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Catholic Northwest Progress
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November 29, 1963     Catholic Northwest Progress
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November 29, 1963
 

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John Eckha i The Whole Truth, Nothing But? / "POPE COUNCIL AND WORLD," by Robert Blair Kaiser, Macmillan, 266 pp., $4.95 VERY layman should have a prograr for the Coun- cil. You can't tell the good aracters from the bed char- /ters withou t a program. 'How fortunate then that Mr. 'Kaiser has provided us with just such a help. ! He lays it out .in shades of ' black and white, all couched . in that slick eastern style that has so aptly been termed Timeso." irst the bad ones. These are the ones, dead and alive, that the author believes must be headed off at the pass. The beloved Pope Plus XII refers to variously as 'authoritarian," and a 'mall town aristocrat." Mr. Kaiser blames him for what By JOHN J. ECKHART charging the citadel of "non. think." He is a scholar, he is profound, he is progres- s i v e, he is described in physical tei'ms of esthetic purity. All of which may be very true but all of Mr. Kaiser's defense mechanisms to the contrary, the f a t e of Holy Mother Church is not bound to the success or defeat of Cardinal Ben's programs in the Council. He does not represent a bul- wark of sanity against the "carping of the traditionalist. Mr. Kaiser is for altars in the center of the church, which all leading liturgists now reieet, he is against the uniform of the Swiss Guard, which is carping just a tiny bit. He is against the "meek laity," even though Christ gives us oar example, and he is for the entire fringe area of progressive retrogression. ment, believing that should be left to the governed. Nor is it an attack on Communism. The material is, instead, an ex- planation of the basic philoso- phy  of conservatism, a n d shows the areas in which it differs from liberalism. Willmoore Kendall is a man of wide learning and exper- ience. He knows his histor- ical background as well as the modern political issues. His style of writing is a little involved not b e c a u s e he writes in a pedantic manner, but that he is inclined to ramble, and this occasional- ly obscures his points. If the liberals would stop screaming "Bircher," and the conservatives stop screaming "Communist" at one another perhaps true dialoge could be achieved. This b o o k should help the Liberal to understand, and the conservative to articu- late.--Dorothy Eckhart Smith Friday, Nov. 29, 1%3 THE PROGRESSES Modern 'Dry Martyrs' 'The World Today" By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SHEEN OME--The other night, as we dined with about 18 bishops from behind the Iron Curtain, we asked seven of them who were near us at the table to add up the number of years they had spent in prison and in concentration camps because of their Faith. The total was 26 years! We then told them that they were "dry martyrs," explaining that a "wet martyr" was one who shed blood for his Faith while a dry martyr was one who died a thousand times through suffering. They answered: "We are all potential wet martyrs," adding that they had either .'just gotten out of prison or were getting ready to be sent back. We then told them that Christ has various kinds of presence in the world: one is in the Church, another is in the Eucharist, another in the poor (Leon Bley, unable to receive Communion one day, asked that a poor person be brought into his sick room), and the other presence of Christ is in the suffering of His bishops, priests and people who are "witness- ing to Christ" by their lives. Millions and millions of our faithful Catholics live in a state preparatory for martyrdom. Youth in many countries think not so much of living but of dying for their Faith. Won't you identify yourselves with these holy men and women by little acts of self-denial, so that you may at least have pin-pricks to set alongside their scars? One of the great advan- tages of fasting is that by doing without some- thing you want, you become one with those who are in need. St. Paul says that if one member suffers, for example the hand, the whole body suffers with it. So it is in the Church; the poor and the suffering are part of our body. If you denied yourself just one cigarette a day, you could send the Holy Father, through his Society for the Propagation of the Faith, about $6 a year, or $5.73 more than the average per capita contribution of United States Catholics to the Vicar of Christ for the missions and mission- aries of the world. May the Holy Spirit inspire you to love those who love unto death! GOD LOVE YOU tO ].A.H. /or $1 "I am 12 years old and am sending you four weeks allowance, hoping it will help a little." . . to R.R.K. for $10 "'In thanksgiving for the short wait in the expectant-fathers" room for number six to arrive." . . . to Mr. and Mrs. F.E.O. Jr. for $100 "We could have paid a few store bills with this, but the stores will be paid in time anyway. The poor and suffering of the missions, on the other hand, have been way overdue/or a "payment' ]rom U$ff O Why not give a Worldmissien Rosary blessed by Bishop Sheen for Christmas this year? Each decade is a different color, representing the five continents where missionaries are laboring to bring Christ to the pagans. Send your  request and an offering of $2 to The Society for the Propagation of the Faith, 366 5th Ave., New York, N. Y. 19001. Cut out this eoinmn, pin your sacrifices to it and mail it to Most Ray. Fulton J. Sheen, National Director of the Society for the Propa- gation of the Faith, 365 - 5th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001, or your Archdiocesan Director, Ray. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Ave., Seattle 98104. The worm I live in is so strange today, And the rain can't be felt through my tears. "Like the walking dead, l move through the streets Full of people, steeped in sadness and fears. This is my country, so brave and so true Through many a courageous fight, Once shieing in glory, the light now is dimmed By the unwdcome arms of death's night. This night is our sorrow; our hearts bleak with pain No wonder if we'll see a new dawn. Yes, tomorrow's sunshine will come . . . but today It's so dark . ,, and our President is gone. Catholic U Pioneers Aeronautics By J. J. Gilbert A/ASHINGTON--Sev- V eral years before the Wright brothers made m Dorothy Marie MacKay LIFETIME GIFT , PRAYER BOOK AN{) MISSAL A CHOICE OF FINE BINDINGS: $3.$0-$4.7S-$6.S0.$10.00-$12.S0 Bridal Edition in White Leather: $15  m#* hr acm d men dmh The EOWARD O'IOOL[ CO., bc. he calls the drydocking of the Bark of Peter. Another to be watched and thwarted at every turn else we all end in perdition, is Cardinal Ottaviani. Mr. Kaiser squeezes up all of his re- ,weed journalistic flash to dicule and smear the head of the Holy Office. When Cardinal Ottaviani at- tacks something, the attack is "virulent." Hoe Boy! All that is "retrogressive," and all that is to be discarded rests in the person and personality of Car- dines Ottaviani. Mr. Kaiser mpietes his satin hatchet by telling several preco- cmus tiny jokes about the Car- dinal. Mr. Kaiser Is happiest when calling them nasty little names. He uses "siege mentality," the "retrogressive c I an,' ' and "fossilized" enough that in an a u t h o r of less magnificent talent it would be a downright With Mr. Kaiser it is simple. If he is against you, you have had it. You are devoid of saving graces of any ilk. The good guys are headed up by good guy Cardinal Ben. He is the white knight In this he represents fewer and fewer devotees, and as a representative of a diminish- ing clan, his book represents less and less importance --J.J.E. "THE CONSERVATIVE AF" FIRMATIVE," by Willmoore Kendall, Regenry, $5.95. N A recent TV program a famous professor blandly and positively stated that the college youth of this country is conservative be. cause it has a deep yearning for security. Famous professors should not deal in cliches, especially erroneous ones. It destroys the image. In American politics there are "left w i n g and right wing" members in both par. ties, and the resultant can- fusion leaves the electorate with nothing much to vote for but a personality. It is high time for a little defin- ing to be done. As a begin. ni n g, the good professor should learn what a con- servative is. The book beats the dram for no particular form of govern. Feature Films On Television Belllagham KING-TV (NBC) Channel 5 KVS-TV Channel 12  KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 ' Tacoma " Seattle ICI'NT-TV (CBS) Channel II KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 KTVW-T, Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CISSIFITION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-]--Moraily Unobjectionable for General Patrccage; A-II--Merdly Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-IlI--Mora]y Unobjectionable for Adults: B--Moraily Objectionable in ,Part for All; C-Condemned; SC--Separate Classification; N1--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listd below were those given the original movies. Most films before being shown on tele- vision are edited to con/or# to the television code and to the individual station's tine schedule. For this reason, objectionable parts'contained in the origind plot may be deleted in the television vesion and thus the original Lrgion rating may not be enirely correct.) SATURDAY, IOVEMBER 30 1:$0 p.m.KOMO.TVThe Llfflest Rebel .............................. A-I 2:30 p.m,--KING-TV--aeast from 2Q000 Fathoms ....................... A-I 4:00 p.m.KIRO-TVCosmlc Man ! ...................................... A-I 6:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--,GIrl Rush . ..................................... A-II 9:00 p.m.--KING-TV-..Count Your esslng$ ........................... A-Ill 10:00 p.m.--KTNT-TVBefore Hang .................................... a 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TVGolden Mask .................................... A-II 11:00 P.m.--KIRO-TV--Strange Ladyn Town ............................ A-II 11:05 p.m.--KING-TV--Idlot's Dellgh ....................................... e 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TVDarby's Raers ................................ A-II I 12:45 a.m.--KVOS-TVThe Miami ,,q)ry .................................. A-II SUNDAY)ECEMEER 1 11:30 a.m.--KVOS-TV--Ooctor at  ....................................... e 11:30 a.m.--KIRO-TV--Thls Side ofhe Law .............................. A-II 2:00 p.m.--KING-TV--Strangers o[a Train ............................... B 4:30 p.m.--KTNT-TVThe VoodoTlger .................................... B 4:30 P.m.KOMO-TV--Brlght Ey ....................................... NR 4:30 P.m.--KTVW-TVCondemned Women ................................ NR 6:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--The Tarta[ Invasion .............................. NR 7:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--A Tree G0ws In Brooklyn ...................... A-IS 12:30 a.m.KVOS-TV--The Steel Cage .................................. A-II MeND/Y, DECEMBER 2 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TV--The Seot of Convict Lake ..................... ..B 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--FootH ght Sereoade ................................ A-II 3:30 p.m.KING-TVEI Paso .............................................. B S:30 p.m.KVOS-TV---Adventu In Baltimore ........................... A-I 7:00 P.m.KIRO-TVThls Gtf, for Hire ................................. A-II 7:30 P.m.KING-TVHouse 1 Numbers .................................. B 10:30 P.m.--KTNT-TVelOCK ;n0el ....................................... A-I! 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TVThe Ed of the Affair ........................... A-II 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TVBockfrom the Dead .............................. e 1:00 a.m.--KTVW.TV---Chec!rlESDAy,and DOubleDECEMBERCheck  ........................ NR 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TV--Thuderlflg Jets ................................... A-1 2:00 P.m.KTNT.TVBla6 Angel ...................................... A-II 3:30 p.m.KING-TV-;TheEgg and I (Port t) .......................... A-II S:30 p.m.KVOS-TVHurlcane Island ...................... . ............ A-I 10:30 p.m.--KTNT.TV--'sut My Big Mouth ............................... A-II 11:00 p.m.KVOS .T'-,-T'Ipoll .............................................. A-II 11:30p.m,KOMO--rhe Quiet Gun ......... ; .......................... e 1:00 a.m.--KTVW.V--FIght for Your Lady ............................. A-II WEDNESDAY, nECEMBER 4 9:30 a.m.KOMCTVThe Raid ........................................... A-I 2:00 p.m.--KTNll'VShut My Big Mouth .............................. A-II 3:30 p.m.--KINV--The Egg and I (Part II) ......................... A-II 5:30 p.m.KVOTV--Flight Angels ..................................... A-H 7:00 p.m.--KTV-TV--Mr, and Mre. Smith ......... , ..................... B 10:30 p.m.--KTIfTV--Boomerang ........................................ A-II 11:00 p.m.KVS.TVThe Big Sky .......................... A-II 11:30 p.m.--KCtp-TV--Shleld for Murder ........ ........... ".',: ........ B 1:0e a.m.--K'fW-TV--Bunker Bean .............................. ".'.':'.'.'.'A-I TNURSDAY, DECEMBER $ 9:30 a.m.--Ko.'rV--Cause for Alarm ................................. A-II 2:00 p.m.--gNT-TV--Boomerang ..... , ................................... A-I I 3:30 p.m.--G.TV.--Crulslng DOwn the River ......................... A-I S:30 p.m.--VOS-'rV--Allegheny Uprising ..................... : ........... A-I 7:00 p.m.--rNT-TV--Home In Indiana .................................. A-II 10:30 p.m.-TNT-TV--The Undying Monster ............................ A-II 11:30 p.m.--OS.TV..-Experlment Perilous ............................... A-II 11:30 p.m.-(OMO-TV--Sea Wife .......................................... A-II 1:00 o.m.KTVW-TV--StrIctly Dynamite ................................. NR FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 9:30 a.m,KOMO-TVRIders to the Stars .............................. A-I 2:00 p.rmKTNT-TVPepper .............................................. A-I 3:30 p.n.-KING-TV--Father Is a Bachelor .............................. A-II 5:30 p.r-KVOS.TV--Dangerously They Live .......................... A-I 7:00 p.t--KTVW-TV--Story of Vernon and Irene Castle ................ NR 10:30 pt-KTNT-TV.-Canyon Passage ................................... A-I! 11:00 p,.KVOS.TVPossage West ..................................... A-II 11:30 .lrKOMO-TV--Slackboard Jungle .................................. B 1:00 d.Z-KTVW-TV--Behlnd the Rising Sun ................... e ......... O R.vlo.. Spom.00. Catholic Gifts & Church oods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasant shopplng atmosphere with a select variety of rellglous gifts. 607 Un;on St., Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 / / In Death, Nation Feels Family Unity, By George N. Kramer, Ph.D. The President is dead. Long live the President. The saying, as applied to the English monarchs, means of course that the per- son vested with the office of President has expired but that the office of the presidency cam tinues to be filled by a succes- sor. Under the provisions of our Constitution, the Vice-President as soon as practicable takes the oath of President. This occurred w i t h i n two hours of President Kennedy's d e a t h when Lyndon Baines Johnson was sworn. When President Johnson ar- rived in Washington several hours later, he plunged directly into affairs of state, but not be- fore he delivered what may well be the shortest inaugural ad- dress ever made. Or was it a pledge and a prayer? As mil- lions of television v i e w e r s looked on, he said: "This is a sad time for all people. We have suffered a loss that cannot be weighed. For me, it is a deep personal tragedy. I know that the world shares the sorrow that Mrs. Kennedy and her family bear. I will do my best. That is all I can do. I ask your help -- and God's." Then he asked for and re- ceived from Congressional lead- ers of both parties their united support. At 55, this native Texan has been known in political circles for more than a quarter con- tury. Born in a three-room farm cottage near Stonewall, Texas, Aug. 27, 1908, he early became interested in politics, as both his father and his grandfather had served in the State legis- lature. After a brief stint of teaching school, he entered the political arena and in 1937 he was elect- ed to the House of Representa- tives. He continued in this office through re-elections until 1949, when he entered the U. S. Sen- ate. He was minority leader in that chamber during the 83rd Congress and majority leader during the 84th-86th Congresses. He was named running mate with John F. Kennedy in 1960 and since that time has presided over the Senate. He saw active duty during World War tI and is a com- mander in the Naval Reserves. Everyone who has known Lyndon Johnson agrees that he is a hard worker and ener- getic, although his talents as an executive leader are yet to be tested. If they measure up to his legislative leadership, there will never be a dull moment. Political Picture One cannot conclude without speculating somewhat on the immediate future. For all practical purposes, Congress may as well go home now, because there is little like- Lihoed that any new important measures will be enacted, and it is exceedingly doubtful that any of the pending bills except- ing those absolutely necessary will be brought to a vote. Furthermore, it would be no more than fair to the new Chief Executive that he be given opportunity to get his feet on the ground. As to the election year politi- cal picturel there can be little doubt that, all other things be- ing equal, Lyndon Johnson will make a strong bid for the Democratic nomination, even though he did not obtain it in 1960. Following past precedents, and so far as the new Presi- dent's cabinet is concerned and the choice of advisers, undoubt- edly a number of changes will be made by the time Congress reconvenes in January. Common Grief A riderless horse was led down Washington's Pennsyl- vania Avenue Monday. The sad- rile, with stirrups reversed, waB empty. The leader had fallen. Ahead, slowly rolled a horse- drawn caisson bearing the flag- draped casket containing the mortal remains of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy. It had lain in state in the rotunda of the Capitol where hundreds of thousands of saddened citi- zens viewed it. Behind, in solemn procession moved a throng of mourners, foremost being the brave widow with the President's brothers and then the dignitaries from every part of the world. And following the procession were hundreds of millions of awed people everywhere en- grossed before television and radio sets paying homage in spirit to the late president. Death, the great leveler, had brought to the nation a feeling of family unity in this common bereavement, without distinction of race or religion, political or economic beliefs, poverty or wealth. Here was the sharing of a common tragedy, a reflection on the meaning of life, as the viewers saw the procession wend its way into St. Matthew's Cathedral where the final earth- ly solace of religion was so in- cisely portrayed. Here was the sobering thought that complete separation of church from state becomes a monstrous delusion. The reality of life and death was further heightened by the scene in Arlington National Cemetery where the body .of President Kennedy was m-i terred amid the thousands of heroes who also had served their country and died for it. And as the mourners turned away to face the routine reali- ties of each day's life they would always remember the flickering flame at the foot of the grave to remind them that the light of the past becomes a beacon for the future. World Stunned The hation was chilled with grief Friday when the word was spread that President Kennedy has been assassinated.. The entire world stood aghast on learning that one of its best-known leaders had so unexpectedly been slain by a high-powered rifle from a dis- tance of more than 300 feet as he was riding along a downtown street in Dallas, Tax. Words flowed by the millions until the English vocabulary was nearly exhausted, yet they somehow failed to convey the deeper feelings of the nation. For several days there was scarcely any other news trans- mitted ,over our mass communi- cations. This was particularly true when the alleged assassin of the President was gunned down in the basement of a police sta- tion Sunday, amid some 200 lawmen and newsmen. "Bizarre," "fantastic," and "incredible" were words total- ly inadequate to describe the sequence of events. Confusion became the order of the day. There is little that anyone can add except despite the great tragedy that has cast gloom over Thanksgiving Day, we may still give thanks that chaos did not follow. Whom to Blame? Almost immediately a f t e r news of the assassination had been broadcast, hysteria took the form of accusations directed against unidentified "rightists" and "hatemongers" as being responsible for the foul deed. This is the line Moscow spokesmen began to propa- gate, a line they have not yet discontinued. As a matter of fact, this theme has developed into an asserted "plot" since the slay- ing of the asserted assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, who was being held by authorities for grand jury indictment and later trial. What Moscow has not told its people is that Oswald was a Communist, a leader in the Fair Play to Cuba Committee and a life-long troublemaker. Law enforcement agents said they had sufficient evidence against the accused to convict him, despite Oswald's repeated denials that he had anything to do with President Kennedy's death. President Lyndon Johnson has directed the Justice Depart- ment and the FBI "to conduct a prompt and thorough investi- gation of all the circumstances surrounding the brutal assas- sination of President Kennedy and the murder of his alleged assassin." Top-level Congressional in- quiry, "above any suggestion of partisanship" will also be made. The findings will be disclosed to the public, and until that time the prudent and reasonable demeanor would seem to be one of restraint by refraining from making further unfounded accusations. Evaluation It is much, much too early to rank our late Chief Executive among his predecessors, and ac- tually it is of small conse- quence, as each held office at different times and confronted different problems. We could no better answer the question than by referring to President Kennedy's inaugu- ral address in which he re- ferred to "historythe final judge of our deeds." Although many may have dis. agreed with one or other of his policies or actions, rare was the individual who did not concede that John F. Kennedy was a man dedicated to peace and the welfare of his country as he saw it. If dedication to ideals is the virtue universally acknowledged by mankind, then President Kennedy will indeed rank high among the Presidents of the U.S. Footnotes in Life Of Late President President J o h n Fitz- gerald Kennedy's career and its tragic conclusion contain many notes and footnotes for the histor- ians: The 35th President of the U.S., he was the first Catholic elected to that office. He was the youngest elected President. He was the eighth to die in office. He was the fourth to be as- sassinated. He was the second to be succeeded by a Vice President Johnson. His death continued a coin- cidence that Presidents elected at 20-year intervals since 1840 have died in office: Harrison, Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, Harding, Roosevelt and now His career exemplified the family loyalty that is con- sidered a strong character- istic of Irish-Americans. His family is notable both for high honors and sudden grief. The Kennedy record lists an Ambassador, Con- gressman, Senators, Attorney General and President, but also two persons killed in plane crashes, a disabling stroke, an infant death, an assassination, While he did not attend a Catholic college, he received honorary degrees from several. His successor, President John- son, attended a Catholic institu- tion, Georgetown University Law School, in 1935. His first speech as President before a Catholic school audi- ence was at Boston College's 100th anniversary convocation, Kennedy. April, 1963. He was the first President His final speech before a from the Irish immigrant Catholic group was at the group that came to the U.S. in National CYO Federation con- the 19th century, and the first vention in New York a week to visit in Ireland before he was shot Visit Rome, t'm the Lourdes, Fal a, Holy Land in 1964! This year, join an American Express pilgrimage to Europe. Travel with congenial companiom to Rome, where an audience with the Holy Father has been re- quested through the North American College. A spir- itualdirector leads your group to Rome, Lourdes, Fatima, the Holy Land itself. A multiLingual courier escorts you through France, Italy, Germany, Portugal, Spain. Choose travel by C-'unard liner or TWA jet, departures March through September, Contact your travel agent or: American Express Travel Agency 1223 Fourth Ave., Seattle, Wash. 98101 (MA. 3-5542) theix first successful air- plane flight, the Cath- olic University of America here had an aeronautical laboratory. It was the first in any school in the world. The university, which is ob- serving its 75th anniversary, just recently established a Division of Space Sciences and Applied Physics in its school of Engineering and Architecture. Orville Wright flew an air- plane'near Kitty Hawk, N.C., December 17, 190. Aerody- namic research began at the Catholic University in August, 1895. The C.U. research in this field was begun by A. F. Zahm, then a physics instructor but later in charge of mechanics. Working for his doctorate, which he received from Johns Hopkins University in 1898, Zahm established the air resist- once to spheres moving at speeds up to 1,0O0 feet a second. He did his work in McMahon Hall in the center of the univer- sity campus, shooting spheres from a specially designed can- non. They passed through a dark room, breaking thin rib- bons of Light enroute. Mirrors and cameras measured the velocity and deceleration, thus establishing the resistance. America's first wind tunnel laboratory for aeronautic re- search was built on the C.U. campus in the winter of 1901. This is how the wind tunnel came into being:. Hugo Mattul- lath of New York was seeking a patent on "a large twin-hull seaplane." An examiner in the U.S. Patent Office wrote: "There is a ruling of the Patent Office which classes with per- petual-motion machines all de- vices for navigating the air without the aid of bouyant gas. A patent can be granted only when a working model is ex- hibited." Backers of Mattullath's in- vention supplied fan& to build the C.U. Aeronautical Labera, tory, to demonstrate the tech- . nical feasibility and practica- bility of Mattullath's airplane. Unfortunately, Mattullath died in December, 1002, and the seaplane studies endedt Aero- dynamic research continued at C.U., however, u n d e r Zakm. While the early aeronad:ies program at C.U. stemmed "'from the enthusiasm of a group of men convinced of the practicability of aviation," the present program at the school "stems from a desire to parti- cipato in the national program of space exploration." SATURDAY NOVEMBER 30 8 p.m., Special, KOMO-TV, Channel 4. "Six People--Ten Legs," Is the story of a crippled boy and the help he receives from his classmates. Pro- duced by the Good Shepherd Move- ment, founded by nev. James F. Hyatt,, M.M., of Seafl!e. produced In Jopan. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1 p.m., Challenge, KOMO-TV, Channel 4. The Rev. William Treaty, Rabbi Raphael Levlne and Dr. Lynn Corson will dtscuss "New Horizons In Re. Ilglon." PUIKISHERS 19 INUB( IN.AE, IIErW YOI , IL  4"++ Drop in and browse through our large variety of Christ- mas Cards. You'll find your tastes reflected in our wide selection of traditional and contemporary cards. Don't let the times lip away as all of us usually try to do ... It can be quite a jolt to realize all of a sud- den that "Holy smokes"l We for- got to order our Christmas C00rds 0 Catholic Gifts &. Goods Inc. 609 Union Street MUtual 2.3929 s.crlp.flon T t The j Christmas Edition r Off The Press December 13 t ,' . Order Today! IFT CARD WILL BE SENT t The Progress 907 Terry Avenue MA. 2-8880