Newspaper Archive of
Catholic Northwest Progress
Seattle, Washington
November 30, 1962     Catholic Northwest Progress
PAGE 5     (5 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 5     (5 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 30, 1962
 

Newspaper Archive of Catholic Northwest Progress produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Fr;cly, Nov. 30, I;62 THE PRORESS--5 Chain Of Love Safari by Jet, Through Africa and Asia, by Sister Maria del Rey of Maryknoll, Charles Scribner's Sons, 308 pp., $5.95. HERE is a delightful pic- ture on the dust jacket of this book. It portrays a long line of children stretched hand- in-hand along a river bank in the Orient. Photographically, artistically it is splendid, with the white river gravel slashed along the base of dark wooded hills, the children frozen in the light-hearted attitudes of their play. It is also a splendid record of the humanity of the mis- sion Sister. There is one in the playing line of kids, and if it were not for her white habit she could be mistaken for a big child. And that is the idea is it not, that we become as children. Sister Maria del Rey com- bines the best of childlike sim- plicity and penetrating em- pathy in her writing. She is an accomplished practiser of the craft of writing, practised in the good sense that she has a faultless style, pristine syntax, and yet retains a freshness, al- most a naivity, which is with- out force or guile. She records her experiences with the unsophisticated eyes of love and recognizes Christ in beggar children, lepers, and South Pacific dancers, all peo- ples in some mighty all but forgotten corners of God's cre- ation. In this book, Sister Maria del Rey accompanies Mother General Mary Colman of the Maryknoll Sisters on one of her periodic visitations required by the Church. This trip flings these two untiring travelers through India, Africa, the Ori- ent, and the South Pacific. It is a cliche to report that By JOHN J. ECKHART an author has gotten to "know the people." Sister Maria knows them all right, but she knows them as brothers and sisters in Christ, and this makes the difference. Some of her stories ring with laughter and some honest reactions to native ways. O t h e r stories sound a sadder note as she re- ports on spiritual and physical conditions in some pathetic in- stances. But in all instances she writes of her respect for other ways. This is reflected in her story of the very pretty hip-switching South Is- land girl doing the bamboo dance who, a month later, became a Sister. In all of her reflections the authoress, w i t h o u t trying, speeds us along a safari, a travelogue, an armchair cruise with purpose. No one is a for- eigner to Sister Maria del Rey, and her writings, especially this book, should aid any read- er in a finer understanding of mission work, and the chain of love that binds us all. The Satan Bug, by Ian Stuart, Charles Scrib- ner's Sons, 270 pp., $3.95. Attention all mystery fans! This is a wowser, as we would expect from the type- writer of Inn Stuart. The Satan Bug is a powder so re- fined that one teaspoon tipped upside down would kill all life in England in 10 days, all life in the world within two months, down to the primitive native existing on Tierra del Fuego. This is pretty potent pota- toes. The bad guy gets it, and from then on the fun and laughs begin. It is a good book, a fast paced book, a book written by a real maes- tro in his field, and a secular Feature Films Bellingham KVOS-TV Channel 12 Seattle KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 On Television KING-TV (NBC) Channel 5 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel 11 KTVW-TV Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-l--Morally Unobjectionable for General Patronage; A-II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-eli--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults; B--Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C--Condemned; SC--Separate Classification; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films before being shown on tele. vision are edited to conform to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, objectionable Darts contained in the original plot may be deleted in the television version and thus the original Legion rating may not be entirely correct.) SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 2:00 P.m.KOMO-TV--Unseen Enemy .................................... A-I 2:0(I P.m.KVO$-TV--Key Largo ........................................ A-II 2:30 P.m.KING-TV--YelIow Jack ....................................... A.I 3:00 P.m.KIRO-TV--Huekleberry Finn .................................. NR 4:00 P.m.--KTVW-TV--Overland Telegraph ................................ A-I $:30 P.m.wKTVW-TV--Moke Way for a Lady ............................ A-I 8:00 P.m.KTVW-TV--Long Lost Father .................................. NR 9:00 P.m.KING-TV--Night PeopM ....................................... A-II 11:00 P.m.--KIRO-TV--Lody In the Dark ................................... B 11:00 P.m.KVOS-TV--Moglc Town ...................................... A-II 11:1S P.m.KOMO-TV--Ponlc In the Streets ................................ a 11:35 P.m.--KING-TV--Crlmson Pirate ..................................... A-! SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2 2:00 Lm.KVO$-TV--Your Past Is Showing ............................ A-II 2:00 Lm.--KING-TV--Chlno Soas .......................................... NR 3:00 ,.m.KIRO-TV--Beyond Glory ....................................... A-I 4:00 Lm.--KOMO-TV--Riders to the Stars ................................ A-I 4:30 Lm.KTNT-TV--DImples ............................................ A-I 4:30 ,.m.--KTVW-TV--Bed of Roses ....................... , .............. NR 6:00 ,.m.KVOS-TV--Joguar .............................................. A-I )':30 ,.m.KTNT-TV--DIve Bomber . ...................................... A-I 8:00 ,.m.KTVW-TV--Don't Tell the Wife ................................ A-I 0:00 ,.m.KOMO-TV--GaHont Hours ...................................... A.I 9:30 Lm.KTNT-TV--Untamed Africa .................................... NR i!:35 ).m.--KING-TV--The Golden Fleecing ............................... A-I MONDAY, DECEMBER 3 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TVFrlsca LIII ........................................ A-I 10:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--The Lady Consents ................................ NR 1:30 ,.m.KTVW-TVThe Fountain ...................................... NR 2:30 Lm.--KTNT-TV--Wlnner Take All ..................................... B 3:30 ).m.--KING-TV--Edword, MY Son (Port i) .......................... B 5:30 ).m.--KVOS-TV--GuIllvor's Trove;s .................................. A-I 6:00 Lm.--KTVW-TV--Americon Empire .................................. A-I 10:00 ).m.--KTVW-TV--Long Voyage Homo ................................ A-If 10:30 =.m.KTNT-TV--Bewore, My Lovely ............................... A-II 11:00 =.m,KVOS-TV--Four Days Leave ................................. A-II 11:30 ).m.--KOMO.TV--Post Office Investigator ........................... NR TUESDAY, DECEMaER 4 9:30 a.m.--KOMO-TV--Devil's Mask ..................................... A-If 10:00 o.m,--KTVW-TV--FoIcon in Mexico .................................. A-II 1:30 P.m.--KTVW-TV--Look Who's Laughlng .............................. A.I 2:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--DevII's Cargo ................................... A-II 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV--Edword, My Son (Part II) .......................... a 5:30 P.m.--KVOS-TV--Montana Belle .................................... B 6:00 P.m.--KTVW-TV--Hunchback of Notre Dame ....................... A-II 10:30 p.m.KTNT.TV--The Sisters ........................................ A-If 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--The Locket ........................................ A.II 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--One More Tomorrow ................................ B 11:30 p.m.KOMO-TV--Federal Agents at Large ......................... A-II WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER $ 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TV--Fnther Was a Fullback ............................ A-II 10:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--StrlctW Dcnamite ............................... NR 11:30 a.m.--KIRO-TV--Women Without Names ............................ A.II 1:30 P.m.--KTVW-TV--The Locket ........................................ A-II 2:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--Ever In MY Heart .................................. NR 3:30 p.m.KING.TV--HeWs Island ......................................... a 5:30 p.m.KVOS.TV--To the Victor ....................................... A-I 6:00 p.m.KTVW.TV--Sundown ........................................... A-II 10:30 p.m.KTNT-TVlndiscretion of an American Wife ................ A-II 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Stogecoach ........................................ A-II 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--The Mnn I Love .................................... S 11:30 P.m.--KOMO-TV--Men in Her Life ................................ A-II THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6 9:30 a.m.--KOMO-TV--The Invisible Woman ............................... B 10:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--Sued for Libel ..................................... A-I 1:00 Lm.--KTVW-TV--F:mplre ........................................... NR 2:30 ).m.KTNT-TV--The Escape ........................................ A.II 3:30 ,m.--KING-TV--Men In White ...................................... NR S:30 Lm.--KVOS-TV--Desert Sands ...................................... A-II 6:00 ,.m.--KTVW.TV--Best of the Badmen ................................. B 6:30 ).m.KIRO-TV--I Died a Thousand Times ......................... A.II 10:00 ).m.KTVW-TV--My Favorite Wife ................................... B 10:30 ).m.KTNT-TV--So Little Time ..................................... NR 11:00 ,.m.--KVOS-TV--The Dolly Sisters ..................................... a 11:30 ).m.--KOMO-TV--Sabre Jet ...................................... A-I FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 9:30 o,m.KOMO-TV--Bost Man Wins ..................................... B 10:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--Weekend tar Three ................................ A-II 1:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--My Favorite Wife .................................. B 2:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--Unlon Depot ........................................ NR 3:30 p.m.K ING-TV--Mon- Proof ................................... . ...... A-ll 5:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Oklahomo Kid ...................................... A-tl 6:00 p.m.KTVW-TVThe Whip Hand .......... , ......................... A-I 10:00 p m.--KTVW-TV--CrlmEnOl Court ................................... A-H 10:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--The Fighting '69th ................................. A-I 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Impact ...................................... g 11:30 p.m.KOMO.TV--Carbine Williams .................................. A-II r This Review Is Sponsored by Catholic Gifts & Church Goods, Inc. Religious qodds tar the home, church end school. A ottasant shupplng etmosph.re with i select vari. ety of religious gifts. 607 Union St., Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 i Hi John Eekha book that does not have to steal popularity through the bedchamber. Not one overblown female pants after the hero. Stuart need not use this device. His stories stand on their own de- serving merits as reflected in his plot development and char- acter delineation. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2 8:30 a.m., Look Up and Live, KIRO-TV, Channel 7. Lea Wallace, children's pup peteer, will convey the story of Christmas to pre-school audi- ence with a one-act fantasy, "How the Great Guest Came," the story of a German shoe- maker and how Jesus came to visit him on Christmas Eve. 4:00 p.m., Directions '03, KOMO-TV, Channel 4. Four Catholic editors review major religious news stories of the past year on today's pro- gram. The host is James O'Gara, managing editor of Commonweal. Guests are Rev. Thurston Davis, S.J., editor in chief of America; Robert Hoyt, editor of the Catholic Report- er, newspaper of the Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese and another editor to be announced. 6:00 p.m., Challenge, KOMO- TV, Channel 4. The Rev. William Treacy, Rabbi Raphael Levine and Dr. Lynn Carson explore the topic "State Welfare -- Our Atti- tudes." The same program is heard on KOMO-Radio Sunday night at 10:30 p.m. 7:15 p.m., Sacred Heart Pro- gram, KTVW-TV, Channel 13. "Maturity in Our Judgment of Prejudice" is the title of today's talk by Rev. Eugene P. Murphy, S.J., national director of the Sacred Heart Program. Legion Of Decency Listed here are ratings of the retest films received by the Na- tional Legion of Decency. First-Run Movies Showing In Seattle A-1 -- Gigot. A-2 -- The Miracle Worker. Other Movies Currently Showing A-I--Cash On Demand, Best of Enemies, Music Man, The Oklahoman, Damn the Defiant. A-2--My Geisha, Spiral Road, Girls Girls Girls, Lisa, Young Savages. AI3 -- Sweet Bird of Youth, Boys Night Out, Two Women, The Interns, Whatever Hap- pened to Baby Jane?, Period of Adjustment, Pillow Talk, Op- eration Petticoat, I Like Money, Sergeants 3. B -- It Happened In Athens, Confessions of An Opium Eater. Condemned--Jules and Jim. Separate C I a s s ification --. Lolita, La Dolce Vita, Sky Above, the Mud Below. Wanting vs Lacking By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SHEEN he rich are becoming richer, the poor are becoming poorer. While one country has enough money to spend $2,700,000 on an atomic submarine, another country reports an increased sale of candles, indicating the low standards of living of its people. Indeed, if a procession of the poor and hungry of the world began at our front door and traveled the circumference of the earth, they would encircle it not five times but 25 times! Hunger is a greater threat to the peace of the world than the atomic bomb. The psychological law which seems' to be op- erating is that the world is now divided into two camps: those who lack everything and those who want everything. Among those who lack may be grouped 17 out of 21 of the poorest countries, which contain one-half of the world's population. Yet these poor countries have only nine per cent of the world's total income. On the other hand are the 19 richest countries in world, with 16 per cent of the world's popu- lation and 60 per cent of the world's income! People who HAVE are never satisfied with what they have--they WANT! And what they want is a false infinite--not money that will buy things, but money simply because it takes the place of God. There are many in the Western world who want money more than the starving want bread! From a spiritual point of view, no man ever loses his soul because he is rich, just as no man ever saves his soul because he is poor. In the parable of Luke, we read: "There was a certain rich man once . . . clothed in purple and lawn and feasted sumptuously every day. And there was a beggar called Lazarus, who lay at his gate covered with sores, wishing that he could be fed from the crumbs that fell from the rich man's table, but none was ready to give them to him; the very dogs came and licked his sores." The cups of both were filled to the brim--one with almost every good thing, the other with almost every earthly sorrow. The difference was that the poor man lacked that which was earthly, the rich man lacked that which was heavenly! It was in the power of the rich man to feed the hungry, cloth the naked, send the Gospel to other lands, but he did nothing with it. The great tragedy of becoming rich is that man is apt to make himself the center of existence; then wealth does not mean larger liberality in giving, but increased luxury in personal expenditures. The great value of wealth is that it enables one to create inter- cessors for his soul, who, like defense at- torneys, will plead for him on the day of judgment. We give you a chance to win such intercessors now--S5,600 is needed to build a chapel at Isiolo in Kenya. Help build this chapel, and many others like it throughout the missions, and you will be building up your own case in heaven! Thank you! GOD LOVE YOU to M.C. for $1 "I promised God a dollar i,f we won our homecoming game. We won, so here is my o[/ering to His nlissions." . . . to G.S. McC. /or $10 "Here are the contents of my mission bank/or the poor.".., to Mr. and Mrs. H.F.K. or $7.56 "'We would like to re-invest the enclosed dividend check in the most important business o all--the business of saving souls." Worldmission, a quarterly magazine of mis- sionary activities edited by Most Reverend Fulton J. Sheen, is the ideal gift for priests, nuns, seminarians or laymen. Send $5 for a one-year subscription to Worldmissions, 366 5th Ave., New York 1, N. Y. Cut out this column, p/n your sacrifice to it and mall it to Most Rev. Fulton I. Sheen, National Director of the Soeioty for the Propa- got;on of the Falth,  .th Avenue, New York 1, N.Y., or your Archdiocesan Director, Rev. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle 4. The Art Leisure Time n ending one of these columns two weeks ago I used the words, as they related to the increase of leisure time, "but this is another problem." We now explore the problem of leisure time, not whether we should get it or not, or whether or not it is a partial answer to the effects of auto- mation, but as we believe the time for dialectic has passed. The reality of a shorter work week is recognized by as di- verse entities as the Interna- tional Federation of Christian Trade Unions, who with Ameri- can unions favor the shorter work week, and the National Association of Manufacturers, who have gone on record as the protagonist. The intrinsic problem of of increased leisure time is that the time gained may be time lost. If this increased leisure time is wasted, not by my standards, or the labor union standards, or even mangement's stan- dards but by the standards of the natural law, then there has been little advantage to this time. As this column has stated, this must become one of the new responsibilities of the labor union. It is our contention that more leisure time as it tends to increase our vegetable growth rate is time better spent on the job. While it may provide a partial answer to the growing employment displacement of automation, it negates all such good by destroying t h e individual, thereby destroying society. A vegetable, for want of a The Church and The Worker .o By John J. Eckhan Seventh of a Series i more classical definition, is a man who spends his leisure time glued to the shimmering glow of the tube, whose sole intellectual attainment, artistic acheivement, and spiritual en- lightenment is reflected in his ability to open a can of beer. If an increase of leisure time is so used as to numb the senses, destroy the cap- acity to appreciate, and to turn the mind from creation, then the unions have performed a disservice in gaining those extra hours of free time for the worker. Does this infer that the unions must teach the worker to read and appreciate all of the great works, learn the road to the nearest art museum, or raise the best hybrid tea roses on the street? Not at all. This would be lowering the lid of their own standards on the bubbling intellectual pot of the worker. It is not the position of the Church or of the union to teach the worker what he must do with his leisure time, as it relates to specifics. What must be taught is that something must be done with the time that is in har- mony with the person as a complete human being. This does not mean activity, activity, activity. One of the finest f or m s of recreation (from re-creation, to re-create one's self) is to recline on the greensward and watch the white clouds roll by, and then for a change of pace, roll over and watch the grass grow. I would consider this much better than blanking out be- fore the tube. But again these are my standards and count as nothing. However contem- plation is one method of en- joying God's world. The problem could well swell to unworkable proportions. But an even greater threat of automation is the threat of misusing leisure time. Herein are the seeds of national ruination. I see the labor union, acting on the principles of Holy Mother Church as the logical place to begin the instruction of the worker. It would be a sin to say: "Here is leisure time, go out and do with it what you will." Global Deep Freeze Remains Tt Lroughout (Continued from Page 1) veillance might be even more embarrassing to Castro. Be- sides, it is more satisfying than on-site inspection. We should not be too hard on Khrushchev after his Cuban set back, because if he should be ousted as premier on ac- count of his failures, his suc- cessor might be even tougher to deal with than he is. That, of course, requires some imagination to believe. Five weeks after President Kennedy caused Khrushchev to back off by delivering a re- sounding challenge to the Sov- iet threat in Cuba, the situation appears to be about the same as it was before October 22. Temporary victory it certain- ly was and, the nation was electrified, but it takes more than the winning of a single battle to win a war, especially with the Soviets. We are gradually finding that out, even though we might not have realized it earlier. Now that Khrushchev has been let off .the hook without too much dam :e to his pres- tige (in fact, it was enhanced, thanks to Red clever propa- ganda), his minions have re- verted to the hard bargaining. As the negotiators again met in Geneva Monday to at- tempt to reach agreements on nuclear test ban and dis- armament, President Ken- nedy said: "Perhaps now, as we step back from danger, we can together make real progress in this vital field (disarmament)." Reasonable men would con- sider this a reasonable state- ment, for it is indeed a time when a just peace should be arranged, but the record shows that Soviet negotiators are not reasonable, nor just nor even honest. They are proving this once again. Enter Mikoyan The general assumption has been that the Soviets would be in a more conciliatory mood after their recent exper- ience because they would not want to risk another similar encounter. The reverse appears to be true. They expect Us to be more conciliatory, and their obdurate stance at Geneva during the past few days leaves no doubt that they wil| not retreat from their previous demands to have everything their own way, or no agree- ment. It was reported this week that they are continuing nu- clear testing every other day despite their promise that the tests would termi nate Novem- ber 20. Glossing over their apparent stupid and rash venture in Cuba, they are insisting that we now negotiate with Catro on his terms. After spending 24 days with Castro, Soviet D.puty Premier Anastas Mikoyan returned to the U.S. Monday to join his associates in the UN in try- ing to prevail upon U Thant to ' side with them in bringing pressure on U.S. negotiators to settle the Cuban matter, again on their terms. Mikoyan blandly reported that Castro was now willing to accept inspection of the island, provided "reciprocal" UN in- spection would also take place on the U.S. mainland, Puerto Rico and other areas of U.S. soil from whence an invasion of Cuba might be made. The audacity of this sugges- tion is beyond compare, partic- ularly since President Kennedy has not as yet said he would guarantee Cuba from invasion until Castro had accepted UN inspection to verify that all missiles had been removed and that bombers would all be taken out. At press time, Mikoyan is in Washington where he is con- ferring with President Ken- nedy and officers of the State Department. Castro Grows Mikoyan pharisaically poses the problem that Castro can- not be persuaded to permit UN inspection of his country. until the U.S. has concurred in his numerous demands which in brief add up to a complete vindication of his position and consolidation of his Communist regime pro- tected by the U.S. What is more irritating is the present proposal that Cu- ban, Soviet and U.S. negotia- tors meet together, thus equating the Kremlin stooge with the U.S. and recognizing him even though we have General Views On Dating By Rev. John L. Thomm, S.J. Associate , St. Louis University Your views on dating don't make sense. My cMssmates and I o/ten talk about your articles and we've ust about reached the conclusion that you'd like it i we never dated at all. Our parents read what you write, and this makes it very di/ficult or us. Don't you know that dating is here to stay? What's so wrong with it? ne of the marks of maturity is the ability to grasp distinctions. If you and your classmates will re- read what I have written about dating, I think you will discover that I distinguish between various types of dating and dating practice, pointing out that some are useful, some may be dangerous, and some are downright immoral. To lend some perspective to what I'm going to say, I shall begin with an historical note. Current dating patterns are neither universal nor in- evitable. Dating, especially teen-age dating, is confined chiefly to America and is of re- latively recent origin. Prior to World War I, dating activities were generally associated only with courthip, or the proximate occasion of selecting a marriage partner. As entertainment and social life became less family-centered during the period between the world wars, the unmarried began to develop their o w n pattern of recreation outside the FATHER THOMAS home, and this increasingly took the form of dating aimed chiefly at entertainment and companionship rather than mate selection. Following World War II, this new form of dating gained rapid acceptance among ever younger age groups, so that it is now the major means of participating in social life from grade school to marriage. Considered in terms of our present social structure, dating may serve several useful purposes: companionship, entertain. merit participation in group activities, and "social" education, inasmuch as it offers young people the opportunity to as- sociate on a familiar social basis with a gradually expanding circle of acquaintances. In this sense early dating may be thought of as a series of trial runs or test flights preparatory to full, adult participation in social life. Patterns Open To Criticism ow, although dating could serve such highly useful purposes, I think you will have to agree that several features of the current pattern are open to serious criticism. In the first place, dating is initiated too early in the lives of most young people. It frequently begins in grade school, being accepted and often encouraged by shallow-minded parents and teachers, so that by the time boys and girls are sopho- mores in high school, they are expected to be dating rather consistently. * Second, young people date too frequently. Adult success and happiness in our complex, technically advanced, increasingly automated society requires long year of formal education and training, together with the development of a sense or responsi- bility, self-control and discipline. Dating is very attractive, yet youth's available time, energy, and scope of interest are neces- sarily limited, s'o that anything more than casual or random dating up through high school must hinder adequate development for modern life. Third, because alternate forms of seeking entertainment are no longer supplied, the pattern c  too early and too frequent dating inevitably leads to steady dating. Young people feel they must have dates if they are to share in social life, and since they normally lack self-assurance and proficiency in making friends, they find it safer and less bothersome to fix on one partner. The terms, steady dating, has several meanings. Among young people who have no thought of immediate marriage, it has come to include a variety of patterr, ranging from the convenient agreement that a given pair can safely rely on each other for dates, to the exclusive, affectionate, and intimate as- sociation of a couple which differs in no way from steady dating during courtship. This latter form of steady dating is psychologically and morally dangerous, for normal youngsters cannot engage in such dating activities without becoming emotionally and sexually involved. Disreqard of Pacts inally, an analysis of the modern dating system as here de- fined reveals an amaz'ng disregard of the known facts of life, of the fundamental needs of adolescence,, and of the obvious demands of Christian morality. We may assume that American youngsters are sexually normal. We must also acknowledge that a technically advanced society requires both boys and girls to undergo an ever in- creasing period of serious formal study and training before they are prepared to take their places in t:.e adult community. We do not need the learning of a skilled theologian to r cognize that the wilful exposure of youth to prolonged, relatively unsupervised, intimate cross-sex associations is morally evil: Yet premature and frequent dating, together with the practice of steady dating, clearly ignore all these facts and principles. I think, that if you and your classmates take a more severed diplomatic relations adequate view of present dating practices, considering them with his government, in terms of meaningful life-goals and Christian moral principles, What would be made to ap- you'll be less inclined to disagree with my position. pear as a three-cornered nego- I tiation if we accept the pro- posal, would actually become a CHRISI IS C-HRISTMAS ,-" two-to-one setto with the U.S. .' .......... "- on the defensive.  ............... :._ -_ Gifts that communicaie the -'::= It became known this week :'':*:' ................... inspiration and joy of the holy'season. ............... ::. that Castro's demand, with  . ........ ., ............................ ._=. .. :=:.=:::::!:::.::::!:,::::.! Moscow's blessing, was in the .......... . .............. ........ ....... hands of our State Department * .... ..,.o'iiji, for the past two weeks. It had i been given to it by U Thant who e x p e c t e d our answer  ...... . -, Thursday. At deadline, there " ............ " '''. was no report of our answer. -:,;:i;: One really must ask what is going on, particularly since the Soviet Union has refused to consider the appointment of U Thant for a five-year term as Secretary General until the Cuban question is settled. Furthermore, it should be noted that Mikoyan had high praise for Castro's regime, that he received a great bear hug from the Cuban dictator on his departure and that he conveyed Khrushchev's and Soviet Presi- dent Brezhnev's pledges for continued fraternal aid and support. From here all this doesn't add up to a Communist or a Soviet defeat in Cuba. The one bright spot is that even though we lifted the block- ade on Cuba, the Administra- tion's official position s t i 1 l seems to be a policy of isolat- ing Cuba economically and po- litically. A IOgAR|E$ CHAIM ]ACIL'] IY CI-, SICX CALL 'r HOLY WA'l'le TTLE$ AND FONTS MIrDALS CO'$TANT COMPANIOI R]LTGIO IY