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November 15, 1963     Catholic Northwest Progress
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November 15, 1963
 

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O To Wonder, Does It EJOICE! The reader's patience is again re- warded with the appear- ance of a guest critic and we graciously double your pleas, ure, perhaps even double your fun, with this well conceived appraisal by Dr. John Baler. John Baler, Ph.D., is pro- fessing philosophy in that de- artment at the University of ashington. His academic credentials are of the highest order among those to whom aca- demic credentials are im- portant. But more than that, he is a worthy member not only of University of Washington in- tellectual circles, but must cer- Linly be reckoned as a quiet in the Catholic inteIlec- lal community. "THE CONCEPT OF MAT- TER," edited by Ernan Mc- Mullin (Notre Dame: Uni- )versity of Notre Dame Press, 1963), pp. xi, 624. $9.95. N SEPTEMBER 1961, a con- ference was held at Notre Dame in which some 30 scien- tists and philosophers of vari- ous persuasions met to discuss the "concept of matter" -- a rather problematic notion not only for h a v i n g apparently Opped out of scientific de- ptions and explanations but also for lacking a stable use in various philosophical systems. The papers presented there-- most of them at least partially revised--and a few fragments of the discussions that followed them have been published in a single but very large volume. AIthough the concept of atter is not in the forefront contemporary philosophi- cal diseussion in any school or tradition, the list of con- tributors is really quite dis- tinguished and the resulting articles contain many valu- able critieal discussions of past and present philosophies. What makes the project an one, however, is the By JOHN J. ECKHART prospect of a confrontation, on the one hand, of philosophers and scientists and, on the other, of various current philosophi- cal opinions. Unfortunately, while there is no doubt that the participants found the actual experience of dialogue quite stimulating, nei- ther the papers nor the dis- appointingly small fragments of the discussion manage to convey to the readers any sense of interchange or development of ideas. In a way, the "concept of matter" may have been an un- happy choice of subject matter. The very fact that it is not a clearly delimited topic makes room for the diversity of opin- ion; but at the same time, this vagueness seems to have hin- dered a lively critical exchange of views. More often than not, the various participants h a v e fastened on such different elements in the general prob- lem that the major thrusts of various positions pretty much by-pass one another. The beginnings of an interest- ing development are evident in the discussions following the papers of Professors Sellars and Hanson but even these are distressingly brief. The book is hardly suitable for an evening of light reading, but anyone with a relatively good background in philosophy or science should be able to follow the main lines of the various arguments. The major difficulty, of course, is the book's lack of unity--it reads very much like a bound volume of a periodical series--which makes it unsuit- able even for a text in univer- sity course. Still, many of the individual articles would make valuable auxiliary reading in many different areas. The editor has grouped the articles into five maior parts. The first two parts are mainly devoted to philoso- phies of the ancient and medieval periods but the dis- eussion of problems in inter- Feature Films On Television K TV:VOS -Bellingham KING-TV (NBC) Channel 3 Channel 12 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 ' Tacoma Seattle KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel 11 KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 KTVW-TV Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobjectionable for Patronage; A-ll--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-III--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults: B-Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C-Condemned; SC--Separate Classification; NR--No Rating Available. , (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films before being shown on tele- vision are edited to conform to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, objectionable parts contained in the original plot may be deleted in the television version and thus the original Legion rating may not be entirely correct.) SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 2i30 g.m.--KING-TV--Plunder in 1he Sun ............................... A-U 4:00 p.m.--KlaO-TV.-Them ................................................. A-I 6:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Footllght Varieties .................................. a 9:00 p.m_.--KING-TV--Untamed ............................................ NR 10:00 p.m.KING-TV--The Mummy's Tomb .................................. B 11:00 0,m,KIRO-TV--Spawn at the North ................................ B 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Crest ot the Wave ................................. A-I 11:20 p.m.KING-TVJump into Hell .................................... A-II t1:3.0 p.m.KOMO-TV--The Prince and the Showgirl ...................... B 12:45 p.m.--KVOS-TVThe Vanquished ..............................  ..... A-II 1:00 a.m.KTVM-TV SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 1:00 p.m.KVOS-TVA Kid Far Two Farlhlngs ......... : ............... A-II "2:30 p.m.--KING-TV--About Face ........................................ A-II 3:00 p.m.=-KIRO-TV--Rangers of Fortune ............................ ....A-I 4:30 p.m.KTNT-TVSong of india ....................................... Ad 4:30 p.m.KOMO-TV--Llttle Miss Broadway ............................. A-I ,4:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV -- aanlo ..... ", ...................................... A-I 6:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Anas Against the Cyclones ........................ NR 7:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--The Gene Krupa Story ........ * ..................... B 12:30 a.m.--KVOS-TVThe Purple Plain ................................. A-U MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10 9:30 p.m.--KOMO.TV--Return to Treasure Island ........................ A.II 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Holf Angel ......................................... A-II 3:30 p.m--KING-TV--So This is Love .................................... A-I 5:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--The 49th Man ..................................... A-I 7:00 p.m.--KING-TV--The Plainsmen (Part D. .......................... A-I 7:30 p,m.--KING-TV--The Reluctant Debutante .......................... A-II 10:30 p.m.--KTNT-TVMuslc is Magic ................................... NR 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Dlstant Drums .................................... A-ll !1:30 p,m.--KVOS-TVGood Died Young ................................. A-II 1:00 a.m.KTW-TV--Riverboat Rhythm ................................. A-II TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19 9:30 p.m.KOMO-TV--RIde a Violenl Mile ............................... A-II 2:00 p.m.KTNT-TVMusic Is Magic .................................... NR 3:30 p.m,--KiNG.TV---Goodhye My Fancy (Part I) ..................... A-H $:30 g.m;--KVOS-TV--Battle Stations ...... ............................... A-1 10:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Star for a Night ................................... A-1 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Carbine Williams ................. ... .............. A-II 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV---God Is My Partner ............................... A-I 1:00 a.m.--KTVW-TV--aorn to Love .......... , ............................ NR WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TV--Lure of the Swamp .............................. A-II 2:00 .m.--KTNT-TVStar for a Night .................................. A-I 3:30 ).m.--KING-TVoodbye My Fancy (Part lit .................... A-II 3:30 ).m.--KVOS-TV--HoIIIday arand .................................... A-II 7:00 ).m.--KTVW-TVWoman's Secret .................................. A-II 10:30 ).m.--KTNT-TV--Your Uncle udley , ............................... A-I 11:00 ).m.KVO$-TV--Mogambo ........ ..................................... B 11:30 ).m.--KOMO-TVPlease Believe Me ............................... A-II 1:00 a.m.KTVW-TV--Annapolis Salute .................................. A-1 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 31 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TV--He Walked by Night ............................. A-II 2:00 ).m.KTNT,TV--Your Uncle Dudley ................................ A-1 3:30 =.m.--KING-TV--Stage to Tucson .................................... A-I 5:30 ).m.KVOS-TVBannerline ............................ , ............. A-II 7:00 ).m.--KTNT-TV--The t.ast Angry Man ............................. A-i 10:30 =.m.--KTNT-TV20 Million Miles to Earth ......................... A-I 11:00 ).m.--KVOS-TV--Madame Savory .......... . .......................... A.li 11:30 ).rn;KOMO-TVThe Left-Handed Gun ........... .................... B 1,:00 a.m,--KTVM-TV--Mexlcan Spltflre's Blessed Event .. ............... A-II FRIDAY,. NOVEMBER 22 9:30 O.m.KOMO-TV--GunbeU . ........................................... A.I 2:00 p.mKTNT-TVIn Hollywo0d ...... ........ ......................... NR 3:30 p.m.KING.TVJamaica Run .. .................................... A.II 5:30 p.m..'KVOS-TV--King and Four Queens ............................. .a 7:00 p.m.--KTVW-TVAnnIe Oakley ...................................... A-i t0:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Thunderblrds ....................................... A-I 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TVDon't Go Near the Water ............................ a 11:30 p.m.KOMO-TVPinky ..... : ....................................... A-II 1:00 a.m.KVOS-TV--Siind Drop, Warsaw ................................ NR 1:00 a.m.KTVW-TVExporiment Perilous .............................. A-ll Thls Review is Sponsored by Catholic Gifts I Church Goods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasant'shopping atmosphere with a select variety of religious gifts. 607 Union SL, SeaffJe I MUtual 2-3929 John Eckh Matter? preting Aristotelian and Thomistie philosophies of na- ture would be a stimulating complement for the student (or teacher) who finds "cos- mology" to be cut and dried. Part three (from the 14th to the 17th century) has only three articles but they are of such uniformly high quality as to be of special interest in any study of the history of science. Although technical in nature, they are, in a sense, less prob- lematic than the other essays. To my mind, part four (on modern philosophies) was the weakest. The historical studies--nota- bly John Smith's presentation of Kant's doctrine on matter-- were informative; but the more original efforts to deal with the problem systematically were very uneven. The fifth and final part is di- rected at problems raised in the p h y s i c a 1 sciences and should be of interest to anyone who wishes to consider the im- pact of recent developments in science on issues in the phil- osophy of nature. -- JOHN BALER. "ETHICS IN BUSINESS," by Thomas M. Garrett, S.J., Sheed & Ward, 181 pp., $3.95. J F EVER a book were needed for an age, such a book as this is needed. If there is an area in need of strong, even agonizing examination, it is the soul of the American business- man. My main criticism of this book is simple enough. It is not strong enough. It does not strike out hard enough. It does not trumpet a call of revival. While these are things that it does not do, it would be well to relate what is done, as any- thing constructive propounded in the field of business ethics is worth consideration. Father Garrett has made a depth study of the problem. He has read widely about his topic as evinced by bibliographies and reading lists. But of more import, he has interviewed those directly concerned. His searchlight be ams across such items as expense aeeounts, advertising, sales- manship, and eommunity and individual responsibility. In these instances he indicates the vast grey areas of mor- ality thinking employed by the businessman, and in most eases the black and white morality truth that is applica- ble. Some of his advice is prac- tical and workable. A good measure of honesty in business is the maxim, "would I want this act disclosed to the public, the government, or my su- periors?". In analyzing the mind of the honest-in-his-social-fashion busi- nessman, the author has cor- rectly, I believe, shown how vast forces of society, business, mass media, and even our tra- ditional forces for morality, have moulded the creature that we are. His stYle is lucid, slightly equivocal in spots, but all to- The Bishop in Khaki By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SHEEN [ OME--The other morning, before the 0  daily Mass for the,Council began, I met a bishop whom I did not immedi- ately recognize. For he was dressed in purple, and the last time I had seen him in the "bush," he had been dressed in torn khaki--the only practical outfit for his primitive mission diocese. This bishop, and hundreds of others, remind the rest of us what bishops are for, namely, the service of the people. In the missions they are not administrators--there is hardly any- thing to administrate; they are shepherds With their sheep, servants with their masters--the poor. The same is true of many bishops here from persecuted countries. They seem to be girded with a towel, as was Our Lord the night of the Last Supper when He washed the feet of His Apostles. In other words, they are what are called in Greek, DaLLaS--slaves of the faithful and of all mankind. It is in this spirit that the Holy Father calls Himself: "the serv- ant of the servants of God." It is the Will of God that we be beggars in the United States for these brother bishops, who are not judges but servants of the people. If you could come to the council and meet these hund- reds of men who, in poverty, minister to the poor, how you too would yearn to be their serv- ants! They truly live the words St. Augustine so often repeated to his people! "I am a bishop for you, I am a Christian with you." I intercede for these poor bishops of the world, who have to trust more in God because they lack coins to remind them, "In God We Trust." Absent from you in body, I am never- theless present among you in spirit, begging a remembrance in sacrifice and prayers for these holy men who keep before our eyes the ideal of service rooted in Our Lord, whom St. Peter called 'the Bishop of our souls." It is going to be a different world after this Council. You can help bring it into being by helping those who are most like Christ in His Poverty, His Crucifixion and His emptying' of glory to stand among men as those who "minister and are not ministered unto." In your will, in your daily self-denial, in your bearing witness to Our Lo/d in your office and work, make your- self saintly by serving first the saintly. e GOD LOVE YOU to E.G. and A.C. for $5 "We are 'strolling troubadors.' We offer our first tip for the missions. You'll be hearing from us soon again." . . . to Mrs. S.F.L. for $10 "I offered my daughter, a mother of six, this money. She asked me to send it to the missions instead. I feel so proud to think she thinks of others first," . . . to K.C. for $25 "I have been hungry but have been able to buy food. This is for those who do not have the money to buy food." We are not only asking for your sacrifices, but for your prayers. Send your request and an offering of $2 for the Worldmission Rosary, and we will send you these multicolored beads blessed by Bishop Sheen. Each time you say the Worldmission Rosary remember to put aside a daily sacrifice for the Holy Father. Cut out this column, pin your sacrifices to ft and mail it to Most Ray. Fulton J. Sheen, National Director of the Society for the Propa- gation of the Faith, 366 - 5th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001, or your Archdiocesan Director, Rev. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Ave., Seattle 98104. Where Is Moscow's Spirit? (Continued from Page 1) stopping their country's mill- Wheat Deal Closed toasts he proposed to, down- tary convoys. The U;S. executives were grade and insult them. "Your side caused the frie- kept informed by Khrushchev tion," he charged. "Evidently on the progress of the negotia- At least, our Ambassador it must be a test of nerves on tions for sale of U.S. surplus Fred D. Kohler reportedly took your part. When you de- wheat, to the Soviet Union. Khrushchev to task by asking: eided to test our nerves, we "Where is the spirit of decided to put our armored Upon their arrival they Moscow? I don't hear any of cars across the autobahn to were told that he had in- it. I haven't heard any toasts test your nerves and see if structed his negotiators to I eould drink to." you would start shooting or call off the deal if the U.S. There were no reports that not." traders insisted on discrimin- the businessmen resisted the Khrushchev also halted the atory terms. They had to blandishments of Khrushchev executives during a three-hour agree to the Soviet terms, or else we could eat our own during the three days they session when some blunt ques- wheat. spent in Moscow, and one won- tions which he didn't care to ders if this trip was really answer were ask'ed. For ex- This probably did it. The fol- necessary, ample, when queried about the lowing day, Khrushchev broke Of course, Khrushchev pop- Berlin Wall, he snapped: "If the joyful news that the deal pad the cork out of the bottle you start throwing hedgehogs had been satisfactorily con- of enticing, free-flowing trade, under me, I shall throw two cluded He informed the visit- The junket for the 20 heads porcupines under you." ing Americans that "The Amer- of major U.S. enterprises had The executives threw no icans are apparently seeing been arranged by Time, the more hedgehogs, reason," by agreeing to the weekly news magazine. Khrushchev refuscJ to be shipping issue as the Soviets Reasons for the trip at this drawn into a discussion of the wanted it. particular time were not given alleged rift between the Soviet This report was correct, be- nor are they readily discern- Union and Red China. cause after three weeks of ne- ible inasmuch as it was at- "I don't think your nose gotiating between U.S. traders ranged for the week of official would be quite in plaee in and the Moscow delegation, observance in Moscow of the such e discussign," he snort- agreement was reached Friday Bolshevik Revolution, immedi- ed. "it is one that eoneerus on a $250 million sale of wheat ately following several Soviet only ourselves and China." to the Soviet Union and its provocations on the Berlin He did add, however, that satellites. .... autobahn. "the Chinese and ourselves The formula under which have the same future," and the deal was closed, as re- Khrushchev not only blatantly that eventually there will again ported in the news, is not boasted of what he said was a be agreement between them. entirely dear. Apparently it U.S. back-down, but brazenly On the other hand, he assert- calls for at least 56 per cent lied to the Americans about ed that the Soviet Union would ofeach transaction to be ear- the autobahn confrontation in defend Cuba at all costs" and ried in U.S. vessels, if avail- he warned the U.S. to be care- able, at rates within guide- gi Of ful what it did against Cuba. lines fixed by the Commerce Le on is thinly-veiled threat that the Department. Soviets would attack U.S. allies These guidelines are said to D in Europe if we laid hand on work out at $18 a ton from the ecency Cuba apparently went unchal- Gulf of Mexico ports to Odessa First-Run Movies lenged, on the Black Sea and $16 a ton Finally, while he admitted to Leningrad on the Baltic, Showing In Seattle he was not "physically cape- whereas the going rate for A-2--Mary Mary. ble" of burying capitalism, transporting U.S. surplus grain A-4---Under the Yum Yum Tree. the capitalists would do the B--Shock Corridor. has been from $20 to $25 a ton. Other Movies job for him, he said. Nothing has been said about At the same time, he was how many U.S. ships will be CurrentJy Showing planting the idea of uncon. "available" at this reduced A-1--Tammy and the Doctor, How the trolled trade relations, figure. If they are not thus West Was Won, Rock-A-Bye Baby. Apparently the top-flight U.S. available, the 50 per cent ship- A-2--TheArabla, HauntedDays of WInePalaCe'andLawrenCeRoses, Yel-f executives read nothing into ping preference will be waived. low Canary, Paranoiac. these statements, either be- A-3--1n the French Style, The Caretak- There is nothing definite to ers, Spartacus, Beach Party, Heov- cause they didn't understand indicate the actual selling ens above, West Side Story, Don't Give what Khrushchev was saying price per bushel of the Up the Ship, Breakfast At Tiffany's, or else they thought he was All In A Night's Work, Hud. wheat. A-4Mondo Cane, Sky Above Mud Be- merely trying to amuse them. low. If so. thev do not understand B--Irma La Douce, The Gun Hawk, For gether an excellent magni- Love Or Money. Communism. tying glass for an increas- ingly soiled area. If he had gathered his forces of knowl- edge and used them to blast rather than suggest, his work would have had even greater importance. Not once does he suggest as a guide, would our lord Christ do this[--J.J.E. Sister says "Use the Maryknoll Missal" SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 7:30 a.m., Catholic Hour, KING-Radio,. 0090 kc.) Third talk by Rev. aede Griftiths, O.S.B., of Keralo, india. His topic today Is "The Bible, Liturgy and Ecu- menical Unity." 7:45 a.m., Hour o1 St. Francis, KXA. Radio (770 kc.) "Cost the First Stone," tells the story of man accused of a ilit and run killing, A mob gathers, determined to punish him for the death of o child. 9:15 e.m., Sacred Heart Program, KIRO-TV, Channel 7. The Very Rev. Robert I. Gannon, S.J., director of Jesuit Missions, New York, will speak on "Points of Agree- ment" among Catholics, Protestants and Jews. This Is the third In the series, "Toward Better Understanding." 6 p.m., Challenge, KOMO-TV, Channel 4. The Rev. William Treacy, Rabbi Ra- )heel Levine and Dr. Lynn Carson discuss *'Living with Frustration." They will define, analyte and suggest solu- tions to the two kinds of frustration (family and business). 7:1S p.m., Sacred Heart Program, KTVW-TV, Channel 13. The" Rev. Walter J. Burghardt, S.J., managing editor of Theological Studies at Woodstock College, Maryland, will speak on "The Secret of Christian Joy" the first in a series entitled "Theology and Human Living.' The only missal in the American idiom Available at your book- store in bindings from $3.50  to $.22.50. MARYKNOLL MISSALS P. J. KENEDY & SONS Publishers to the Holy Apostolic See Fr;day, Nov. 15, 1%3 THE PROGRESS--5 'Should We Tell Billy He's Adopted?' By REV. WALTER IMBIORSKI Femily Life Director, Archdiocese ef Chlaege Gusr Columnist for Rev. Joh L. Thomas, S.J. We adopted our Billy when he was only five weehs Old. He is now seven. Where n'e now live no one knows he is adopted. Should we tell him or uot, and if we do, how should we go about it? ERE is a question that generates heated discus- sions. Most fathers tend to consider it too little, while most mothers are inclined to weigh it too much. The adoptive mother is sensitive to possibilities and often worries about problems unlikely ever to happen. She will ponder how to make sure that the child wilt never feel different from a natural one, while the father may very well not see any differ- ence. Both of them are partially right and partially wrong. The adopted child is different from the natural one in the manner in which he reached the family. It is important that his parents face this fact squarely. The child who has been chosen need never feel deprived so long as he is surrounded by love. The fact that he was sought becomes an important basis for security. In ages past, formal adoption was an infrequent occurren 'e which was concealed in most cases. The importance of name, inheritance and caste was one factor. Another was the emphasis on heredity, breeding, and ',blood line." The suspicion that centered on any child who might be in the position of being adopted made the whole idea a very risky one. Added to this was the attitude that any couple who was childless (through no fault of their own) was being punished by God and must bear this cross silently in their enlpty homes. Today, with the advances in the fields of medicine and psychology, we know that neither of these attitudes is correct. It has ben shown over and over again that the effect of enviro- ment and love are far nmre determining than heredity in form- ing personality. We know that childlessness can be due to a" number of factors, none of which reflect on the morality or the adequacy of a man or woman. In this atmosphere the adoption of a child becomes a source of joy, not only for those most intimately affected, but for the community as well. No Need To Withhold Information IVEN this widespread acceptance of adoption, authorities are in agreement that there is no need today to withhold information about it from the child or the world. It is usually desirable that the child grow up knowing the story of his adoption and accepting it even as he accepts the love and attention he receives from his parents. In this way there is no danger of shocking discovery that at certain critical ages can cause disastrous loss of trust in the honesty of the parents whieh may affect the child's entire life negatively. I am inclined to wonder why you have never told him the facts before this and why it has become a consideration at this particular time. He has been "yours" since infancy. You know that the biological act of giving birth is not what makes a mother and a father. It is the numberless daily concerns and experiences that forge the bonds between parent and child. How should you tell him? However you both decide. There are a number of approaches. The most popular is simply telling him about the loneliness in your house before he came; how much you wanted a baby and yet God didn't seem to have one for you until you heard about the babies who needed a home as much as you needed a baby to love. Then the steps you went through (very little detail necessary here) so the people in charge would be sure you were the right kind of parents before you were allowed to go and choose him because he was everything you wanted! Depending On Circumstances ROM then on the emphasis must depend on other circum- stances of your life. Is he the only.child? If not, are the others natural or adopted children? (This can be inlportant because in households where there are both kinds, great care must be exercised not to overdo the "chosen" routine since the natural children may feel they have been forced upon you). Tell him about the day you brought him home; what he was wearing, what things you bought for him; how he acted, etc. At Billy's age any child loves to hear the details of his babyhood and to glean from your attitudes how precious he is to you. Be prepared for some questions--perhaps even about the "mother he was born to". State simply that she loved him so much tlmt she wanted to be sure he was very happy and so she was unselfish enough to make sure he had a 8ood home since she could not take care of him. There is no reason to divulge any circumstances or particulars of his natural parents, either now or later. A simple "I don't know" is sufficient. If you feel you need more help, I would suggest calling your diocesan adoption agency, or the one that placed Billy with you. I am confident that they can provide whatever information you need in addition to this brief outline. PROeUCED AND BOTTLED ly MoNr LA SALLS VINEYAROS. NAPA, CALIF. -- / Chateau a Sa//e is de/lcious. A LIGHT, GOLDEN, GENTLY-SWEET WINE FROM Primarily devoted to teaching, the Order helps to *" -support its educational mission on the West Coast with winemaking.