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December 12, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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December 12, 1947
 

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907Terry Avenue, Seattle (4) tJnterecl as Seond-Class Matter.at the Postofflce at Seattle February 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 WILI.,IAM P. O'CONNELL - I--:. ANDREW PROUTY , Managing Edjtor Editor Published by the Northwest Progress Co. PreValent, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughney, S-M., S.TJ. . Bishop of Seattle The Catholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function ; as the o-ficial newspaper of our diocese. It is a necessary .... channel 0f information and instruction and a bond of union. The Catholic newspaper supports and de- fends the home, the chool and the Church. ()ur diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it shoula have, as indeed t has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every, priesL - Bishop of Seattle. The.Legion Pledge This coming Sunday at Mass Catholics all over the United States renew their annual Legion of Decency pledge in which , they promise not to patronize theatres which exhibit disrep- utable pictures as a matter of policy. The pledge comes this year at a most opportune time. iT he American people, stinging from a couple of slaps in the face dealt out by the arrogant little men of the motion pic- ;ture world, are intensely annoyed at the whole industry. Last month Hollywood flagrantly disregarded the Legion's Production Code. Last month the industry went on a pil- grimage to Washington and made a mockery out" of the Sssions of the Congress of the United States. The crew from California have outdone themselves in offering insult .  .he decent people who love this, their native land. Remember these facts this coming Sunday at Mass. Western Europe Alive With Gerhardt Eislers By The Observer EXPI)DTNG violence in Palestine presents possibilities oJ a much wider conflagration than this seemingly local problem would at first suggest. If, against all past predictions, the Arabs do carry out their pledge of a holy war, the entire TIiddie East Would be forceful American stand largely determined the outcome of the votes in favor of partition. Great Britain, fearing that the Arabs will carry out their threat of a holy war, preferred finally to oppose partition. Although de- termined to withdra from Pales- tine, sheis not desirous to leave behind a constant state of up- heaval as an open door for pos- sible Soviet intervention. T h e British would surrender this area to U. N. control, if they could be certain that their qfl supply and ommunicat.ion fines are protected. Now, the situation being the op- posite, Great Britain may decide to change her plans or. at least keep powerful military bases in Haifa or elsewhere to protect her interests. Russia Stands To Benefit The only power that would ben- efit from bloodshed in the Middle East is Russia. She, first of all, desires t h a t Britain withdraw from Palestine as soon as possible. Then, that the United States take no active part in restoring order. In a vacuum left by the westsrn powers, she might one day enter as the only savior of the Jewish population from massacre. This would be ideal for the Soviet Un- ion. To attain this end, Russia is reported alreatly assisting both on the move. The first to suffer from it, outside of the Jewish population itself, may prove to be Great Britain, because of her oil mpply lines. Chief beneficiary then would obviously be Russia, the one who tics tried persistently to foment trouble in this ares. No, a single U. N. decision; forced through b y t h e United Staths and the Soviet Union, may precipitate the very upheaval for which the Soviets were working so long. Tlie reaction of many U. N. of- ficia to the Palestine events is " one "of gloom and apprehension. Ther seems to be a realization that this is the decisive hour for :i the organization, on which its en- Je future hinges. For, should U. N. fail to stamp out bloodshed in .Palestine to enforce its decision i ,--partition, the General Assem-i =[jr resolution will remain a I =nere' scrap of paler. Views are I ssed, that such a manifesta- I -of impotence would deal a I --flzlblow to U. N. .. IL N. Has Little Power -'Yet, there is little the U. N. :'tn do right now to compel the warring parties to stop fighting. The American proposal of an in- ternational constabulary force for, Palestine fell through, chiefly be- cause of the Soviet insistence that the great powers exclusively sup- 00usT li BETWEEN US the Gospe--els God's Biography (Written by Rev. Richard Ginder for the Narberth Move- ment, sponsored by the National Council of Catholic Men.) EmknOw that we have souls[ ade by a Creator whom we i call God; and this God is intelli-  .gent. A mar, can learn that much [ by just using his wits. But if God [ is intelligent, He can speak to .us; and if He made the earth, there's nothing to keep Him from coming down and walking on it. As a matter of fact, God has not only spoken to us, but He has come down in person, bringing His message along with Him. The story of His -life on earth, His biography, we call the Gospels. Most of us take them at face value. Whatever the color of our belief may be, we think of the Gospels as being history, at the very least. They are, simply, four separate accounts--two of them written by eye-witnesses, and two by men who had got their facts from eye-withessesmall of them describing the words and works of one person, .Jesus of Nazareth, who lived in the Near East 1900 years ago. Three of those men died rather than disown the truth of what they had put down; and the fourth man, though he escaped alive, was trust into boiling oil for refusing to deny his Story. The enemies of Jesus( and He !has many) have had a great time trying to wriggle out from under the facts set down in IEhe Gos- pels. Their line of argument nearly always follows the sazne pattern: They admit that Jesus worked wonders but, while in early days they usually said He was a magician or used witchcraft, it's more fashionable now to say that He worked His cures by mental suggestion or psychiatry. The strange thing about that charge is it always sounds very likely until we get close up to it.' We've already seen how the Gos- pel writers put down just what they had heard and witnessed. Their writings werd taken at face value by the rest, by the men who had drunk the water-made- wine at Curia, by the men who had seen Jesus walking on the Sea of Galilee. All these people, or many of them, died in support of tha story--and men don't lay down their lives for fable, fiction, or even a probability! sides, one against the other, with instructors, agents and weapons. She is expected to continue to do so, trying at the same time to establish herself as-the number one champion of the Jewish rights in Palestine. Should the Soviet Union in exchange succeed in win- ning the favors o f the Jewish considerable propaganda and P0-i litical influence i n t h e United i States a n d Britain, this would l certainly be a valuable asset for Soviet waning prestige in the democratic world. The Moslems could give them none of ese benefits; this is probably why Rus- sia let. them down. Air the present stage of the game, however, the situation still seems within the realm of rescue. If the worries of the U. N. offi- cials are notto materialize, the] United States must step in and act. If American power is brought to bear behind the effort to ex- tinguish the fire in Palestine, the situation in the iV[iddle East could be saved. On the other hand, failure to solve the problem and force the warring parties to lay down arms, may have very dangerous conse- quences for the whole interna- tional situation. Synchronized with the communist riots in Europe, it can turn Palestine into a replica of the Spanish civil war with foreign interests inciting the fire to burn. ply the contingents. No one, and Not Far Off Vision wanted to see the Red Army ca-  tering Palestine and establishing CATHOLIC -NORTHWEST PROGRESS But Human Mother, Priest Stresses in Catholic Hour "S1/e looked beyond the picture to the person. I am afraid many of us adults do not." In the minds of many "the Mother of God grad- ually comes to mean only a pale statue or a bright picture, a tiny medal or a great stained-glass Window." "Unless we remember that Mary is like ourselves a human creature - . we shall never dare to tug at her robe and ask her to carry our prayers into the presence of her Son," he added. In urging his listeners to beg for favors through Mary, because her intercessory power is almost unlimited, Father Manton stated: "After all, if God our Father gave us the best gift He could give us, His eternal Christmas gift to the world, His own Son, through Mary --would He be loathe to give lesser gifts to us through the same im- maculate hands? If God the Son came to us through Mary, would He be unwilling that we come to there a Soviet bridgehead against the democracies. A U. N. perman- ent police force has not been agreed upon as yet either. Thus, investigation, persuasion and fin- ally economic and diplomatic sanc- tions are the only weapons left. Will they help, once violent emo- tions and inveterate hatreds are unleashed among millions of sav- age Middle Eastern nomads by their fanatical leaders? This is the consideration t h a t worries many people, who see in the im- mediate effects of the U. N. Pal- estine solution a grave warning. What seems certain, however now that the partition plan was adopted, is that the prestige both of the United Nations and of the most influential supporter of the program, the United States, are deeply involved in the peaceful implementation of the decision. American pressure in favor of partition exerted in the final stage of the General Assembly debates, is ascribed by many U. N. obser- vers mainly to reasons of domestic rather than foreign policy. The powerful Jewish pressure groups in America succeeded in chang- ing Jhe U. S. attitude of caution to that of d i re c t intervention There is no doubt, but that the I I A N APPE'AL for Catholics to be- - come more realistic and recog- nize that the Blessed Virgin is not "a lofty, far-off vision floating in a golden mist" but a "human crea- ture" and mother, who is very conscious of our needs and diffi- culties was voiced by the Rev. Joseph Manton, C. SS. R., of the Mission Church, Roxbury, Mass,, on the Catholic Hour Sunday. Father Manton related the story of a four-year-old girl who was taken to the shrine of Our Lady in church on September 8, the feast of Mary's nativity. When her mother told the little tot that it was Mary's birthday, the priest said, she clapped her hands and be- gan singing "Happy Birthday to You," and as she finished she took a deep breath and exclaimed, "Now we have to blow out the candles." Immediately she began to i puff at the line of vigil lights, the i pries added "That youngster at least was a realist,' Father Manton continued. rl . 92act, gg L L MURRAY N.C:W.C. Service Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By Rev. James M. Gillis, C.S.P., Editor The Catholic World The Psalms for Everybody .ELDOM if ever have I used this column as the vehicle fm a book review. I shall not do so now, though perhaps to some readers what I am about to say may seem to be a usur- pation of the book reviewer's prerogative. But the book of which I speak is not a book but part of the book. The book of books is the Bible. No one can review the Bible. One can only recommend it, and that's what I am now doing. Ergo, this not a book review. Q.E.D. More specifically, what I have in mind now to recommend is a particularly useful and beautiful edition of the Book of Psalms, pre- pared by Father Joseph B. Prey, successor to the :late lamented Father Stedman. Being myself an ,earnest ad,ocate of the use of the Psalms by the laity, and having on hundreds of occasions urged the people t6mk the Psalms part of their daily spiritual fare, I ain happy now to say that this new arrangement, titled "My Daily Psalm Book," is in all respects the most attractive and mst nearly ideal edition I have ever seen in English (or in any other language) of the greatest of all books of prayer. How much that book has meant to the Christian people (and indeed to all who love great literature) FR. GILLIS has been eloquently expressed in Rowland Prothero's classic work, "The Psalms in Human Life." He commences in this exalted strain: "Above the couch of David, according to Rabbinical tradition, there hung a harp. The midnight beeze, as it rippled over the strings, made such music that the poet-king was constrained to rise from* his :bed, and, till the dawn flushed the eastern skies, he wedded words to the strains. The poetry of that tradition is condensed in the saying that the Book of Psalms contains the whole music of the heart of man, swept by the hand of his Maker. In it are gathered the lyrical burst of his tenderness, the moan of his penitence, the pathos of his sorrow, the triumph of his victory, the despair of his defeat, the firm- ness of his confidence, the rapture of his assured hope . . . In it are collected' 'sunrise and sunset, birth and death, promise and fulfilment --the whole drama of humanity'." Prothero continues: ',The Psalms are a mirror in which each man sees the motions of his own sofll .... They utter the ordinary ex- periences, the familiar thoughts of men; but they give to these a width of range, an intensity, a depth, and an elevation, which trans- cend the capacity of the most gifted. They translate into speech the spiritual passion of the loftiest genius; they also utter, with the beauty born of truth and simplicity, and with exact agreement be- tween the feeling and the expression, the inarticulate and humble longings of the unlettered peasant. So it is that, in every country, the language of the Psalms has become part of the daily life of na- tions, passing into their proverbs, mingling with their conversation, and used at every critical stage of existence." - . Thousands of equally enthusiastic and eloquent testimonies to the beauty of the Psalms might be culled from the writings of saints, poets, moralists and men of letters. Yet some Catholics, strange to say, have grown up with the notion thatthe Psalms are somehow more appropriate to Protestant than to Catholic worship. Some of our less well instructed brethren even speak of. "Psalm singing" with such an inflection .as to convey contempt. Such persons should read in St. Augustine's "Confessions," the ref- erence to Psalm singing by the congregation in the Cathedral at Milan in St. Ambrose's time, the fifth century. Also it might interest them to know that in Palestine in St. Jerome's day, and under his guidance, there was a group of holy women headed by Paula and Eustochium--antecedents to our communities of nuns and sisters--- who learned Hebrew in order the better to understand the Psalms. i One of them, Paula, wrote to her sister who had remained in Rome: "The ploughman, leamng on his plough-handle, sings in them his praises to God; the sweatingreaper lightens his labors with the chant- ing of the Psalms; the vine-dresser, as he prunes his vines, raises one of the songs of David. 'The Psalms are our poetry, our love-songs, our pastorals, our implements of husbandry'." That was in the latter half of the fourth century; but in the first three centuries, while the Christians were still in'the catacombs, their chief and favorite prayer was the Psalms, All through the ages until today, the liturgy of the Church (that is to say the Divine Office and Mass) has consisted largely of the Psalms. i In recent years successful attempts have been made to re-acquaint the Catholic people with this priceless treasure of their inheritance. The most recent presentation of the Psalms--and, if I may say so with due deference to all others, the most attractive in type, paper, illustrations, suggestions for use, and in general format--is the one just off the press.* If all who read this column were to accept my advice, procure for themselves and for their friends "My Daily Psalm Book" and use it habitually (as they surely will once they see it), I shall feel that I have done a priestly and apostolic work in writing this enthusiastic recommendation. * "My Daily Psalm Book" arranged by Father Prey, Confraternity of the Precious Blood, 5300 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn 19, N Y. Artboard 65 cents; Durocutflush 90 cents; Black Moroc-o $3.75. The Wedding More Leisure-- For What00 THERE are some who incline A to the notion that modern home appliances have released women from the drudgery of housework, are giving her more leisure for -- what? Often for a lot of mischief. Friday, December 12, 1947 I I I REPORT ON SPAIN I 'By R,chard-Pattee )[IV.. The Falange And What It Represents Not one of us Woula willingly ling and Leon Degrelle all in the go back to the broom, a wash- same compartment. ' board in a galvanized tub, the Three definite stages in the de- coal stove or the portable plumb- velopment of the Falange must ing of generations gone by. We]be noted carefully if misconcep- would be a little off our beans to] ti0n about its present role is to throw out the vacuum, the wash-[be avoided: the first or prelimin- ing machine, the gas or electric]cry stage, from its formation in range and the bath tub. But have| 1933 to the civil war; the second these appliances softened o uriduring the civil war When, for beans, making them mushy inside THE words falang and falangism have passed into the po- litical vocabulary of our time as practically synonymous with fascism and totalitarianism. Amazingly little is known in the United States about the Falange---how it started, what it represents, and the extent of its influence in Franco Spain. The c6nfusion about the FaN] 1 ange is a part of .the .general con-linen t w a s intensely nationalist, fusion about Spare tself. Vmwslfirmly anti-Marxist, favorable to concerning !t partake of the same lthe corporate state, and unques- )ver-simplifcatmn that has led so!tionably influenced in appearance many people to lump Hitler, Must and methods by fascism in other solini, Franco, Tiso, Pavelic, Quis- countries. The colored shirt, the symbolism and the tactics bear a remarkable resemblance to those employed in fascist Italy. But to brand Falange as nothing more than a crude imitation of fas- cism is to miss the point entirely. I Falangism was very specifically a Spanish product. On The Record reasons that are part of the war Time and time again Primo de itself, this organization attained Rivera repudiated directly and ira- rather considerable influence; the plicitly any connection with gen- thircL' from 1939 onward, in which eral European fascism and empha- period the Falange no longer oc-sized strong and important diver- cupies the place it once held either gences. In 1935, when Nazism was in the esteem of the Spanish pea- on the upgrade, e asserted in a ple or in affairs of state. Madrid speech that the individual On the evening of October 29, [was all important, that the new" 1933 at a public meeting in Mad-' order must be constructed on the rid's Comedia theatre, a number of enthusiastic young people gath- ered to listen to speeches--noth- ing rare in the agitated atmos- phere of republican Spain. T h e distinctive feature of this meet- ing was that its speakers were not content merely to denounce other parties, but were intent on examining the whole structure of i the state and the parliamentary! bases on which it rested. Spirit Of Consecration Among those who addressed the crowd were Alfonso Garcia Val- decasas, a university professor who some time earlier had organ- ized the Frente Espanol (Spanish Front); Julia Ruiz de Alda, a scientist of some reputation, and Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, son of the dictator Primo de Riv- era and a member of the nobility. It is important to cite these three names among the founders of Falange to indicate that the movement about to be launched was no beer-parlor gathering of street ruffians; or of professional rowdies bent on erecting a scan- dal. Whatever the criticism of the Falange program as later elabor- ated, its founders were impelled by a burning, passionate devotion to Spain and indignation, at the anarchY and confusion that had taken hold of the nation. There was much talk of spiritual values, the liberty of' the human person, the foibles and defects of the party system, and the need for a new spirit of consecration to Spain. Primo de Rivera denounced with special vehemence the sterility of the prevailing party system and the futility of the constant strug- and crusty on top ? If they have shoved US out of the home to jobs we do not need, bridge parties or plain gossip fests, maybe we'd better chuck 'em out after all, even though it seems silly. Because we-do have a job to do. The Judgment is coming, and we've got to give an accounting --NOT on how we used the wash- ing machine, but what we did with the leisure it gave us. It will do no good then to brag about how many sheets we could wash at once, nor how few min- utes it took to do the whole week's laundry. It IS wonderful that we have these labor saving devices. They do save us much physical weari- ness. They keep us rested enough to: Keep the cookie jar full for those hungry-after-school tots; Try out HIS mother's favorite recipe for--was it deep-dish apple pie he was yearning for last night ? Plan and carry through-more parties fo.r the children; Make Sue a dress "like nobody else has"; ; ' Listen intelligently and atten- tively to son Bob's detailed hit- run-error account of the corner baseball contest; Read---especially some of those works about the life we are aim- ing for, so we can enjoy it more fully when we leave this World; Pretty-up for him at the end Of the I day; . . Give a keen ear to his account of how Jones beat him on a big business deal, a n d sympathetic understanding and loving encour- agement for "next time." Little things ? Yes, ever so .little. But added up they are a wife and mother's big job. Added up they make home a refuge because someone is there who has time to care. That someone is you, and modern invention has given you time to make a home where love and ser- enity and charity' and faith and hope are always "tops." Modern invention h a s trans-i formed the door of your home into the gate of heaven on earth IF you cooperate in your LEISURE moments. As we jam our clothes into the washer let's jam thoughts into our minds  thoughts of things to do for them with our free time. Feast Days gle between "left" and "right." It was largely a movement of young men who, in their enthusiasm and ardor, could be compared only to Marxist youth groups. Other figures rapidly came to the fore. Onesimo Redondo, an ac- tive member of Catholic Action, joined the Falange and became one of its leading spokesmen. He brought to the movement a strong religious note and an emphasis on the solid social virtues of the i peasantry. In its early days there was a strong flavor of the rural masses a b o u t Falange and an overwhelming desire to restore to Spain the virtues that formerly had made the nation great. Redondo b a d b e e n affiliated with the Juntas de Ofensiva Na- Sunday, December 14--St. Nlca- sius, Bishop-Mrtyr, and compan- ions. He lived in the 5th century and was Bishop of Rheims. cional Sindicalista (Unions of Na- Monday, December 15---St. Val, tional Syndical Offensive} which, erich, Bisbop-Confessor A 5th created in 1931, had issued a 16- century Bishop, who became the ,pot tathm:ltat:: Zl_ma victim of the persecution of the r tace .. . .. _ s _ - King of the Van, !prgramtt ms" g-rup--aeman-ae o her .nm:s. na  a- Arian, Genseric ,, I among . g , P " cember 16---St. Eu }unity be maintained and separat- esday, De " ism combatted; that the Catholic sebius,. Bishop-Martyr. He. was the ] tradltmn" " be recogm'zed as the ba- scmn of a noble family of Sar- [sis and source of strength of the dinia. He zealously served the |_ ,,^_. ^limination of the narlia- Church at Vercelli and was the' '*"'   . . mentary system m favor of a car choice of clergy and, laity when .-..-H,,, ,,o o,nanmon of Su" o in the episcopal chair became vacant, [n:o'ih'Arica--el:m]nation aof He fought courageously against_  :. -"he renascence of Marxism anu the Arian heretics. Spanish institutions and admins- Wednesday, December 17--t, trations. Lazarus, Bishop-Confessor. He Was These two movemqnts, Falange the disciple and friend of Christ, md JONS, were merged in 1934 who was raised from the dead by with young Primo de Rivera as Our Lord. It is believed that with leader. A 26-point program was his holy sisters, Mary and Martha, worked out containing  most of he journeyed into Gaul and was the principles cited as well as the first Apostle of Southern several new ones. The new move- France, becoming Bishop of Mar- seilles. He is the Patron Saint of that city: Thursday, December 18--SS. Ru- fus and Zosimus, Martyrs. They were martyrs of the early Church, suffering about 109 at Philippi in Macedonia. 00day, othy, Deacon-Martyr. Little is ! known of him other than that he lived in Morocco, Africa, and in defense of his faith was burned to death at the stake. Saturday, December 20--SS. Liberatus and Bajulus, Martyrs. Little is certain of the dates when they lived or wher they suffered martyrdom, although it is believed that they suffered in the East. Their relics are Venerated in Rome. basis of defense of the dignity of the human person. In 1943 he re- fused to attend a fascist congress at Montreux, Switzerland, stating that the Falange was purely na- tional, unrelated to anything hap- pening elsewhere In 1942, when the Axis was triumphant all over Europe, Gar- cia Valdecasas, one of the foun- ders of Falange, denounced as in- tolerable the idea that the State is the end and purpose of man. "The State," he said, "is merely the temporal instrument for the safeguarding of fundamental hu- man values." Primo de Rivera always claimed that his movement was not fas- cist although in a number of mints it coincided with fascist principles as it did with Marxism in the latter's denunciation of the errors and deficiencies of modern capitalism. Up to the time of the civil war the_movement was not of de- cisive importance. It managed to make some progress but not until military operations began did the Falange find a place for itself, Let it be noted very specifically that Franco did not reach power through a party which had existed before the collapse of the repub- lic and on whose shoulders he managed to come out on top. He had no party at all in 1936, nor did he even pretend to head a movement; he was military leader of an attempt by the army to reimpose order. Everything regarding organiza- tion, was the place of Falange and the like came afterwards and, in many cases, the improvisation of th movement--a radically dif- ferent process from what hap- pened in Italy or Germany. Franco found in Falange a movement representing a body of civilians, more or less competent to collaborate with him and to assume administration functions. Later, he insisted on the merging of Falange with o th er groups. This somewhat unwieldy grouping of Traditionalists, Carlists, Fal- angists, and the like forms the basis of the single official party existing in Spain today; and this "shot-gun wedding ' -- as Span- iards describe it  was not en- tirely to the liking of many FaN angists and Carlists. Structure, Not Vital Force When the war ended Falange became the instrument for gov- erning Spain, and Franco bcame its head. In other words, Franco is head of both the Spanish State and the Falange party or "move- meat,", as it is still called in Spain. Just after 1939 prominent mem- bers of Falange were almost the only ones to hold high office or posts of influence; today that has changed considerably. Some mem- bers of the cabinet do not being to the party in the ordinary sense and have never been associated particularly with its activities:: Falange, as a movement, is more a structure than a ital force. The average Spaniard is not much concerned about it andis therefore s o m e w h a t astonished when he learns that, abroad, Fal- angism is still being propped up for frequent and serious whipp- ings. THE MOSCOW LINE Gems From Soviet Broadcasts From a Moscow broadcast in Ara- ble to the Near and Middle East: "In Poland, the Vatican encour- ages the Catholics against the people's government , . . Vatican circles are doing their utmost in an endeavor to smash the reputa- tion of the heroic efforts made and still being made by the peo- ple of Yugoslavia on the path of the resurrection of their homeland . . The Vatican is trying to wear the mask of friendship toward the Arabs . . . Vatican circles support all: element hostile to the pea- pie of the countries of the new democracy." (Moscow Broadcast in Persian to the Near and Middle East:) _ "The velvet glove is gradually slipping off the U. S. iron first. The Marshall Plan is appearing to the people of Europe in its true sJape, the enslavement of Europe. It is now clear and evident to the whole World how right were the people of eastern Europe who re- fused the htlmiliation of bowing to the dollar," :) 907Terry Avenue, Seattle (4) tJnterecl as Seond-Class Matter.at the Postofflce at Seattle February 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 WILI.,IAM P. O'CONNELL - I--:. ANDREW PROUTY , Managing Edjtor Editor Published by the Northwest Progress Co. PreValent, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughney, S-M., S.TJ. . Bishop of Seattle The Catholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function ; as the o-ficial newspaper of our diocese. It is a necessary .... channel 0f information and instruction and a bond of union. The Catholic newspaper supports and de- fends the home, the chool and the Church. ()ur diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it shoula have, as indeed t has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every, priesL - Bishop of Seattle. The.Legion Pledge This coming Sunday at Mass Catholics all over the United States renew their annual Legion of Decency pledge in which , they promise not to patronize theatres which exhibit disrep- utable pictures as a matter of policy. The pledge comes this year at a most opportune time. iT he American people, stinging from a couple of slaps in the face dealt out by the arrogant little men of the motion pic- ;ture world, are intensely annoyed at the whole industry. Last month Hollywood flagrantly disregarded the Legion's Production Code. Last month the industry went on a pil- grimage to Washington and made a mockery out" of the Sssions of the Congress of the United States. The crew from California have outdone themselves in offering insult .  .he decent people who love this, their native land. Remember these facts this coming Sunday at Mass. Western Europe Alive With Gerhardt Eislers By The Observer EXPI)DTNG violence in Palestine presents possibilities oJ a much wider conflagration than this seemingly local problem would at first suggest. If, against all past predictions, the Arabs do carry out their pledge of a holy war, the entire TIiddie East Would be forceful American stand largely determined the outcome of the votes in favor of partition. Great Britain, fearing that the Arabs will carry out their threat of a holy war, preferred finally to oppose partition. Although de- termined to withdra from Pales- tine, sheis not desirous to leave behind a constant state of up- heaval as an open door for pos- sible Soviet intervention. T h e British would surrender this area to U. N. control, if they could be certain that their qfl supply and ommunicat.ion fines are protected. Now, the situation being the op- posite, Great Britain may decide to change her plans or. at least keep powerful military bases in Haifa or elsewhere to protect her interests. Russia Stands To Benefit The only power that would ben- efit from bloodshed in the Middle East is Russia. She, first of all, desires t h a t Britain withdraw from Palestine as soon as possible. Then, that the United States take no active part in restoring order. In a vacuum left by the westsrn powers, she might one day enter as the only savior of the Jewish population from massacre. This would be ideal for the Soviet Un- ion. To attain this end, Russia is reported alreatly assisting both on the move. The first to suffer from it, outside of the Jewish population itself, may prove to be Great Britain, because of her oil mpply lines. Chief beneficiary then would obviously be Russia, the one who tics tried persistently to foment trouble in this ares. No, a single U. N. decision; forced through b y t h e United Staths and the Soviet Union, may precipitate the very upheaval for which the Soviets were working so long. Tlie reaction of many U. N. of- ficia to the Palestine events is " one "of gloom and apprehension. Ther seems to be a realization that this is the decisive hour for :i the organization, on which its en- Je future hinges. For, should U. N. fail to stamp out bloodshed in .Palestine to enforce its decision i ,--partition, the General Assem-i =[jr resolution will remain a I =nere' scrap of paler. Views are I ssed, that such a manifesta- I -of impotence would deal a I --flzlblow to U. N. .. IL N. Has Little Power -'Yet, there is little the U. N. :'tn do right now to compel the warring parties to stop fighting. The American proposal of an in- ternational constabulary force for, Palestine fell through, chiefly be- cause of the Soviet insistence that the great powers exclusively sup- 00usT li BETWEEN US the Gospe--els God's Biography (Written by Rev. Richard Ginder for the Narberth Move- ment, sponsored by the National Council of Catholic Men.) EmknOw that we have souls[ ade by a Creator whom we i call God; and this God is intelli-  .gent. A mar, can learn that much [ by just using his wits. But if God [ is intelligent, He can speak to .us; and if He made the earth, there's nothing to keep Him from coming down and walking on it. As a matter of fact, God has not only spoken to us, but He has come down in person, bringing His message along with Him. The story of His -life on earth, His biography, we call the Gospels. Most of us take them at face value. Whatever the color of our belief may be, we think of the Gospels as being history, at the very least. They are, simply, four separate accounts--two of them written by eye-witnesses, and two by men who had got their facts from eye-withessesmall of them describing the words and works of one person, .Jesus of Nazareth, who lived in the Near East 1900 years ago. Three of those men died rather than disown the truth of what they had put down; and the fourth man, though he escaped alive, was trust into boiling oil for refusing to deny his Story. The enemies of Jesus( and He !has many) have had a great time trying to wriggle out from under the facts set down in IEhe Gos- pels. Their line of argument nearly always follows the sazne pattern: They admit that Jesus worked wonders but, while in early days they usually said He was a magician or used witchcraft, it's more fashionable now to say that He worked His cures by mental suggestion or psychiatry. The strange thing about that charge is it always sounds very likely until we get close up to it.' We've already seen how the Gos- pel writers put down just what they had heard and witnessed. Their writings werd taken at face value by the rest, by the men who had drunk the water-made- wine at Curia, by the men who had seen Jesus walking on the Sea of Galilee. All these people, or many of them, died in support of tha story--and men don't lay down their lives for fable, fiction, or even a probability! sides, one against the other, with instructors, agents and weapons. She is expected to continue to do so, trying at the same time to establish herself as-the number one champion of the Jewish rights in Palestine. Should the Soviet Union in exchange succeed in win- ning the favors o f the Jewish considerable propaganda and P0-i litical influence i n t h e United i States a n d Britain, this would l certainly be a valuable asset for Soviet waning prestige in the democratic world. The Moslems could give them none of ese benefits; this is probably why Rus- sia let. them down. Air the present stage of the game, however, the situation still seems within the realm of rescue. If the worries of the U. N. offi- cials are notto materialize, the] United States must step in and act. If American power is brought to bear behind the effort to ex- tinguish the fire in Palestine, the situation in the iV[iddle East could be saved. On the other hand, failure to solve the problem and force the warring parties to lay down arms, may have very dangerous conse- quences for the whole interna- tional situation. Synchronized with the communist riots in Europe, it can turn Palestine into a replica of the Spanish civil war with foreign interests inciting the fire to burn. ply the contingents. No one, and Not Far Off Vision wanted to see the Red Army ca-  tering Palestine and establishing CATHOLIC -NORTHWEST PROGRESS But Human Mother, Priest Stresses in Catholic Hour "S1/e looked beyond the picture to the person. I am afraid many of us adults do not." In the minds of many "the Mother of God grad- ually comes to mean only a pale statue or a bright picture, a tiny medal or a great stained-glass Window." "Unless we remember that Mary is like ourselves a human creature - . we shall never dare to tug at her robe and ask her to carry our prayers into the presence of her Son," he added. In urging his listeners to beg for favors through Mary, because her intercessory power is almost unlimited, Father Manton stated: "After all, if God our Father gave us the best gift He could give us, His eternal Christmas gift to the world, His own Son, through Mary --would He be loathe to give lesser gifts to us through the same im- maculate hands? If God the Son came to us through Mary, would He be unwilling that we come to there a Soviet bridgehead against the democracies. A U. N. perman- ent police force has not been agreed upon as yet either. Thus, investigation, persuasion and fin- ally economic and diplomatic sanc- tions are the only weapons left. Will they help, once violent emo- tions and inveterate hatreds are unleashed among millions of sav- age Middle Eastern nomads by their fanatical leaders? This is the consideration t h a t worries many people, who see in the im- mediate effects of the U. N. Pal- estine solution a grave warning. What seems certain, however now that the partition plan was adopted, is that the prestige both of the United Nations and of the most influential supporter of the program, the United States, are deeply involved in the peaceful implementation of the decision. American pressure in favor of partition exerted in the final stage of the General Assembly debates, is ascribed by many U. N. obser- vers mainly to reasons of domestic rather than foreign policy. The powerful Jewish pressure groups in America succeeded in chang- ing Jhe U. S. attitude of caution to that of d i re c t intervention There is no doubt, but that the I I A N APPE'AL for Catholics to be- - come more realistic and recog- nize that the Blessed Virgin is not "a lofty, far-off vision floating in a golden mist" but a "human crea- ture" and mother, who is very conscious of our needs and diffi- culties was voiced by the Rev. Joseph Manton, C. SS. R., of the Mission Church, Roxbury, Mass,, on the Catholic Hour Sunday. Father Manton related the story of a four-year-old girl who was taken to the shrine of Our Lady in church on September 8, the feast of Mary's nativity. When her mother told the little tot that it was Mary's birthday, the priest said, she clapped her hands and be- gan singing "Happy Birthday to You," and as she finished she took a deep breath and exclaimed, "Now we have to blow out the candles." Immediately she began to i puff at the line of vigil lights, the i pries added "That youngster at least was a realist,' Father Manton continued. rl . 92act, gg L L MURRAY N.C:W.C. Service Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By Rev. James M. Gillis, C.S.P., Editor The Catholic World The Psalms for Everybody .ELDOM if ever have I used this column as the vehicle fm a book review. I shall not do so now, though perhaps to some readers what I am about to say may seem to be a usur- pation of the book reviewer's prerogative. But the book of which I speak is not a book but part of the book. The book of books is the Bible. No one can review the Bible. One can only recommend it, and that's what I am now doing. Ergo, this not a book review. Q.E.D. More specifically, what I have in mind now to recommend is a particularly useful and beautiful edition of the Book of Psalms, pre- pared by Father Joseph B. Prey, successor to the :late lamented Father Stedman. Being myself an ,earnest ad,ocate of the use of the Psalms by the laity, and having on hundreds of occasions urged the people t6mk the Psalms part of their daily spiritual fare, I ain happy now to say that this new arrangement, titled "My Daily Psalm Book," is in all respects the most attractive and mst nearly ideal edition I have ever seen in English (or in any other language) of the greatest of all books of prayer. How much that book has meant to the Christian people (and indeed to all who love great literature) FR. GILLIS has been eloquently expressed in Rowland Prothero's classic work, "The Psalms in Human Life." He commences in this exalted strain: "Above the couch of David, according to Rabbinical tradition, there hung a harp. The midnight beeze, as it rippled over the strings, made such music that the poet-king was constrained to rise from* his :bed, and, till the dawn flushed the eastern skies, he wedded words to the strains. The poetry of that tradition is condensed in the saying that the Book of Psalms contains the whole music of the heart of man, swept by the hand of his Maker. In it are gathered the lyrical burst of his tenderness, the moan of his penitence, the pathos of his sorrow, the triumph of his victory, the despair of his defeat, the firm- ness of his confidence, the rapture of his assured hope . . . In it are collected' 'sunrise and sunset, birth and death, promise and fulfilment --the whole drama of humanity'." Prothero continues: ',The Psalms are a mirror in which each man sees the motions of his own sofll .... They utter the ordinary ex- periences, the familiar thoughts of men; but they give to these a width of range, an intensity, a depth, and an elevation, which trans- cend the capacity of the most gifted. They translate into speech the spiritual passion of the loftiest genius; they also utter, with the beauty born of truth and simplicity, and with exact agreement be- tween the feeling and the expression, the inarticulate and humble longings of the unlettered peasant. So it is that, in every country, the language of the Psalms has become part of the daily life of na- tions, passing into their proverbs, mingling with their conversation, and used at every critical stage of existence." - . Thousands of equally enthusiastic and eloquent testimonies to the beauty of the Psalms might be culled from the writings of saints, poets, moralists and men of letters. Yet some Catholics, strange to say, have grown up with the notion thatthe Psalms are somehow more appropriate to Protestant than to Catholic worship. Some of our less well instructed brethren even speak of. "Psalm singing" with such an inflection .as to convey contempt. Such persons should read in St. Augustine's "Confessions," the ref- erence to Psalm singing by the congregation in the Cathedral at Milan in St. Ambrose's time, the fifth century. Also it might interest them to know that in Palestine in St. Jerome's day, and under his guidance, there was a group of holy women headed by Paula and Eustochium--antecedents to our communities of nuns and sisters--- who learned Hebrew in order the better to understand the Psalms. i One of them, Paula, wrote to her sister who had remained in Rome: "The ploughman, leamng on his plough-handle, sings in them his praises to God; the sweatingreaper lightens his labors with the chant- ing of the Psalms; the vine-dresser, as he prunes his vines, raises one of the songs of David. 'The Psalms are our poetry, our love-songs, our pastorals, our implements of husbandry'." That was in the latter half of the fourth century; but in the first three centuries, while the Christians were still in'the catacombs, their chief and favorite prayer was the Psalms, All through the ages until today, the liturgy of the Church (that is to say the Divine Office and Mass) has consisted largely of the Psalms. i In recent years successful attempts have been made to re-acquaint the Catholic people with this priceless treasure of their inheritance. The most recent presentation of the Psalms--and, if I may say so with due deference to all others, the most attractive in type, paper, illustrations, suggestions for use, and in general format--is the one just off the press.* If all who read this column were to accept my advice, procure for themselves and for their friends "My Daily Psalm Book" and use it habitually (as they surely will once they see it), I shall feel that I have done a priestly and apostolic work in writing this enthusiastic recommendation. * "My Daily Psalm Book" arranged by Father Prey, Confraternity of the Precious Blood, 5300 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn 19, N Y. Artboard 65 cents; Durocutflush 90 cents; Black Moroc-o $3.75. The Wedding More Leisure-- For What00 THERE are some who incline A to the notion that modern home appliances have released women from the drudgery of housework, are giving her more leisure for -- what? Often for a lot of mischief. Friday, December 12, 1947 I I I REPORT ON SPAIN I 'By R,chard-Pattee )[IV.. The Falange And What It Represents Not one of us Woula willingly ling and Leon Degrelle all in the go back to the broom, a wash- same compartment. ' board in a galvanized tub, the Three definite stages in the de- coal stove or the portable plumb- velopment of the Falange must ing of generations gone by. We]be noted carefully if misconcep- would be a little off our beans to] ti0n about its present role is to throw out the vacuum, the wash-[be avoided: the first or prelimin- ing machine, the gas or electric]cry stage, from its formation in range and the bath tub. But have| 1933 to the civil war; the second these appliances softened o uriduring the civil war When, for beans, making them mushy inside THE words falang and falangism have passed into the po- litical vocabulary of our time as practically synonymous with fascism and totalitarianism. Amazingly little is known in the United States about the Falange---how it started, what it represents, and the extent of its influence in Franco Spain. The c6nfusion about the FaN] 1 ange is a part of .the .general con-linen t w a s intensely nationalist, fusion about Spare tself. Vmwslfirmly anti-Marxist, favorable to concerning !t partake of the same lthe corporate state, and unques- )ver-simplifcatmn that has led so!tionably influenced in appearance many people to lump Hitler, Must and methods by fascism in other solini, Franco, Tiso, Pavelic, Quis- countries. The colored shirt, the symbolism and the tactics bear a remarkable resemblance to those employed in fascist Italy. But to brand Falange as nothing more than a crude imitation of fas- cism is to miss the point entirely. I Falangism was very specifically a Spanish product. On The Record reasons that are part of the war Time and time again Primo de itself, this organization attained Rivera repudiated directly and ira- rather considerable influence; the plicitly any connection with gen- thircL' from 1939 onward, in which eral European fascism and empha- period the Falange no longer oc-sized strong and important diver- cupies the place it once held either gences. In 1935, when Nazism was in the esteem of the Spanish pea- on the upgrade, e asserted in a ple or in affairs of state. Madrid speech that the individual On the evening of October 29, [was all important, that the new" 1933 at a public meeting in Mad-' order must be constructed on the rid's Comedia theatre, a number of enthusiastic young people gath- ered to listen to speeches--noth- ing rare in the agitated atmos- phere of republican Spain. T h e distinctive feature of this meet- ing was that its speakers were not content merely to denounce other parties, but were intent on examining the whole structure of i the state and the parliamentary! bases on which it rested. Spirit Of Consecration Among those who addressed the crowd were Alfonso Garcia Val- decasas, a university professor who some time earlier had organ- ized the Frente Espanol (Spanish Front); Julia Ruiz de Alda, a scientist of some reputation, and Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, son of the dictator Primo de Riv- era and a member of the nobility. It is important to cite these three names among the founders of Falange to indicate that the movement about to be launched was no beer-parlor gathering of street ruffians; or of professional rowdies bent on erecting a scan- dal. Whatever the criticism of the Falange program as later elabor- ated, its founders were impelled by a burning, passionate devotion to Spain and indignation, at the anarchY and confusion that had taken hold of the nation. There was much talk of spiritual values, the liberty of' the human person, the foibles and defects of the party system, and the need for a new spirit of consecration to Spain. Primo de Rivera denounced with special vehemence the sterility of the prevailing party system and the futility of the constant strug- and crusty on top ? If they have shoved US out of the home to jobs we do not need, bridge parties or plain gossip fests, maybe we'd better chuck 'em out after all, even though it seems silly. Because we-do have a job to do. The Judgment is coming, and we've got to give an accounting --NOT on how we used the wash- ing machine, but what we did with the leisure it gave us. It will do no good then to brag about how many sheets we could wash at once, nor how few min- utes it took to do the whole week's laundry. It IS wonderful that we have these labor saving devices. They do save us much physical weari- ness. They keep us rested enough to: Keep the cookie jar full for those hungry-after-school tots; Try out HIS mother's favorite recipe for--was it deep-dish apple pie he was yearning for last night ? Plan and carry through-more parties fo.r the children; Make Sue a dress "like nobody else has"; ; ' Listen intelligently and atten- tively to son Bob's detailed hit- run-error account of the corner baseball contest; Read---especially some of those works about the life we are aim- ing for, so we can enjoy it more fully when we leave this World; Pretty-up for him at the end Of the I day; . . Give a keen ear to his account of how Jones beat him on a big business deal, a n d sympathetic understanding and loving encour- agement for "next time." Little things ? Yes, ever so .little. But added up they are a wife and mother's big job. Added up they make home a refuge because someone is there who has time to care. That someone is you, and modern invention has given you time to make a home where love and ser- enity and charity' and faith and hope are always "tops." Modern invention h a s trans-i formed the door of your home into the gate of heaven on earth IF you cooperate in your LEISURE moments. As we jam our clothes into the washer let's jam thoughts into our minds  thoughts of things to do for them with our free time. Feast Days gle between "left" and "right." It was largely a movement of young men who, in their enthusiasm and ardor, could be compared only to Marxist youth groups. Other figures rapidly came to the fore. Onesimo Redondo, an ac- tive member of Catholic Action, joined the Falange and became one of its leading spokesmen. He brought to the movement a strong religious note and an emphasis on the solid social virtues of the i peasantry. In its early days there was a strong flavor of the rural masses a b o u t Falange and an overwhelming desire to restore to Spain the virtues that formerly had made the nation great. Redondo b a d b e e n affiliated with the Juntas de Ofensiva Na- Sunday, December 14--St. Nlca- sius, Bishop-Mrtyr, and compan- ions. He lived in the 5th century and was Bishop of Rheims. cional Sindicalista (Unions of Na- Monday, December 15---St. Val, tional Syndical Offensive} which, erich, Bisbop-Confessor A 5th created in 1931, had issued a 16- century Bishop, who became the ,pot tathm:ltat:: Zl_ma victim of the persecution of the r tace .. . .. _ s _ - King of the Van, !prgramtt ms" g-rup--aeman-ae o her .nm:s. na  a- Arian, Genseric ,, I among . g , P " cember 16---St. Eu }unity be maintained and separat- esday, De " ism combatted; that the Catholic sebius,. Bishop-Martyr. He. was the ] tradltmn" " be recogm'zed as the ba- scmn of a noble family of Sar- [sis and source of strength of the dinia. He zealously served the |_ ,,^_. ^limination of the narlia- Church at Vercelli and was the' '*"'   . . mentary system m favor of a car choice of clergy and, laity when .-..-H,,, ,,o o,nanmon of Su" o in the episcopal chair became vacant, [n:o'ih'Arica--el:m]nation aof He fought courageously against_  :. -"he renascence of Marxism anu the Arian heretics. Spanish institutions and admins- Wednesday, December 17--t, trations. Lazarus, Bishop-Confessor. He Was These two movemqnts, Falange the disciple and friend of Christ, md JONS, were merged in 1934 who was raised from the dead by with young Primo de Rivera as Our Lord. It is believed that with leader. A 26-point program was his holy sisters, Mary and Martha, worked out containing  most of he journeyed into Gaul and was the principles cited as well as the first Apostle of Southern several new ones. The new move- France, becoming Bishop of Mar- seilles. He is the Patron Saint of that city: Thursday, December 18--SS. Ru- fus and Zosimus, Martyrs. They were martyrs of the early Church, suffering about 109 at Philippi in Macedonia. 00day, othy, Deacon-Martyr. Little is ! known of him other than that he lived in Morocco, Africa, and in defense of his faith was burned to death at the stake. Saturday, December 20--SS. Liberatus and Bajulus, Martyrs. Little is certain of the dates when they lived or wher they suffered martyrdom, although it is believed that they suffered in the East. Their relics are Venerated in Rome. basis of defense of the dignity of the human person. In 1943 he re- fused to attend a fascist congress at Montreux, Switzerland, stating that the Falange was purely na- tional, unrelated to anything hap- pening elsewhere In 1942, when the Axis was triumphant all over Europe, Gar- cia Valdecasas, one of the foun- ders of Falange, denounced as in- tolerable the idea that the State is the end and purpose of man. "The State," he said, "is merely the temporal instrument for the safeguarding of fundamental hu- man values." Primo de Rivera always claimed that his movement was not fas- cist although in a number of mints it coincided with fascist principles as it did with Marxism in the latter's denunciation of the errors and deficiencies of modern capitalism. Up to the time of the civil war the_movement was not of de- cisive importance. It managed to make some progress but not until military operations began did the Falange find a place for itself, Let it be noted very specifically that Franco did not reach power through a party which had existed before the collapse of the repub- lic and on whose shoulders he managed to come out on top. He had no party at all in 1936, nor did he even pretend to head a movement; he was military leader of an attempt by the army to reimpose order. Everything regarding organiza- tion, was the place of Falange and the like came afterwards and, in many cases, the improvisation of th movement--a radically dif- ferent process from what hap- pened in Italy or Germany. Franco found in Falange a movement representing a body of civilians, more or less competent to collaborate with him and to assume administration functions. Later, he insisted on the merging of Falange with o th er groups. This somewhat unwieldy grouping of Traditionalists, Carlists, Fal- angists, and the like forms the basis of the single official party existing in Spain today; and this "shot-gun wedding ' -- as Span- iards describe it  was not en- tirely to the liking of many FaN angists and Carlists. Structure, Not Vital Force When the war ended Falange became the instrument for gov- erning Spain, and Franco bcame its head. In other words, Franco is head of both the Spanish State and the Falange party or "move- meat,", as it is still called in Spain. Just after 1939 prominent mem- bers of Falange were almost the only ones to hold high office or posts of influence; today that has changed considerably. Some mem- bers of the cabinet do not being to the party in the ordinary sense and have never been associated particularly with its activities:: Falange, as a movement, is more a structure than a ital force. The average Spaniard is not much concerned about it andis therefore s o m e w h a t astonished when he learns that, abroad, Fal- angism is still being propped up for frequent and serious whipp- ings. THE MOSCOW LINE Gems From Soviet Broadcasts From a Moscow broadcast in Ara- ble to the Near and Middle East: "In Poland, the Vatican encour- ages the Catholics against the people's government , . . Vatican circles are doing their utmost in an endeavor to smash the reputa- tion of the heroic efforts made and still being made by the peo- ple of Yugoslavia on the path of the resurrection of their homeland . . The Vatican is trying to wear the mask of friendship toward the Arabs . . . Vatican circles support all: element hostile to the pea- pie of the countries of the new democracy." (Moscow Broadcast in Persian to the Near and Middle East:) _ "The velvet glove is gradually slipping off the U. S. iron first. The Marshall Plan is appearing to the people of Europe in its true sJape, the enslavement of Europe. It is now clear and evident to the whole World how right were the people of eastern Europe who re- fused the htlmiliation of bowing to the dollar," :)