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September 24, 1965     Catholic Northwest Progress
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Greatest P:r00 essiona] Irish in i00ountry By JOHN J. ECKHART "THE WIND AT MY BACK", by Pat O&apos;Brien, Doubleday, 331 pp., $4.95. ELEBRITIES are prone to write autobiographies or hire them written. Being sure D of publication is one of the emoluments of fame. Pat O'Brien has been well known for many years, and furthermore, he has written his own book. He did not depend on digging up old scandals or dragging names through the mud in order to gain readers. He proves again what he has been showing all his life -- D that it is possible to be decent and still be interesting. As for the book itself, there is nothing outstanding about it. The style is easy and con- versational, iThere are many anecdotes about the stars he knows. Some of these are genuinely funny, and some make you realize that when a person is 'well known, all his utterances are considered great, whether they are or not. Much of the D time they are pretty mediocre. In case you hadn't noticed, Mr. O'Brien is Irish. He de- cries, the professional Irish- man, and makes it plain that he certainly is not one of those. Well, he is. He is the great- est professional Irishman in the country, an d what's wrong with that? To be proud of one's ancestry is no crime, D and if playing it up can be an asset, that is no crime, either. Mr. O'Brien has done so. and in the doing has helped divest the Irish image of the carica- ture of immigrant days, and bas given it dignity. Sure he is the rough-tough Irishman, but he also happens to be a gentle- man. Mr. O'Brien has led an inter- esting life. He did a great deal II entertaining the troops; has been presented to the pope; and has received many honors. He recounts all this in an un- assuming manner. He tells of his faith, which is very real, and he admits it freely while not shoving his sanctity at the reader. This will never be required reading in a literature course, but it is not a waste of time for all that. It is proof that a man can be religious, and decent, no matter what his profession, and fun, too. "THE CATHOLIC REFORMA-. TION," by Pierre Janelle, Bruce Publishing Co., 304 pp., $2.25 (paperback). account of the anarchy within the Church, and the efforts to combat it, before and after Trent. The r e f o r m movement touched all facets of the Church, affecting art, literature, and music, as well as monasteries and schools. 'Probably the most profound change was in the field of education. Here is the plaee where reform could work on the basic causes of corruption. The establishment of semin- aries did away with the ignor- ant clergy, and the saints like Peter Canisius worked for the broader education of the laity. It was this time, too that the great teaching and missionary Society of Jesus was formed. Pierre Janelle's scholarship OR REASONS of expediency, history is often presented to compares favorably with that of te student in sections. This Henri Daniel-Raps but he is not quite as easy to read. The book makes it a little easier to study, but often leaves some strange impressions. We can imagine Rome falling with a resounding crash, or the sudden clanking of machinery ushering in the Industrial Rev- olution. - We also tend to think of the Council of trent as a wall be- tween the decadent, crumbling church, and the vigorous, re- formed one. Neverthe- less, events don't move that way. The C o u n t e r-reformation was a quieter thing than the Protestant revolt, and is often neglected for the more drama- tie study. But it was of su- preme importance. The ferment was working be- fore Luther, and reform would have come without that particu- lar firebrand, but it probably would have been slower. By the same token, "the decrees of Trent were not immediately ef- fective everywhere. "The Catholic Reformation" of traveling during World War . by Pierre Janelle, is a detailed i Feature Films On Television Bellingham KING-TV (NBC) ..Channel 5 ' KVOS-TV ........ Channel 12 KIRO-TV (CBS) ..Channel 7 Tacoma Seattle KTNT-TV (CBS) .Channel II KOMO-TV (ABC)..Channel 4 KTVW-TV ....... Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobiectionable for General Patronage; A-2--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-3--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults; A-4---Morally Unobiectionable for Adults, with reservations; B--Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C--Condemned; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below ,ere those given the original movies. Most films before being shown on television are edited to conform to the television code and to the indi- vidual station's time schedule. For this reason, obiectionable parts contained in the original plot may be deleted in the television version and thus the original Legion rating may not be entirely correct.)' SATnRDAY, SEPTEMBER 2.5 S:00 ).m.mKTVW-TVGangway tar Tomorrow .......................... A-2 &:00 ).m.KTNT-TVThe Big Noise .................................... A-1 $:00 ).m.--KTVW-TV--Tlmber Stampede ................................ A-1 I;:30 hm.--KTNT-TV--The Lost Continent ................................ A.! 9:00 ),m.--KING-TVFire Over Africa .................................. A-2 9:00 ).m.--KVOS-TVOn The Town ..................................... A-2 10:30 ).m.KTNT-TVBrlde af 1he Gorilla .............................. A-2 11:00 ).m.--KVOS-TVRomance of Rosy Ridge .......................... A-1 11:05 ).m.--KING-TVPhantom of the Opera ............................. A-2 1: a.m.KVOS.TVlndlan Uprising ................................... A-t 1:1S o.m.--KiRO-TV--aeyond the Blue Horizon .......................... A-2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 9:00 a.m.KOMO-TV--Johnny Concho ................................... A.2 11:00 a.m.mKIRO-TVThe Jazz Singer .................................. A-1 11:00 a.m.--KVOS-TV--Dector In the House .............................. A.2 2:30 p.m.KOMO-TVHuk ............................................... A-1 3:30 p.m.KING-TVThe Brave Bulls .................................. A-2 4:30 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Jungie Manhunt .......... ........................ A.1 &:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--FIIght Cam ,aand .................................. A-1 7:00 P.m.--KTNT-TV--Caplaln Caution ................................... A-2 9:00 p.m.KOMO -TV--Anastasla ........................................... A:I 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TVThe Paths of Glory .............................. A.2 MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 9:00 a.m.KOMO-TV--SoJdler of Love .................................. NR 3:30 p.m.KING-TVThe Last Hurrah .................................. A-2 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-T'./--Wltness for the Prosecution ...................... A-2 11:20 p.m.--KIRO.TV--Strange Lady in Town ............................ A-2 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 9:00 a.m.--KOMO-TV---Chicken Every Sunday .......................... A-2 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Marry the Bess's Daughter ...................... A-1 5:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--At Gunpoint ...................................... A-1 10:00 p,m.--KTNT-TV--Genghls Khan ..................................... A-2 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TVHumnn Desire ...................................... B 11:20 p.m.--KI RO-TV--Callfarnia .... ........................................ A-2 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 9:00..m.--KOMO.TV--Run Silent, Run Deep ............................ A-1 3'.31; P.m.KING-TV--And Baby Makes Three ............................. B 5:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--The Little Savage ................................ A-1 10:00 P.m.--KTNT-TV--BeIle Starr .............. ......................... A.1 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--A Kiss Before Dying ............................... B THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 9:00 a.m.--KOMO-TV--Tropeze ............................................. B 3:30 p.m.--KING.TVShe's Working Her Way Through College .......... B 5;30 p.m.KVOS-TVSafarl ............................................... A-2 7:0B p.m.--KTNT-TV--Whlrlpool .................................. , ......... a 1;:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Kiss Them For Me .................................. B 10:00 P.m,--KTNT-TV--Raw Deal .......................................... A-2 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Grounds for Marriage .............................. B 12:31; a.m.d.KVOS.TV--The Big House ........................... q .......... B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1 9:00 a.m.--KOMO-TV--Darby's Rangers .................................. A-3 3:30 p.m.--KING.TV--She's Working Her Way Through Coltege .......... B 10:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--The Man ' Upstairs ................................ NR 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--By the Light of the Silvery Moon ................ A-1 11:20 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Master of Ballantre ............................... A.1 11:3$ p.m.--KIRO-TVToII Stranger ...................................... A-2 1:00 a.m.--KVOS-TV--The Law vs, Billy the Kid ......................... A-2 This Review Sponsored By The Preferred Wine For FISH The Christian Brothers, Nape, California iii quite rightly takes it for granted that the student is familiar with the events of the Protestant re- volt, and no time is wasted in reiterating them. This is a valuable book, giving weight and detail to the well known, but little studied other side of that particular coin. "THE SAINTS THROUGH THEIR HANDWRITING," by Girolamo Moretti, MacMillan, 269 pp., $6. HERE ARE STILL many people who regard graph- ology as a form of fortune tell- ing. This idea is completely false, for it is nothing more than a study of handwriting, and how it is formed by charac- ter. These traits show through, as well as an individuality that can make forgery stand out clearly to an expert. Father Mnretti is considered tops in the field, and he was shown samples of the hand- writing o{ 32 saints without knowing who they were. He analyzed e a e h, and eleariy proved that he knew what he was doing, for the portrait of each saint emerges exactly. Each section of the book shows a facsimile of the writing, gives the analysis, and then the character reconstruction. Then is given the biographical detail that proved the analysis. The book is, of course, more of a curiosity than anything else. It does show that the saints were human, with traits that could have been detrimen- tal had they not turned them to the service of God. There is one area where this book eauld be very useful. If you have a child in Catholic school, you know that he is very frequently looking up some saint or other. The handwriting angle could be a new way to handle an over- done assignment. -- Dorothy Eckhart Smith. ON RELIGIOUS LIBERTY One True Church Upheld VATICAN CITY(NC) peace, adequate protection of ships with God. There is no The ecumenical council's celebrated draft document on 'religious liberty will pro- claim the right of every man to worship according to the dic- tates of his own conscience, free from coercion "by any human power." It declares that this right, both for individuals and re- ligious groups, is based on the very dignity of human nature as known by reason and revela- tion. Therefore, civil societies and individuals have a corre- sponding obligation to respect and insure its exercise. An official summary of the document was released by the council press office as the de- bate began Sept. 15. It was the first item on the fourth ses- sion's busy agenda. As if to forestall conserva- tive objections, the schema hastened to assert that relig- ious liberty "does not imply that man has no religious obli- gations, or that he thereby be- comes independent of the au- thority of God," the summary states. "Such liberty gives no individual the right to equate truth and falsehood, nor does it mean he has no obligation to acquire correct ideas on re- ligion, or that he can decide on his own whether or not he will serve God, or in what religion or in what manner. The eoneept of religious lib- erty," it eontinues, "leaves intact the Catholic teaching on one true religion and one true Church nf Christ." With that said, the document goes on to state that on the basis of reason and revelation "in religious matters no one should be forced to act or be prevented from acting accord- ing to his conscience in private or in public, always within due limits." This right "must be recog- nized in the structure of civil society as a right which all men and all religious groups may legitimately claim. And the safeguard of this right is the responsibility of individual citizens and public authorities, "according to the mode proper to each," the summary states. E:plaining the meaning of the document when introducing the text to the council Fathers, Bishop Emile DeSmedt of Bruges, Belgium, insisted that ' although discussion . . . gives rise to many problems, only one is explicitly treated in our declaration--namely the object and foundation of the human and civil rights to liberty in religious matters, as indicated in present day society. Its foundation is that truth about the dignity of the human person on whom rests the en- tire social order," he said. "No restriction of this liberty can be admitted except because of serious demands of public order," said Bishop DeSmedt. The summary of the docu- ment points out that religious liberty has two restrictions: moral and juridical. When ex- ercising their freedom, in- dividuals are bound in the moral order to respect tbe rights of others. Juridically, the civil society is entitled to self-protection against abuses that occur under the guise of religious liberty. Public order "demands the proper safeguarding of a public public morality and the peace- ful and effective protection of equal rights for all citizens. This order is so necessary for sociely as a whole that any act in grave conflict with it must be repressed. "The practice of religion, ' the summary continues, "can- not be forcefully interfered with by public authority unless the practice disturbs the public peace, violates public morality or impinges on the rights of others." In outlining the theoretical foundations for religious liberty, the schema relies heavily on reason, although extensive sup- port is drawn from Scripture and tradition. It seems clear from the summary that the em- phasis is placed on the prac- tical need for liberty among men in modern society, rather than on the theological impli- cations. "Some Fathers wanted an ex- planation of the scriptural and theological background of our teaching on liberty," said Bish- op DeSmedt. "However, since we are addressing non-Chris- tians as well as Christians, it was thought best to begin with arguments that would be under- standable to non-Christians as well." The conscientious recogni- tion of the divine universal law imprinted on human na- ture isthe basis on which the schema builds its rational argument, the summary states. This reeognition and acknowledgment "is part of the dignity of the human per- son. Hence, in all his aetivity, every man is bound to follow his eonseienee faithfully in order to attain God, his End." "Therefore," says the sum- mary, "man has a'right and duty to seek out: religious truth in order to formulate sure judgments of conscience. Truth is to be sought in a human manner--that is, by free inquiry--and when it is found it must be accepted with per- sonal assent. Since man is by nature a social being, truth is to be sought out and found through teaching authority in- struction, communications with others and dialogue whereby men explain to others the truth they have discovered or think they have discovered in order to provide mutual assistance in their search for truth. "Therefore, we bare a solemn principle which, in re- ligious matters, forbids any- one to be forced to act against his conscience. "Our day and age, with its keener sense of personal and civil human dignity, requires that in human society no force be exerted by individuals, social groups or public authority in order to prevent men, whether iq private or public, from act- ing according to their con- sciences in matters of religion, naturally within their proper limits. This requirement is ab- solutely in keeping with reason and is worthy of men." It is wrong to recognize man's internal freedom without at the same time allowing him the free social practice of religion within proper bounds, the sum- mary of the document states. "Civil authority must be de- clared out of bounds if it in- terferes with man's relation- Little People like Andrew By MOST REV. FULTON J. SHEEN UCH attention is given to certain of the ApostlesPeter, Paul, John but little is given to Andrew. Andrew the Apostle never preached a sermon that has been recorded, yet he brought many people to Jesus. He brought his brother Peter to Jesus (John 1:42). He brought a boy with loaves and fishes to Jesus (John 6:8). He brought the Greeks to Jesus (John 12:22). Without Andrew there would have been no Rock of the Church, without Andrew no feeding of the hungry, with- out Andrew no lesson of the seed falling into the ground to yield rich fruit. O The Missions are helped by little people like Andrew. One little girl, aged five, sent her most precious possession--three marbles--for the Mis- sions. We telephoned to thank her. After all, how many others give their most precious possessions for the Missions? There are some women in the world who have diamonds that are no more precious to them than Suzy's marbles were to her. We have few rich friends, for the rich usu- ally give to those who already have millions. But we have millions of poor friends, Andrews closed a check for $1,500. With no fanfare, and no lack for anyone to notice, they have pro- vided the Holy Father with a sum that could educate a native priest, or treat 300 lepers with solfone for one year, or feed 1,500 people in the slums of Latin America. A Canadian wom- an anonymously sacrificed the $100 she had planned to spend on "an "unnecessary new winter coat." No one will notice that she is wearing the same coat for another year, but the poor of the world will certainly notice $100 worth of food and medieine. Are you one of the Missions' Andrews? God Love You! O Have you ever wondered "Just where does my money go? Just how much good does it do and for whom? How desperate are those people any- way?" If you have, Bishop Sheen's new movie "The 30th Parallel" will answer all your quest- ions. Those of us who live above the 30th parallel cannot envision the horror and anguish of those who live below. Hunger is not merely an eco- nomic problem; it is a moral and spiri!ual one-- a greater danger to our future /ban atomic war- downgrading of ibe natural dig- nity of the state when it per- forms its task for the commu- nity, limiting itself to things of this world, thus recognizing hu- man personality and putting it- self at its service. "Therefore, the dignity of the humanperson requires that no one he prevented by public authority, whether privately or publicly, from acting according to his own conscience . . . The chief duty of all public authority is to protect and promote man's inviolable rights . . . From this it follows that it is wrong for public authority to impose on its citizens, through fear, vio- lence or other unjust means, the profession or rejection of any religion or to prevent any- one from joining or leaving any religious group. It is still more against the will of God, as well as against the sacred rights of the in- dividual and of the human family, to use force in any way for the destruetinn or restriction of religion itself, whether in the human race at large, in a particular locality, or in a given religious group," the summary states. "It is the desire of this Vati- can Council that the right of the human person to religious liberty be universally recog- nized by all states, and that it be surrounded by effective safe- guards, so that all citizens may be enabled to exercise their rights and discharge their duties implied by religion. In the de- gree that it makes religious liberty possible, civil society will be granted those blessings which flow from man's fidelity to God and His holy will." Regarding the thorny question of a state religion, the schema says religious liberty does not prevent a particular religious group from receiving special recognition in a given nation, "provided that, at the same time the religious rights of all citizens and all religious groups are recognized and respected." The principle applies also to the freedom of religious groups in the selection and education of their ministers, their com- munication with other religious groups throughout th world, and "the acquisition and en- joyment of appropriate hold- ings." They also have a right to preach publicly and spread their message in print, provided public order is 'not seriously violated and that they do not deny liberty to others by forc- ing their doctrine upon them. This applies particularly to tbe "uneducated and needy," the summary states. With regard to the family, re- ligious liberty implies its' right to organize its own domestic religious life and to determine the kind of religious instruction their children w il I receive. "Civil authorities must recog- nize tbe family's right to gen- uine liberty in the choice of schools or other educational media, nor should they be made to bear unjust burdens because of this free choice. Civil au- thorities violate the rights of parents when they impose an exclusive program of education wh i c h ignores all religious training." Although the declaration has its "proximate foundation in the dignity of the individual, whose exigencies have become more apparent to human rea- son through the experience of centuries," it also supports its arguments from Scripture and Tradition. Among the Scrip- tural references, the document cites "Christ's use of miracles to confirm His teaching or to enable people to accept His teaching while at the same time He "refuses to perform miracles which might force faith out of men not well dis- posed." The Chinch on its part has always retained an unshake- able dootrine "that no nne is to be forced into accepting faith," the summary says, "even though there have been some wbo pursued policies not comformable to the spirit of the Gospel." In Catholie tradition, "the freedom of the Church is a basic principle of the relationships between the Church and eivil organiza- tions." In conclusion, according to the summary, the document recognizes the yearning of mod- ern man for freedom, both in the private and public profes- sion of l"eligion. "This freedom is recognized in many state con- stitutions and international agreements as a civil right. There are areas where this right is proclaimed officially but where civil authority makes such freedom difficult and en- dangers it, This council, hailing the former signs of the times with joy while deploring the latter with deep sadness, asks all men to weigh carefully the importance of religious liberty, especially in present-day life. "The council exhorts 'all men, especially those charged with 'Slight Petting' By JOHN J. KANE Professar af Sociology' University af Nore Dame I am keeping seady company with a nice young man andS" we sometimes engage in petting. I have talked my problem over with a priest and he said this type of "passion" was only for mar- ried people and way not be exercised by anybody else. 1/eel that slight petting doe not arouse the passions so much that you can't "rt control them. What do you think? )4 I THINK you are quite wrong. The priest is quit right. A little "petting" is or can be a dangerous tiring.  I cannot kncw just what you mean by ' slight petting. ' Perhap. everyone has his or her own definition. Let me try to spell  out a bit. Different generations have different terms for what amounts to almost the same thing. Years agn it was called "sponning",o later "necking" and "petting". "Necking" was considered relatively proper. It was limited to a good night kiss or an em - bace. It was not supposed to involve real intimacy, aithoughI,j no doubt at times it did. , We look for innc, cuous word to describe behavior. HE SEX DRIVE is a strong one exceeded only by hunger an'tl thirst. God gave it to us for obvious reasons, the procreai', tion of the human race in marriage and the development gt, mutual love and affection between spouses. Morally. jt may b-e- expressed only in marriage, No doubt you intend to pet only slightly, but even slight petting can arouse nur passions, and when they are aroused i o is quite difficult to control them. This is true of both boys and,q girls, but some absurd convention in our sneiety plaees the matter of control more in the girl's hands than the boys. " You should know that physiologically and psychologicall.- most men are aroused sexually more easily than most woment- There, of course, are exceptions. , When you permit a boy to become familiar, you provoke t:he arousal of. a strong drive in him. It may also happen to you. Just how do you turn this drive off? It isn't like a water faucet which can be stopped by turning the spigot. Eventually, if you continue to permit "slight petting" it wl become serious petting, and ultimately end in sex relations. And this may happen even if you protest. Some men when arousdd become strictly ruthless and do not hesitate to use violence. Ate, incidentally, this can happen even in the case of your "nice young man." - But even if this does not occur, what about your reputatiOr? Some men kiss and tell and. sometimes what -they tell may be a gross exaggeration. Some like to boast of their sexual prowess and conquests, and your "nice young man" may not prove to.be the exception that you apparently believe he is. But far more important, this is a matter of morality. ! think you better have a long and frank talk with your confessor; Spell out for him, so far as he thinks it necessary, what you mean by "slight petting.". Perhaps you have already done .so but you reject his answer. His prudent wards of warning ar: falling on deaf ears. He is in a far better position than Ira mako the moral ju00: ment necessary here. " LL INDIVIDUALS differ in the strength of their sex driv  and their abilities to control them. But no moral m ,an-a1  woman 'is constantly strongenough to resist when the occasiomg of sin are strong and frequent. ,< Look at the figures on pro-marital pregnancies. They arg , not really aeeurate because many are nat revealed. You ca" be eei'tain of one thing, however, they are higher tha n pul',i lished statistics show. The headaches and heartaches associated with a pre-marffal pregnancy are many and severe. I'm certain that a large num,, bet of these cases began with "slight petting", but they nev[ ended there. . ,j If you really love this boy with whom you are associatinj he will have more respect for you and develop a finer and deepe't love if you refuse to allow him improper liberties. " J' How can you be certain he is not merely taking advantage, of you? Naturally, he will assure you this is not thecase. Mil lions of men have always done so, and probably always will Don't be one of the foolish non-virgins. It doesn't matter if every girl in the world behaved this way. Morality is not a matter f statistics. It is a matter of God's law. , .ti IT'S WORTH HUNTING FOR. BOOKS OF INTEREST "Spiritual I:xercises" by Karl Rahner, S.d. $5.50. This" *r world-renowned theologian presents 19natlan Spirff.  ualHy adapted o the present era. Simultaneously(, ': published in three lancjuacjes. "Born For Friendship" by Bernard Basset, S.J. $4.50. r A new biography of Sir Thomas More from the pen of the well-known English Jesuit. Father Bernardi Basset, author of "We Neurotics." "A History Of The Refermation," by John P. Dolan. $6.75. An honest appraisal of he Reformation bya nofed hisforian. Authentic and inferestincj.. FOR THE CHILDREN: " "When I Go To Mass." Text by A.M. Cocagnac.  Translaed by William Barrow. $1.45. Not a Missa|,. but something o make fhe Mass more meanlncjful for " children. Beaufifully illusfrafad in color by Jacques Le Scanff. ." ....... We cordially in;e you o come in and see our wide, selection of disfincfive relicjious articles. If unable, to come in, please do nor hesifate to call. .... t 609 UNION ST, SEATTLE, WN. 8101 PHONE: MU -3Ei28 and Andreas, who bring souls to Jesus. fare. It is around this searing theme that His the responsibility for education, ' Excellency has fashioned "The 30th Parallel." to form men who will be obedi- I FTS & There are groups of children who give carni- It runs for 26 minutes and is available through ent to lawful authority and he C H U R CH vals, puppet shows and fairs to raise money your local ArChdiocesan director, lovers of genuine liberty--men for the Missions; individuals who Write "I can who will judge things in their  O O [3 S| | [C. ,, own minds under 'the light of THE G:IL " LI i:1 do without candy and magazines and enclose Cat out this column, pin your sacrifice to it truth, who will organize their $4; parents who, inspired by their children's and mail to M o s t Reserend Fulton 1. Sheen, 'a sacrifices, add to them. One couple cut out our Ndtional Director of the Society for the Propa. activities with a sense of re- column and attaching the simple note "We gation of the Faith, 366.5th Ave., New York, sponsibility in the pursuit of NY 70001, or your Archdiocesan Director, Rev. whatever qs true and just and bought a used ear instead of a new one" en- Stephen Szemcmo 907 Terry Ave., Seattle 98104. in collaboration with others." t THIS IS A ,fh IPKODUGT III n CATHOLIC