Newspaper Archive of
Catholic Northwest Progress
Seattle, Washington
August 28, 1964     Catholic Northwest Progress
PAGE 9     (9 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 9     (9 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
August 28, 1964
 

Newspaper Archive of Catholic Northwest Progress produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Wounded Know the Wound M By Most Reverend Fulton J. Sheen T is the wounded who know best how to bri.ng sympathy to the wounded. That was why, if the God-Man was ever to have full compassion for the hungry in this world, He had to be hungry. If He was to offer hope to the despairing atheists, He would have to feel that loneliness, which He did when He cried out on the Cross: "My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?" If God had not come down into the slums where He had "no- where to lay His head," the slum dwellers of Latin America might have complained: "What does God know about human suffering?" Some of this Divine compassion has passed into the soul of a little girl in Ohio. She quoted a passage from Mission Magazine and then wrote as follows: "Just as you said, someone cannot realize the sufferings of another until he goes through them himself. For now I un- derstand a little better how the poor in Asia and Africa are suffering. You see, I have to wear a brace on my back. Sometimes it hurts when the doctors adjust it to a new position. I used to have self-pity, but now, when I think of those poor suffering children, it is like com- paring the earth with the sun. With this letter I am enclosing $1.30. I was going to spend it on a present for my mother, but when I thought it over, I could not buy much for $1.30, while a European or an Asian mother could buy food and medicine for herself and her children, Please send this to the Missions for me." How beautiful to know there are such souls in our midst who help redeem the rest of us Catholies! As Our Lord, Who said to the soldiers in the Garden: "Take Me and let the others go," this child thinks of the Mis- sions even when Our Lord leads her into an- other Gethsemane. How she inspires us priests to be victims as was Our Lord! May she inspire you who are woundless to wound yourself with a sacrifice that you may be blessed by the scarred Hands of Our Lord. GOD LOVE YOU to Mr. and Mrs. I. McC. /or $5.20 "This is the money we would have spent on wine to go with our dinner. We send you our sacrifice to buy wine/or the Holy Sacrifice o/ the Mass in the missions." ... to Mrs. A. N. T. /or her jewelry "With this note are a few pieces o/ jewelry which 1 hope you can sell and then give the money /or the poor of the world. ! would like to help more o/ten but my husband and I must clothe and/eed our six growing children. Sometimes the going is rough, but we know how blessed we are com- pared to millions o/ other families in mission lands." . . . to A. L. F. /or $4,726.38 "God has been very good to me and 1 am most happy to give back to Him a portion o/ the material goods He has blessed me with." The color of each of the Worldmission Rosary'B decades symbolizes one of the five continents of the world where missionaries are laboring to bring souls to Christ. Those of you who cannot go to the Missions can strengthen those who work in your place by praying for them. To receive the Worldmission Rosary, which has been blessed by Bishop Sheen, send your request and an offering of $2 to The Society for the Propagation of the Faith, 866 5th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001. Cat out this column, pin your sacrifiees to xt and mail it to Most Rev. Fulton J. Shooa, National Director ef the Society for the Propa- gation of the Faith, $65 - 6th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001, or your Archdiocesan Director, Rev. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Ave., Seattle Feature Films On Television Belliagham KING-'IV (NBC) Channel KVOS-TV Channel 12 KIRO.TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma Seattle KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel 11 KOMO'TV (ABC) Channel 4 KTVW-TV Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobjectionable for General PEtrcage; A-II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-III--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults: A-IV--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults, with reservations; B--Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C--Condemned; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films be/ore being shown on tele. vision dre edited #o on/otto to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, objectionable parts contained in the original plot may be aeteted in the television verston dnd thus the original Legion rating may not be entirely correct.) SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 2:00 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Down Among The Sheltering Palms .............. B 4:00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--From Hell It Came .............................. A-II 5:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Ladles Day ...................................... A-II 9:00 p.m..-,KVOS-TV--The Jazz Singer .................................. A.I 8:30 p.m.KTVW-TV--Cyclone On Horseback ............................ A-I 9:00 p.m.KING-TV--Wlid River .......................................... B 9:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Dangerousiy Yours .............................. A-II 10:00 p.m.--KTNT-TVUncie Harry ...................................... HR 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Wolf Larsen .................................... A-Ill 11:00 p.m.KIRO-TVKltty ................................................ B 11:1S p.m.--KING-TV--Ambush at Tomahawk Gap ........................ B 11:15 p.m.KOMO-TV--The Girl He Left Behind .......................... B 12:30 a.m.--KVOS-TV--Never ADult Moment ........................... A-II SUNDAY, AUGUST 30 2:00 p,m.--KING-TV--Lullaby of Broadway ............................ A-It 3:00 p.m.--KOMO-TVThe Tail Target .................................. A.I 3:00 p.m.--KIRO.TV--Thunder Cloud ..................................... NR 4:30 p.m.mKTVW-TV--Aggle Apaleby .................................... NR d:00 p.mKVOS-TV-- 7:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--LIoyds of London ................................ A-II 7:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--BOrn to Love .................................... NR 11:00 p.m.KVOS.TV--Piaymales ......................................... A-II 11:15 p.m.KOMO-TV--The Unknown ..................................... A-I !1:15 p.m.--KIRO-TVThe Most Dangerous Sin ..................... ...A-Ill MONDAY, AUGUST 21 9:0e a.m.--KOMO-TV--Return of the Texan ............................. A-I 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--In Old Kentucky ................................. NR 3:30 p.m.KTVW-TV--They Met in Argentina .......................... NR 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV--The Big Gusher .................................... A-I $:30p.m.--KVOS-TV--A Lnwless Street ................................... B 7:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Dangerous Profession ........................... A-II 7:30 p.m.--KING-TV--Man On Fire ........................................ B 10:00 p.m.KTNT-TV--Danger, Love At Work ........................... A.II 10:45 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Curtaln Call ...................................... A-I 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--lrene ............... .............................. A-II 11:15 p.m.--KIRO-TV--The Lady Eve ....................................... B 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV--The Green Eyed Blonde ......................... A-II TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER ! 9:00 a.m.--KOMO-TV-- 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV-- 3:00 p.m.--KOMO1TV--Chase A Crooked Shadow ........................ A-I 3:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV--Beyond Monbasa .................................. A-I 3 30 p m.--KTVW-TV--Falcan \\;Takes Over .............................. A-II 5:30 p.m T-KVOS-TV--Father Was A Fullback .......................... A-II 7:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--The Meanest Man In the World .................. A.II 7:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Beyond the Rockies ........ ' ...................... NR 10:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Chetnlksl ........................................... A-I 10:30 p.m,--KTVW-TV--Cansolatlon Marriage ............................. NR 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Mr, and Mrs. Smith ................................ B 11:15 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Mansleur Beaucalre .............................. A-II 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Helen Morgan Story .............................. A-II WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV-- 2:00 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Shleld For Murder ................................. B 3:30 p.m.KTVW-TV--Mexican Spitfire At Sea ......................... A-II 3:30 p.m.KING-TV--When Tomorrow Comes .......................... A-II $:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV-- 7:00 p.m.--KIRO.TV--Magnlflcent Roughneck ............................ A-I 7:00 p.m.--KTVW.TV--Carear ......................................... A-I 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Daltons Ride Again .............................. A-I 10:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Law of the Underwarlc . ......................... A-II 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV-- 11:00 p.m.--KOMO-TV--SSerro Baron .................................... A-II 11:15 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Hour Berate oawn .................................. " THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER $ 9:00 o.m.--KOMO-TV--Don't Bother To Knock ............................ B 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Daitons Ride Again .............................. A-! 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV--They Rode West ................................... A- of Kong ............................ . ......... NR. $:3O p.m.--KVOS-TV--Son 7:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--The Third Man .................................. A- ll 7:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Play Girl .......................................... 13 10:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Foce At The Window ............................ NR 1Q:30 p.m.--KTVW.TV--Pettlcaat Larceny ................................ A-II 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Web of Evidence ........... ..................... A.Ill 11:15 p.m--KIRO-TV--Rldlng High ......................................... ,1. 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV--Bernad ne ......................................... A-t 1:00 a.m.--KVOS-TV-- FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 Zero down, S years to pay : i PA 2-4463 g | HEEHEY C OHSTRUCTIOH CO. = a llnnilgiinggiuilguiln nm LAkeview 4-0666 Seattle Calenclar SUNDAY, AUGUST 30, FIF- TEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, MASS: Inclina, Domino -- Bow down thy ear (Green) GI., Cr., Prof. of Trim Mass of Faith. MONDAY, AUGUST 31, ST. RAYMOND NONNATUS, CON- FESSOR, MASS: Os justi -- The mouth of the just (Com. of Conf.) (White). GI. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, COMMEMORATION OF , ST. GILES, ABBOTT, MASS as on Sun. (Green). No GI., 2rid Pr. of St. Giles, 3rd of 12 Holy Bros., no Cr., Com. Prof. Or MASS: Os justi -- The mouth of the just (Com. of Abbots) (White). GI., 2nd Pr. of 12 Holy Bros. WEDNESDAY, S E P T E M- BER 2, ST. STEPHEN, KING, CONFESSOR, MASS: Os justi -- The mouth of the just (White). Gl. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, ST. PlUS X, POPE, CON- FESSOR, MASS: Extuli -- I have raised up (White). Gl. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, FERIAL FRIDAY, MASS as on Sun. (Green). No Gl,, no Cr., Com. Prof. First Fri: Votive Mass of Sac. Heart (White). Gl., Prof. of Sac. Heart. Ab- stinence, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, ST. LAWRENCE JUSTIN- IAN, CONFESSOR, MASS: Statuit -- The Lord made to him (White). G. First Sat: Vo- tive Mass of Immac. Heart permitted (White). GI., 2nd Pr. of St. Lawrence, Pref. of B.V. M. fish Headlines and Deadlines: Demos the Board Walk Leaving their desks cluttered with vital business, members of both houses of Congress re- cessed Friday until next Mon- day, when legislative routine will be resumed. Many of them went to the Convention Hall facing Atlantic City's boardwalk, while others watched the proceedings on television. None of them witnessed any great surprises, least of all President Lyndon B. Johnson's unopposed nomination. The most dramatic moment came when he appeared on television in G White House statement Wednesday night and announced his choice of his vice-presidential running mate, Senator Hubert Hum- phrey of Minnesota. For weeks, conjecturing had become a popular pastime on the part of columnists and commentators as well as the general public. The well-kept secret heightened the interest in the convention as R whole. The disputations occasioned over the seating of Alabama and Mississippi delegations did not impair the smooth opera- tions of the planned program, thus marking it as one of the most placid in the history of Democratic Party presidential nominating conventions. The speeches were what one would normally expect under the circumstances, a sustained panegyric of the Administra- tion's achievements during the past four years. There were overtones, h o w e v e r, which seemed to indicate that the cam- paign would center about the general theme of "extremism" rather than about specific is- sues. It may still be a bit too early at deadline to comment on the peculiar absence of any reports on the foreign press reaction or on the un- usual silenco in Moscow. Khrushchev's criticism o r commentary may be expected shortly, for it Seems improb- able that he could refrain from making some sort of propa- ganda out of the internal affairs of another country. Moscow's press reporters and photographers were in Atlantic City during the week taking note of the capitalistic goings- on. Demo Platform Viewed as a whole, the lengthy platform this year was notable for its lack of new .proposals. While listing a num- ber of items which failed of passage during the present ses- sion of Congress, the platform contained nothing else really different from legislation al- ready introduced. The preamble was devoted exclusively to a recitation of asserted progress made since January, 1961, accentuating the Administration's victories over Communism, and action taken which made Khrushchev "back down" and "cave in." Other points prominently reviewed w e r e economic growth, full employment and general prosperity. B r i g h t a r e a s in education, civil rights, social seeurity and housing were outlined, al- though need for further wel- fare legislation and continued war on poverty was noted. The following excerpts were taken from the body of the platform as presented on the convention floor without notice- able opposition, much less a fight. Domestic Affairs Civil Rights: The Civil Rights barbecue tonight ? marvelous KIKi(OM00 9:00 o.m.--KOMO-TV--You Know What Sailors Are ........................ 2:00 p.m.--KTNr.TV--Doubtlng Thomas .................................. NR 3:30 p.m.--KING-TV--Secret of Treasure Mountain ...................... A-II $:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Serpent of the Nile ................................. B 7:00 p.m--KTVW-TV--Back to Bataan .................................. A-!! 7:00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Boy From Indiana ................................ -N 10:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--I-aw of the Streets ................................ NR 10:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Professlonal Sweetheart .......................... NR 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Mr. Lucky ........................................ A.I_I 11:15 p.m--KlRO-TV--The Uninvited ......... ............................. " -" "'tPrnvakn marinade 11:30p.m.--KOMO-TV--Twelve O'Clock High ........... ... ............. A-I OVIIJ Imeau ls Review m s;nsored g) laIN Ca'['hO''C Ghc''S jL ChurCh GOOdSz IrlC' The christian Brthers' Nape' callfrnla Religious goods Mr e home, church end Kimol. ---- I  i A pleasant shollng atmosphere with O lelelt I IW i ,ar,v of re,,s,eu, s'",. Ask for it at your favorite food store BL W AB WHY PAY MORE? 607 Union St., Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 illlllllllnllllngllllll " SAME// t,ste i COMPLETE [ /smell t MOUTH ! : R:MODELING SERVICE I effectiveness WASH e Insured m u References m. as the "over.priced brand ,u,.., 49' ONLY AMBER, RED or BLUE Burke Soles Co., Seattle ! By George N. Kramer, Ph.D. DOCTOR KRAMER Reviews the News Act of 1964 deserves and re- quires full observance by every American and fair, effective en- forcement if there is any de- fault. Fiscal Balance: Every penny of Federal spending must be accounted for in terms of the strictest economy, efficiency and integrity. We pledge to continue a frugal government, getting a dollar's value for a dollar spent, and a government worthy of the citizen's confi- dence. Our goal is a balanced budget in a balanced economy. Education: New methods of financial aid must be ex- plored, including the channeling of federally-collected revenues to all levels of education, and, to the extent permitted by the Constitution, to all schools. Lawlessness: We affirm our belief that lawless disregard of the rights of others is wrong-- whether used to deny e q u a 1 rights or to obtain equal rights. We cannot and will not taler- at lawlessness. We can and will seek to eliminate its economic and social causes. Care for Aged: We will con- tinue to fight until we have suc- ceeded in including hoslfital care for older Americans in the Social Security program... Extremism: We condemn ex- tremism, whether from the right or left, including the ex- treme tactics of such organiza- tions as the Communist Party, the Ku Klux Klan and the John Birch Society. Employment: Full employ- ment is an end in itself and must be insisted upon as a priority objective. Foreign Affairs The keynote of the section of the platform dealing with for- eign policy was "peace." This section was quite brief com- pared with that dealing with domestic issues. Following are some of the pertinent extracts: Peace: We offer as the goal of this covenant peace for all nations and freedom for all people. Peace should be the first concern of all governments as it is the prayer of all men. Red Aggression: In 1960, free- dom was on the defensive. The Communists--doubting both our strength and our will to use it--pressed forward in South- east Asia, Latin America, Cen- tral Africa and Berlin . . . Re- sponsible leadership, unafraid but refusing to take needless risk, has turned the tide in freedom's favor. No nation, old or new, has joined the Commu- nist bloc since Cuba during the preceding Republican Adminis. tration. Military Strength: Until such time as there can be an en- forceable treaty providing for inspected and verified disarma- ment, we must, and we will maintain our military strength, as the sword and shield of free- dom and the guarantor peace. Arms Race: Through our policy of never negotiating from fear but never fearing to negotiate, we are slowly but surely approaching the point where effective international agreements providing for in- spection and control can begin to lift the crushing burden of armaments off the backs of the people of the world... We are determined to continue all-out effort through fully enforceable measures to halt and reverse the arms race and bring to an end the era of nuclear terror. United Nations: We will main- tain our solemn commitment to the United Nations . . . We continue to oppose the admis- sion of Red China to the United Nations. Captive Nations: Encourage by all peaceful means the grow- ing independence of the captive peoples living under Commu- nism . . . We deplore Commu- nist oppression of Jews and other minorities. Cuba: Move actively to carry out the resolution of the Or- ganization of American States to further isolate Castroism and speed the restoration of free- dom and responsibility in Cuba. Foreign Aid: Expand t h e Peace Corps. Use even more of our food for peace. Help the people of developing nations in Asia, Africa and Latin America raise their standards of living and create conditions in which freedom and independence can flourish. These, as the platform docu- ment states, are some of "the principles which command our cause and strengthen our ef- fort as we cross the New Fron- tier and enter upon the great society." Now there's a catchy phrase for the coming campaign. Khanh Quits While the Cyprus dispute con- tinues to simmer on the back burner, the Vietnamese mess is reaching the boiling point. Once again, dispatches from Saigon rehearsed t h e well- recognized "student" riot s which upset the government. After a term of only nine days as President, Nguyen Khanh became a major general in the South Vietnamese army again. He bowed out Tuesday in an effort to placate the dem- onstrators who protested against his "dictatorship" and engaged in acts of violence. In stepping down he also scrapped the constitution which was drawn up by a revolution- ary council a week ago last Sunday and likewise dissolved the council. Technically, this leaves Gem Duong Minh in the top spot, but the solution to the problem is not quite so simple. The asserted action of dis- gruntled Buddhists a g a i n s t Catholics has injected the ugly note of religious conflict, but from here it looks like more of the same old Communist- inspired troublemaking, where- by the Viet Cong can win with- out military action. There can 'be no doubt but that the demonstrations have been designed for the sole pur- pose of weakening the govern- ment of South Vietnam and with it the ability to resist. There is also the accompany- ing anti-American c r u s a d e, which is always a sure sign of Communist leadership. Civilian Control Khanh is still chairman of the military council, e v e n though he resigned as president chosen by the revolutionary group. At deadline, the military junta was to elect a new na- tional leader who in turn would  -.....j select 300 civilians to a national EVERY MONTH IS SANDWICH MONTH WHEN THEY'RE MADE with SUNNY JIM PEAHUT BUTTER JAMS, JELLIES and PRESERVES At ALL Better Grocery Stores __...._.____._._ congress which would draft a new constitution. This man may be Maj. Gem Nguyen Khanh. In any event, the new con- stitution is to be certified at a general election, and the gov- ernment thereafter would be under exclusive civilian control. While all this may seem de- sirable on the part of the ma- jority of demonstrators, there seems to be no assurance that once it is done, there will be an end to dissension. "1urther - more, there is no guarantee that the military leaders will permit an inexperienced and probably controversial civilian authority to previal over the prosecution of the war against the Communists. Meanwhile, the U.S. is caught squarely and helplessly in the middle of the internal strife. Legion Of Decency First-Run Movies Showing In Seattle B--Night of the Iguana. Other Movies Currently Showing A-l--The Moon Spinners, The Patsy, The Raven, It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World, A Hard Day's Night, Thomasina, Hotarl, Young Guns of Texas. A-2 -- Unsinkable Molly Brown, Good Neighbor Sam, Distant Trumpet. A-3--Biklni Beach, The KHlers, Man's Favorite Sport, Pink Panther. A-4---The Best Man, The Cool World. B--A Shot In the Dark, Lady in a Cage, Irma La Oouce, Some LAke It Hot, Black Sabbath, Mosque Of Red Death, Carpetbaggers, What: A Way TO GO, Viva LOS Vegas. Condemned--Please Not Naw. FrTdy, Augusf 28, 1964 THE PROGRESS--9 ,, . . 'Doesn't Youth Have o, Respect for Elders?'L 2 By John J. Kone, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame Doesn't the younger generation have any respect for older people? Is it old /ashioned today to honor thy parents? I am in my 60's and I often hear young people complain that older people should retire so that they can get jobs. I have even heard com. plaints that it costs too much to take care o[ the many old people we have today and we should think o/ euthanasia, lust recently I overheard my niece say, "'Why doesn't my aunt give me some o/ her money now? Why do 1 lave to wait until she dies? She has plenty." NE sign of getting old, perhaps even more def- inLte than years, is the attitude that somehow or other the younger generation is not what it used to be. About 2,000 years ago a Roman poet, Horace, wrote critical- ly of people who praised imes that are past. In other words, distance does lend enchantment, and as we grow older, the past appears to be m'uch rosier than it ever was in reality. The good old days in many respects were not nearly so good as they seem in retrospeet. Living conditions were much harsher for most people than they are today. Infant and maternity mortality rates were high. Life expectancy wan much shorter, and orphans more common. But it is this very area of social change, increased life expectancy, of which you are inquiring. Time was when it was expected that children would take care of their parents in old age. Pensions were virtually un- known, the old age and survivors insurance had not yet come into being, and few could save adequately for the proverbial "rainy day." But, on the other hand, there were relatively few people who lived to be 65, 70 or 75 years of age. Today, almost 10 per cent of the American population is 65 years of age or older. In the past it is true that many children did care for their parents in old age, but it is also true that there were relatively few parents to be cared for. Increased longevity has demanded that some type of pan- sion or old age financial security be provided for older per- sons. Sometimes ehildren are not capahle of supporting their aged parents while they are trying to rear a family 0f their own. At other times, unfortunately, they are callous to the needs of their aged parents. So it simply makes good sense for private business and government to join together through pensions and Social Se- curity to provide financial help for those who are forced into retirement at the age of 65, sometimes younger. l am certain the vast maiority of young people do not share the attitudes and feelings of those you have described. Admittedly, there is certain impatience, among young men particularly, to get ahead. Sometimes they do see the way to promotion blocked by older persons and at times this is resented. But as compulsory retirement at 65 becomes more and more common, this situation will become increasingly rare. It seems quite likely that the age of retirement will be even yonnger in the immediate future. This, of course, raises problems about providing adequate financial security for the aged. All Americans are going to have to face the fact that to provide for senior citizens will cost money. But if this, the most prosperous nation in the world, cannot take care of its older citizens adequately, where else can they be taken care of? Those who complain about the cost of caring for the aged, should recall that these people during their productive years made it possible for the young and middle aged people of today to acquire an education from tax money. Many of these people fought in World War I in defense of their country and future generations. Even more importantly, they may recall that if they survive, they too will face many of the problems that the aged Americans face today. The obligation to honor thy mother and father ts stir as vital and as binding as it was centuries ago. Today, however, it tends to take on a new kind of meaning. In many cases, parents, while not wealthy, can manage to get by adequately on the combination of pensions and Social Security. In many cases they do not depend for financial support upon their children, although even today some do. But what older parents long for, even more than financial se- curity, are the love and affection of their children. HE son who provides comfortably for an aged mother but never visits her, is scarcely honoring his mother. The daugh- ter who pays a handsome fee to keep her aged father in a nursing home, but never visits him or writes him, is not honoring her father. Older people are deeply aware that most of their lives are over. But they can enjoy their remaining years more fury, if they can live a bit vicariously. By that I mean, if they can share the joys and pleasures of their children and grand- children. A niece who would ask why her aunt doesn't give her money now instead of making her wait until she dies, may have been guilty, in a moment of frustration, of a most uncharitable state- ment. Certainly, it was a stupid thing to say, even if the niece thought only on a mercenary level .... The very fear that you might hear this and perhaps leave her nothing might have stilled her tongue. But once again, I do not think you should take a few cases and consider them typical of all the young Americans. Youth does change from generation to generation, and it might be wise for all of the aged and middle aged to realize that once upon a time older people were wringing thei hands over them too. This is not to minimize some of the very serious problems posed by America's youth today, but it is to remind everyone that there have always been segments of America's youth that provided a serious social problem. There probably always will be. But so long as the ideals of Christianity prevail, deprivation of the aged and mistreatment of parents can never become an accepted way of life. SUNDAY, AUGUST 30 8:oo o.m., Lamp Unto My Feat, KIRO. TV, Channel 7. The Most Reverend Charles H. Helm- sing, Bishop of Kansas City will be guest questioned by a panel of re- ligious newspaper editors. SUNDAY, AUGUST 30 ii: p.m., Challenge, KOMO.TV, Chan- nel 4. Panelists Rabbl Raphael Levlne, Rev. William Treacy and Dr. Lynn Carson will discuss Grandparents and In. Laws "Tne Frings of the Fanllly." 7:15 p.m., Sacred Heart Program, KTVW-TV, ChannM 13. The Rev. Charles F. X. Dolon, S.J,, will give the last talk In the series "Safeguarding Mentat Health," entitled "Moderation, the Rule for Mental Health." NIGHTLY 11:30 p.m. to 12 midnight, Tho Rosary, KTVW-TV, Channel 13. Sign-off broadcast, a decade of the Rosary In beautiful picture lnd sound. SATURDAY, SUNDAY 9:30-10:00 p.m. The Rmmry, KTVW-TV, Channel 13. Sign-off broadcost, a decade of the Rosary In beautiful pldure ond soun{I WEEK-END SPECIAL!00 [7 At Your Favorite... FREE BREAD . . . by refunding 35 to customers who mail in two labels from White Star Tuna and a receipt from your bread purchase. Chunk 4/1.00 WHITE STAR TUNA .... .o. T00.s PRICES EFFECTIVE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, AUG. 28 and 29