be "BUILD," in capital letters. The two houses of the community in Japan were totally destroyed dur- ing the war, one of them by the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, but though much reconstruction is needed there and in Yawata, Mother Radegonde was able to at- tend the formal opening of a third and new establishment in Tokyo on the Feast of Christ the King. She has her eyes on Mexico, too, and says a bit reminiscently: "A.h, the house in Mexico should be open by the middle of next month." i The Helpers of the Holy Souls arrived in Japan in 1935 and now have a total of 27 foreign and 10 Japanese Sisters here. Their spe- cialty is social work, much of which resembles that of the Saint Vincent de Paul Society with em- phasis on visits to the homes of the needy. swEENEY AND DILLON Attorney for Estate 917 ARCTIC BUILDING Seattle 4, Wash. IN THE suPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF KING IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF coRNELIUS WESSEL, Deceased. IN PROBATE--No. 104768. NOTICE TO CREDITORS. Notice is hereby given that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as Executrix of the estate of Cornelius Wessel. Deceased; that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Ex- i ecutrix or her attorney of record at the address below stated, and file the same with the Clerk of said Court, together with proof of such service within six months after the date of first publication, cr tbe same will be barred Date of first publication Dec. 12, 1947. EVA MMAHON, Executrix of said Estate. JOSEPH A. SWEENEY, Seattle, Wash. SWEENEY AND DILLON, Attorney for Estate, 917 Arctic Building Seattle 4, Wash. Date of f inal lublicatiQ, Dcm- bet 2. 1947. was solemnly unveiled and dedi- cated today in the Basilica of St. Peter. His Eminence Frederico Cardinal Tedeschin, Archpriest of the Basilica of St. Peter, presided at the rituals. Following the ceremonies, His Holiness Pope Plus XII received in audience a group of pilgrims from the United States, who had come here for the unveiling. Prom- inent rnong them were Msgr. Aristeo V. Simoni, who served as vice postulator of the cause of Mother Cabrini, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas LeRoy Warner, of Chicago, who donated the statue to the Basilica. Also at the cere- monies were several prelateg, many U. S. priests and some 300 runs of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, founded by Mother Cabrini. Prior to receiving the pilgrims, the Pope received 180 officers and men of the U. S. cruisers Ports- mouth and Providence. U. S. Ambassador to Italy James Clement Dunn along with a number of other members of the diplomatic corps attended the unveiling. ELGIN Watches NEW CARMELITE CON,VENT IN OSAKA IS SECOND FOUNDED IN JAPAN 0nly n ELGIN has the DURAPOWER The only mainsprino that / 11 r'unnitn;US oweH:ds1ots lVa:ttichg "{1 I] accuracy. Beautiful new /] modcls. "See them now. I  *Patent pendlng h GLEESON &oR0CK t If/ ARrretaeredeffe"s-lefeS;y _ I TOKYO, Dec. 9 (NC)--A new American Gem Society  Carmelite convent is being found- 1510 Westlake .&venue, Seattle ed in Osaka, one of Japan's largest cities. This Carmel, second in Ja- pan, is an offshoot from the first, founded in Tokyo only 14 years Still a great selection of Christ- ago. mas cards at The Kaufer Corn- In 1933 four Carmelite nuns came from their monastery in Cho- pany, Catholic Supply House, let, Saumur, France, to initiate 1904 Fourth Ave. at Stewart St., their contemplative life in Japan. Seattle. TOP TUNES OF THE DAY GET THEM AT .. 00,.so.s " Albums for Your._ ChrisCmas Giving  POPULAR FAVORIT !a'S A-SS0--Merry Chrlsfmas by Bing Crosby .................... $ 3.95 C-129--Carle Comes Calling .............................. 3.75 BD-27--Tex RiHer in Cowboy Favolfes (includes Rye Whiskey) 3.31 A-540-Jimmy Dorsey, Latln-Arnericn Favorites ............. 3.95 e CLASSICAL ALBUMS M-t077--Chrisfmes Hymns end Carols--Victor Chora| Group .... 5.49 : MOP-25-Verdi--La Travlafa (complete recording, soloists and or- chestra of the Opera House of Rome, conducted by Yin- cenzo Belleza. 30 sides ............................ 21.4S MX-251-Rhepsody n Blue--Oscar Lavant (Eugene Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia Orchedra] ............. 3.35 RECORD HASSOCgS--A beautiful pece of furniture made of ) Tolax leather. Keeps your records from waroing or breaking. Holds 100 records. Will fake kicking or scufflng.'lvory, b[ends wlt, any furniture ............................................. $23.95 ( ORDER EY MAIL ..... [] Enclose fiid $ ......... for above ...= numbers checked. [] Send me C.O.D. numbers checked. , Nm@...,.. ,..,., ,.......,. o..,..  Address ........................... C.y ............ Sere .............. 1329 3rd Ave. SE. 1357 OLYMPIC HOTEL 5th AVEHUE at University COLLEGE SHOP MElrose 8891 4500 University Way SEAIILE "In Every Direction We Serve the Best" N --E S BURNER 01LS WOOD COAL SEATTLE TACOMA PORTLAN D Main 5080 Main l 1/?, l;l,(hvy 5657 Friday, December 12, 1947 CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS Page :Five e Irish Airlines Link Dublin-Rome; Pope 00;eoe BY 2 tsFirst Flight .UBLIN, Dec. 10.--The inaugu- aJ ration of a direct weekly air service between Dublin and Rome by the Irish airline system, "Aer i -Lingus," has been hailed through- Out Ireland as an event of deep spiritual significance, in addition to being an important step for- ward in the development of the -country's rapidly expanding air services. ........ This spiritual significance, aris- "ing from the age-old links between Ireland and the Eternal City, dat- " iiig back to the days of St. Pat- rick, found striking expression in the words which His Holiness Pope Plus XII directed to a party of Irish leaders and newspaper-  iien who took part in the opening flight and were received by the ]Holy Father at Castelgandolfo. "The Irish have long been found in all the known continents of the -. world; why should they not also find a place in the air?" the Pope said, speaking in English. "We know full well, and all true Irishmen know, that Ire- land needed no air line to link her to Rome. Since that bond .... was forged in the chivalrous soul of the Irish people by Ute heroic Apostle, St. Patrick, it has never once been broken, never once wealened under the heavy persistent hammer of God's enemies. "That link was, indeed, and re- mains today, a treasure to arouse and provoke the wrath of the powers of evil who hate or dis- believe in God and go about the world seeking the ruin Of souls so dear to Him. That link is the gloxving faith of the Irish in the all-blessed Trinity . . . '%Vith lives permeated by " such indomitable faith and moulded by its practice, is it any wonder that the Irish na- tion must always be true lovers of true liberty, intolerant of the tjTant, defenders of the God- given right of the individual, pure in family life, with a lleart for the poor an_d afflicted, patient, peaceful, loyal and l)rave." Among the 29 passengers aboard the first plane, a Constellation named St. Enda, were Msgr. Gino Paro, auditor of the Apostol/c Nunciature in Dubl'.m, Scan Le- . mass, minister for industry and commerce, and Babuscio Rizzo, Italian minister to Ireland. The plane received an official welcome on its arrival at Ciampino airport, near Rome. Joseph P. Walshe, Irish Abassador to the Holy See, _ accompanied the Irish party on their audience with the Pope. Under the present schedule, the plane on the Dublin-Rome route will leave Collinstown airport, out- ide Dublin, each Wednesday, re- turning on the following day. ART: Theoretically, the ardent' "and gilded expression in song, music, painting and sculpture of a 'people's philosophy of life. As ex- pounded, the discordant aesthetic reactions of the maladjusted. JOINED PROTESTS ON IRISH PARTITION I Two Ulster Protestants took a leading part in the recent meet- ing in New .York City called to protest the continued forced par- tition of Ireland, it was related by E. J. Coen, Tuesday, following his return from the New York meeting. Mr. Coen, delegate of Irish or- ganizations here, said 1,300 dele- gates present at the meeting Nov. 22 to 29, assembled from 39 states. "These delegates conferred on what action they might take to end the insult and injustice of the 9artition of Ireland by England under the pretext of protecting! Protestant minorities and British loyalists," said Mr. Coem "Partition itself seemed to be considered as the lesser evil, be- cause American Irish feel outrag- ed by having their kin in Ireland represented as dangerous religious bigots. Both fais accusations were challenged by Captain Ireland, an Ulster Protestant, Patrick Max- well an M. G. for Ulster, Dr, Lodge Curran of the American Catholic Truth Society and Rev. A. Hamil- ton Nesbit, a New York Protest- ant minister. The great meeting was occa- sioned by the presence of the two Ulster delegates who came over to tell Aaericans the outrageous dis- abilities under which the people of N. E. Ireland are living--a mili- tary dictatorship with unlimited power from the British Parliament. Their story revealed a condition little less than that in operation in communistic dominated Europe. "The response to the plea of the Ulster delegates was summed up fairly well by Mayor O'Dwyer this way: "But the_re is a corner of that island where the sun of freedom toes not shine because something far from Godly is standing in the way and creating a shadow. You are here to make a firm decision that that shadow must be remov- ed." "Twenty strong-willed men, un- der the leadership of Judge Scott of Los ngeles, were deputized to take the will of the meeting to President Truman and Congress, who will at least be asked to de- duct the amount of American dol- lars to England from her bill of upkeep of her army of occupation in Ireland." GERMAN CATHOLIC YOUTHS SALVAGE 100,000 BRICKS COLOGNE.  Nearly 100,000 bricks were cleaned and salvaged during the past six weeks from the rubble of the city of Hagen West- phalia, by boys and girls who are members of Catholic youth groups in that war-ravaged city. The bricks were made available to the municipality to rebuild de- stroyed homes. Have You Heard THE DRY WOOD, Caryll Houselande['s new novel is the superb Christmas gift! Order it today at-- THE GUILD BOOK SHOP "THE CATHOLIC BOOK STORE" 1328 6th Ave. SE. 2514 Seattle I, Wash. ST. FRANCIS BEAUTY SHOPPE 513 15th Avenue North PERMANENT WAVING OUR SPECIALTY Telephone PRospect 4200 The Imperial Quality Laundry I East Columbia at 18th Avenue CApitol 1200 s=00e =, EAst 28O0 Greek Rite Holy Names Academy Carolers Bishop Slain Prepare to Brighten Christmas By Red_Trool The two, priests and the semi- naxians were instantly killed; Bishop Romzlla received fatal injuries. A few minutes later, the re- ports received by Bishop Ivan- cho state, a military car drove up to the scene of the "acci- dent," the soldier occupants jumped out, finding Bishop Romzlm still breathing, shot him through the head. The five vic- tims were buried in Uzhorod on November 4. f The mountainous area compris- ing the territory of the Diocese of Mukacevo was formpxly part of Czechoslovakia and was ceded to the Soviet Union in 1945. Since that time there has been increas- ing pressure to force the faithful of the Byzantine-Slavonik Rite into severing their centuries-old bonds with the Holy See and af- filiate with the Moscow Patriarch- ate of the Russian Orthodox Church. Many priests and faithful were arrested and Bishop Remzha was the last Eastern Rite Catholic Bishop who still had a mcasmre of liberty. As part of the campaign to pro- mote schismamong Eastern Rite Catholics, their parishes are forced to pay a monthly tax of $750, Bishop Ivancho explained. Church- es of parishes unable to pay--and only a few are able to raise such a huge sum--are closed and, in many instances, handed over to Russian Orthodox communities who enjoy official protection. As a result, priests and people gather secretly in the forests to attend the celebration of Mass. Nominally, there is "freedom of religion" and the young people are not explicitly forbidden to attend church services, Bishop Ivancho said. But, on toe other hand, they are obliged to attend officihl com- munist youth meetings, which are invariably scheduled on Sundays and holydays, lasting from dawn to late in the evening. PRIEST RESCUES 108-YEAR-0LD FROM BURNING H 0 M E t LOTSVILLE, Ky., Dec. 9 (NC)--While a devastating fie i raged in a next-door warehouse, a Catholic priest groped his way through a smoke-filled home, I reached.the side of a 108-year-old I Negro woman just as she collaps- led, and carried her io safety. / The hero is the Rev. Robert A. Willett, pastor of St. , John Church and Catholic chaplain of the Louisville Fire Department, who is leloved as "Father Bob" by the firemen and his parishioners. He reached the scene of the fire which was sweeping the ware- house and was assured no one was in the burning building. He started to leave when he heard a woman's screams coming from the house next door. The priest broke down the front door and although blinded by smoke, he made his way to the woman's side through the sound of her voice. PROSPECTS FOR OBERAMMERGAU PLAY . IN 1950 DECLARED GOOD MUNICH, Germany.--Prospects are good that a suitable cast can be selected for the Oberammergau Passion Play, now scheduled for 1950, Heinrich Zunterer, mayor of the village, told this correspond- ent. Two main problems remain to be solved before successful, per- formances of the Passion Play can be envisaged. A number of poten- tial members of the cast still are prisoners of war; but there is reasonable hope that those held by the British and French will be released in time. Gift rosaries, Missals, prayer- books, etc. at The Kaufer Com- pany, Catholic Supply House, 904 Fourth Ave., Seattle. PADDEN & MORIARTY Attorneys for Estate 1212 American Building Seattle, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE - STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY" OF KING. IN THE MATTER OP THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE A. PEET, Deceased. IN PROBATE--No. 104590. " ,NOTICE TO CREDITORS Notice is hereby given that the un2 dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as executors and executrix of the estate of Catherine A. Peer, De- Rehearsing the joyful carols'of Christmas are these members of the Holy Names Academy Cecilians: front (left to right): Jeanne Baylor, Margaret Crrigan and Joyce Chadwell; in background, Mary Ellen Jensen, Patricla Schaar, Dolores Valentine and Katherine Sullivan. The Holy Names * Cecilians will sing at the Academy Christmas Assembly, Friday, Dec. 19, and, "during the holidays, for the Serl J Club, the Catholic Seamans' Club andfor other organizations. I I 22,917 Cans of Food And $10,981 Collected In Relief Food Drive EPORTS, still incomplete, on the Thanksgiving Food Drive bring total collections to 22,917 cans of food and $10,981.35 in cur- rency, according to the Rev. Em- ery J. Blanchard, director of the campaign for the Diocese of Seattle. Collections totalling 18,801 cans of food and $6,207.68 were re- ported this week from the follow- ing parishes: Seattle: The Immaculate, $586.05; St. Alphonsus, $234.25; St. Benedict, 1100 cans, $179; St. Ed- ward, 1050 cans, $40; St. Mary, 400 cans, $154.99; St. Patrick, 507 cans, $166.25; Sacred Heart 300 cans, $264.10; St. argaret, ! $145.80. Tacoma: Visitation $473; St. Leo, $350; Sacred Heart, $119.05. Other pa.rishes in the Diocese: S. S. Aegidias and Mary, Aber- deen, 1180 cans, $20.81; St. Mary, Anacortes and Missions, 600 cans $38.62; Immaculate Conception, Arlington, 900 cans, $22.50; Sacred Heart, Battle Ground and Mis- sions, 800 cans; Assumption, Bel- lingham, 850 cans, $166.70; Sacred Heart, Bellingham $99.16; Star of the Sea, Bremerton, 200 cans $610; Sacred Heart, Bellevue, $60.25; St. Barbara, Black Dia- mond, $132.75;. St. Brendan Bothell $27.11. St. Francis, Cowlitz, 168 cans St. Patrick, Dockton, 578 cans; St. Philomathea, Des Moines, $90; Holy Innocents, Duvall, 48 cans, $2; St. Andrew, Ellensburg, 2100 cans; St. Joseph, Elma, $92.25; Sacred Heart, Enumclaw, $133.65; Immaculate Conception, Everett, $500; St. Joseph, Ferndale, 450 cans, $25.50; St. Nicholas, Gig Harbor, $78.50; Our Lady of Good Help, Hoquiam, 200 cans, $15; Sacred Heart, Lacey, 480 cans, $17; Sacred Heart, La Conner, $5; Holy FamilY, Kirkland, $134.80. St. Mary, Monroe, 700 cans, $10.30; St. Margaret Mary, Mc- Kenna, $18; St. John, Mukilteo, $24; St. John of the Woods, Mid- land and Missions, $78.26;Northern Mission, Winiock, 400 cans; St." Michael, Olympia, 750 cans, $80.50; St. Joseph Pe Ell and Mission, 200 cans, $17; Queen of Angels,' Port Angeles, 450 cans, $20; St. Anthony, Renton, 580 cans, $190.50; St. Michael, Snohomish, 250 cans; St. Francis, Seahurst, $68; Holy Cross, Skykomish, 250 cans, $5. Immaculate Heart, Sedro Wool- ley, $17; St. Andrew, Sumner, 50 cans, $84.30; St. Aloysius, Top- penish, 660 cans; St. Peter, Su- quamish, $80.33; Our Lady of Loudres, Wilkeson, $19; St. Peter, Wapato, $501.40; St. James, Van- couver, 3030 cans; St. Joseph Hos- pital, Vancouver, $10; Assumption [School, Bellingham, 570 cans. Modern Music, Art Can Be Fitting in Worship, Says New Encyclical on L,turgy (Continued from Page I) the Eucharistic Sacrifice, do not by that fact enjoy priestly pow- ers . . . Yet, it must be affirmed that the laity, too, offers the Di- vine Victim in a certain sense . . . Nor is it surprising that the laity are raised to this dignity. For by the waters of Baptism and the title of Christian they become members of the Mystical Body of Christ, the Priest, and by virtue of the character which is imprinted on their souls they are privileged to assist at the divine worship and according to their status par- ticipate in the priesthood of Christ. Place For Modern Music "As regards music, certain clear normg on the liturgy laid down by the Holy See must be re- ligiously observed. Gregorian chant --which the Roman Church con- siders as its very own because it was received from great antiquity; and was preserved throughout the centuries under its loving care, which it gives to the faithful as something of their own and which has been definitely prescribed in certain parts of the Liturgy--not ceased; that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby re- qulxed ton serve the same, duly veri-[only adds decorum and solemnity tied on said Padden & Moriarty their  ._ .-,_ .... . ........ ' " ' to LIle ccieoraL10n oI Erie G1vJne attorneys of record at the address be-/ low stated, and file the same with mysteries but chiefly contributes the Clerk of said Court. together with   . ' ......... proof of such service within six/tO an increase o Ialm ann piety months after the date of first publi-| in the people. cation of this notice, or tle same will | "However i t cannot be -ffi,ned I be barred. * - '  " = " Date of first publication December 12tb, 1947. ROBERT S. PEET ROY WILLIAM PEET VERA PEET BOP, ST Executors and Executrix of said Estate. 212 Amocan Building, i I Seattle, Wash. I j PADDEN & MUILt " I I Attorneys for Estate, i 11212 American ullding, not spring from a vain desire for [ Seattle, Wash. ]1_ " L,.L -1 t r*e. *4_f" PU'lcati.an Dec. 2a. the novel and unusual, then it is  _ -. : : - . =.. :-  .... certainly nece_ary :to: open to them the doors of our churches, as they can contribute in no small measure to the splendor of the sacred rites, to the elevation of the minds as well as to true de- votion. On Modern Art "What we have said about music can practically be said of the other arts, particularly of ar- chitecture, sculpture and painting. One cannot generally spurn and reject because of prejudice recent forms and style which are better adapted to the new material out of which they are fashioned. On the contrary, if one avoids with wise balance excessive realism on the one hand and exaggerated sym- bolism on the other, and takes into consideration the needs of the Christian community rather than the personal opinion and taste of artists, it is altogether proper to give a free hand to that modern art which, with due reverence and honor, serves the sacred places and sacred rites. "Thus it becomes possible for modern art, too, to join its voice to the admirable canticle of glory which the masters raised in past centuries to the glory of the Cath- olic faiLh. "U e cannot refrain, however, as a dotv of conscience, from deplor- ing and reproving those forms and styles, recently introduced by same, which appear to be deprava- that modern music and chant must I tions and distortions of true art, be entirely excluded from Cath-land which sometimes are openly olic worship. n fact. if these have i repugnant to Christian decorum, ! nothing which smacks of the pro- i modesty and piety, and sadly of- lane and is unbecoming to thc!fend genuine religious sentiment; sanctity of the place or to the!these must absolutely be avoided sacred function and if these dgland be put out of our churches !ike 'generally, all that is not in harmony with the sanctity of the place;' " D,C,C,W, BOARD I ST, F, X, CABRINI" MAKES PLANS FOR STATUE PLACE ANNUAL CONVENTIONI IN SAINT PETER'S SELECTIONS NOW OF Saturday at the Roosevelt Hotel, Seattle. The convention will be the first since the outbreak of !World War II, the annual meet- ings have been suspended and deanery conferences substituted. Complete plans for the conven- tion will be outlined in the near future, declared Mrs. Richard C Schank, Seattle, president of D. C. C. W., who will act as gen- eral chairman with Mrs. J. Rulon Compton, president of the Central Deanery, and Mrs. B. J. Riverman, Seattle city chapter chairman, as assistants. City chapters of Aub- urn and Bremerton, both affiliates of Central Deanery, will be co- hostesses with theSeattle Chap- ter. Spiritual foundations 6f a united world will be the theme of the convention and program topics will be keyed to this theme. Election of a president and secretary will take place this year and there will also be revision of the constitu- tion and by-laws to meet chang- ing demands on the Council. [ The executive board heard re- I ports on Diocesan" activities and on D. C. C. W. development. The board passed a resolution urg- ing KOMO to return the Cath- olic Hour to 3 p.m. when it can more conveniently be heard by the majority of listeners. The board also urged that Catholic women of the Diocese write to KOMO asIong that the former time for the Catholic hour be resumed. The board protested the show- ing of the picture "Forever Am- ber" and urged members of af- filiations to make the disapproval of this picture known, to manager of both downtown and neighbor- hood theatres. Exhibit was made of a certifi- cate of award to the Seattle City Chapter, D. C. C. W., in recogni- tion of distinguished war service in cooperation with U. S. O. :Many of the women of D. C. C. W. re- ceived pins, among the group the president, Mrs. Schank, who gave 3500 hours of service. A letter from the National Catholic Community Service was I read citing St. James Parish president, ,Mrs. Schank, who gave unit of Vancouver, 'ash., for ex- ceptional cooperation with work done at U. S. O. and in con- nection with Barnes Hospital. Paris, N. Y., Tokyo Is .Just Another Trip For Nun, 75 tOKYO, Dec. 10.- (NC) --"Life begins at 75" might well be said of Mother Ste. Radegonde, su- perior general o; the Helpers Of the Holy Souls, who recently vis- ited the missions of her commu- nity here while enroute to China. ,Paris to Tokyo via New York is a long jaunt for a person at any age, but for the septuagenarian Mother Radegonde it's Just another trip, considering that she has been on the road for virtually two years visiting her Sisters in France, Bel- gium, Spain, the Netherlands, Switzeffland. Italy, England and the United States prior to taking off for the Orient. Mother Radegonde has seen ruins a-plenty during her visita- tion but her motto seems to be "BUILD," in capital letters. The two houses of the community in Japan were totally destroyed dur- ing the war, one of them by the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, but though much reconstruction is needed there and in Yawata, Mother Radegonde was able to at- tend the formal opening of a third and new establishment in Tokyo on the Feast of Christ the King. She has her eyes on Mexico, too, and says a bit reminiscently: "A.h, the house in Mexico should be open by the middle of next month." i The Helpers of the Holy Souls arrived in Japan in 1935 and now have a total of 27 foreign and 10 Japanese Sisters here. Their spe- cialty is social work, much of which resembles that of the Saint Vincent de Paul Society with em- phasis on visits to the homes of the needy. swEENEY AND DILLON Attorney for Estate 917 ARCTIC BUILDING Seattle 4, Wash. IN THE suPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF KING IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF coRNELIUS WESSEL, Deceased. IN PROBATE--No. 104768. NOTICE TO CREDITORS. Notice is hereby given that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as Executrix of the estate of Cornelius Wessel. Deceased; that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Ex- i ecutrix or her attorney of record at the address below stated, and file the same with the Clerk of said Court, together with proof of such service within six months after the date of first publication, cr tbe same will be barred Date of first publication Dec. 12, 1947. EVA MMAHON, Executrix of said Estate. JOSEPH A. SWEENEY, Seattle, Wash. SWEENEY AND DILLON, Attorney for Estate, 917 Arctic Building Seattle 4, Wash. Date of final lublicatiQ, Dcm- bet 2. 1947. was solemnly unveiled and dedi- cated today in the Basilica of St. Peter. His Eminence Frederico Cardinal Tedeschin, Archpriest of the Basilica of St. Peter, presided at the rituals. Following the ceremonies, His Holiness Pope Plus XII received in audience a group of pilgrims from the United States, who had come here for the unveiling. Prom- inent rnong them were Msgr. Aristeo V. Simoni, who served as vice postulator of the cause of Mother Cabrini, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas LeRoy Warner, of Chicago, who donated the statue to the Basilica. Also at the cere- monies were several prelateg, many U. S. priests and some 300 runs of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, founded by Mother Cabrini. Prior to receiving the pilgrims, the Pope received 180 officers and men of the U. S. cruisers Ports- mouth and Providence. U. S. Ambassador to Italy James Clement Dunn along with a number of other members of the diplomatic corps attended the unveiling. ELGIN Watches NEW CARMELITE CON,VENT IN OSAKA IS SECOND FOUNDED IN JAPAN 0nly n ELGIN has the DURAPOWER The only mainsprino that / 11 r'unnitn;US oweH:ds1ots lVa:ttichg "{1 I] accuracy. Beautiful new /] modcls. "See them now. I  *Patent pendlng h GLEESON &oR0CK t If/ ARrretaeredeffe"s-lefeS;y _ I TOKYO, Dec. 9 (NC)--A new American Gem Society  Carmelite convent is being found- 1510 Westlake .&venue, Seattle ed in Osaka, one of Japan's largest cities. This Carmel, second in Ja- pan, is an offshoot from the first, founded in Tokyo only 14 years Still a great selection of Christ- ago. mas cards at The Kaufer Corn- In 1933 four Carmelite nuns came from their monastery in Cho- pany, Catholic Supply House, let, Saumur, France, to initiate 1904 Fourth Ave. at Stewart St., their contemplative life in Japan. Seattle. 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