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August 2, 1963     Catholic Northwest Progress
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August 2, 1963
 

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Friday, Augu,sf 2, I%3 THE PROGRESS5 Decline in Love of Mass ..... O '':'I: ' By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SIEEN ' op My A missionary bishop from Africa giving for remembrance. e dollar or few Do I St r asked us to send him $300 a month doUars yuu give to the "pool' would ao more E y plf' " g? Eckhart : sole support of his priests. We had none to offer, in Mrica or Asia. Why? Because the faithful today are less con- By REV. WALTER IMBIORSKI scious that the Mass is Calvary re-visited, that Saint Paul said that a priest should offer sac- Family Lifo Director, Archdiocese of Ch|e.ago we 'die with Christ at the Consecration and rifice for his own sins. Shall not the faithful? Guest Columnist for Rev. John L. Thommh S.J. John "live a resurrected life with Him in Commun- You are an individual with your own burden of Reviewing Father Hans Keung "THAT THE W O R L D MAY BELIEVE," by Rev. Hans Kueng, Shoed & Ward, 150 p., 3.00. ATHER Kueng represents a point of view. Whether or not you person- ally are in his camp is not at issue in this book. What is at issue is that this book is not very well written. There is a valid reason for reporting this conclusion. The author, already world famous as a theologian, should stick to his deep German theo- logical guns and not try to change the image in mid- stream. He is not, or at least has not proven to be any one's kindly old uncle Hans by the technique he has attempted in this book. In this short work he pro- pounds some of his basic thoughts on dialogue, reform, ecumenicism and reunion, in the form of supposedly homey, warm epistles to a close acquaintance, a la 'It is cer- tainly a good thing that you and Yvonne (?) have begun to talk about your religion." Well boy-howdy I also think it's a good deal for Mr. X and There is a place for this of discourse, but it must done by a craftsman. If boat is missed, as I think Kueng has missed By JOHN J. ECKHART the boat, the result is a hokey contrivance that tastes flat and fails to ring true. I would also be a little wary about reccommending this book to any who did not have a really competent understanding as regards pagans and non- Catholics, and their relation- ship to "baptism by desire," the full extent of the mystery of The Mystical Body, and the work of actual grace. It is a matter of emphasis with Father Kueng, as indi- cated in such statements as, "As against this, we Christians believe ALL men, wherever and whenever they have lived, can be saved by the grace of God in Jesus Christ." True enough! So is the point. "But the Protestant Chris. tian does belong, if he is in good faith, to the same one Church, the one ark of salva- tion for all." But even basic truth, if em- phasized in one way can mis- lead these less theologically sophisticated than Father Kueng. Just a caution. "LOOKING TOWARD THE COUNCIL," Edi-. ted by Joseph E. Cun- neen, Herder" and Her- der, paperback, 154 p., 1.95. HILE this book was pub- lished prior to the first part of Vatican II, it can still be perused with profit as fur- ther background and material for the second session. It is a collection of Chris- tian authors looking toward the work of the couneil, their hopes, and in some instanees, e.g., Cardinal Bea, some real- istic aspirations eoneerning the council. Many shades of thought are represented. Father G e o r g e s Mollard would immediately do away with all titles in the Church, call Bishops "Mister," marry off the clergy, and slip into high vernacular gear. He mentions the goodness of some practical steps to be taken, but fails to mention the specifics. Some Italian laymen do their little bit to emasculate the great virtue of humility and call for less filial obedi- ence from the laity. There is sore downright whining from an Anglican. And there are excellent ar- ticles by John Bannan, M. D. Chenu, and Daniel Callahan. Father H. A. Reinhold lashes out again at the old "absolution machine," but all in all you should find this book thought provoking, something less than apocalyptic, but thought pro- voking. Feature Films On Television Belllngham KING.TV (NBC) Channel 5 Channel 12 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma Seattle KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel n (ABe) Channel 4 KTVW-TV Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobjectionable for General Patrccage; A.II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-III--Morally Unobjectionab;e for Adults: B--Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C-Condemned; SC--Separate Classification; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films before being shown on tele- vision are edited to conform to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, objectionable parts contained in the original plot may be deleted in the television version and thus the original Legion rating may not be entirely correct,) SATURDAY, AUGUST 3 :h00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Henry Aldrich Swings If ............................ A-I 2:00 p.m.--KVOS.TV--EI Alameln ......................................... A-I 2:SO p.m.--KING-TV--Dr. Klldare'S Crisis ............................... A-II 2:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Melody Cruise ..................................... NR 4:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--Son9 of the Saddle ................................. NR S:00 p.m.--KING.TVFeudln' Fools ...................................... A-I 6:1$ p.m.KTVW-TV--Along the Rio Grnnde ............................ .A.I 9:00 p.m.--KING-TVKangoroo .......................................... A-II 1000 p.m.KTNT-TV--Or. X .............................................. NR 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Meet the Mlssas .................................... A-I 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--AnthonY Adverse .................................. A-ll 11:00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--The Jazz Singer ................................... A-I 11:05 p.m.--KING.TV--Fortunes of Or. aloud ............................... A.I 1]:0S p.m.--KOMO-TV--Angels In the Outfield ............................. A-I 1:00 a.m.KTVW.TVBachelor Apartment .............................. NR SUNDAY, AUGUST 6 t2:00 noon---KOMO-TV--Young People ..................................... A.I 2:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--RoaneV ............................................. A-I 2:$0 p.m.KOMO-TV--The Noose Hnns High ............................ A.I I:$0 p.m.--KIRO-TVThe Llht That Foiled ................................ e hJ0 p.m.KING-TVTwo Smart People ................................. A.II I:$0 p.m.KTNT-TVTnrzon end His Mate ............................... NR I:$0 p.m.KTVW-TVBamboe Blonde .................................. A-It T:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--Arsonlc ond Old Loce .............................. A.II :30 p,m.--KOMO-TV--Ntaht Fighters ................................... A.II :0S p.m.KING.TVwFost and Furious ................................. A-II MONDAY, AUGUST S e.m.--KOMO-TV--Vou're Telling Mo ............................... A.II e.m.--KTVW-TV--Dna Don Wllffums ............................... A-I ght Sony ....................................... A-I ).m.--KTNT-TV--,Ive Me our Heart .............................. A.H ,.m.KING-TVThe Borkteys ot erondwoy (Part I1 .............. A.II ..m.KVOS.TVSound Off ......................................... A-I $.m.--KING-TVMv Cousin Rachel ................................ A-H ,.m.KTNT-TVDameS ............................................. NR .m.KTVW.TV$alnVs Double Trouble ........................... A.I ).m.K'VOS.TVActlon In the North Atlontlc ........................ A-I1 .m.--KOMO-TV--Sweethearf of the Campus ......................... A.I a.m.KTVW-TVI'm From the City ................................ A-I TUESDAY, AUGUST 6 a.m.KOMO-TV--Wonderbar ........................................ NR o.m.--KTVW-TV--AImost a Genflemnn ............................. A.I noon--KTVW.TV--Once Upon 1 Honeymoon ........................... n p.m.KTNT-TVnomeS ............................................. N R p.m.KlNG-TVSarklegs of eroodwoy (Port II) ................... A.II p.m.--KVO$-TV--Plrofes of Monterey ................................ A-I *.m.--KTVW.TV--Dance, Girls, Dunce ................................. B i p.m.KVOS-TV--Whlfe eflnners .................................... A-[ p.m.KOMO-TV--AII By Myself ...................................... e p.m.KTNT-TVAn Angel from Texas ............................... A-I o.m.--KTVW-TV--Falcon In Mexico ................................. A-H WeDNESDAYt AUGUST 7 a.m.KOMO-TVMoonllaht in Vermont ............................ A.I o.m.--KTVW-TV--Meef the Missus .................................. A.I on a eel ..................................... A-I hm.--KTNT-TV--The eiff Punch .................................... A-I ).m.--KING-TV--The Bishop Misbehaves ............................. NR ).m.KVOS.TVMon with the Gun ................................ A.II |.m.--KTVW-TV--Return of Peter Grlmm ........................... NR Girl In the World ......................... NR ).m.--KTNT-TV--eeyond the Forest ................................... n I.--KVOS-TVOn Dangerous Ground ............................ A-II In a Bungalow ................................ A-I .m.--KTVW-TV--WIIdeat Bus ....................................... A-I THURSDAY, AUGUST S Love Song ................................. A-ll Glrl In the World .......................... NR n--KTVW-TV--Return of Peter Grimm ............................ NR the Forest ................................. B Town (Pnrt t') ............................... A.II Snow ......................................... A.I Llon nnd the Horse ............................. B City' Revels ................................ A.I Since Eve ................................... A-I Lovers Meet ................................ NR Jet ......................................... A.I Over WYamlng ............................. A.I Jane Turner ............................... A.I FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 One Born Every Minute ................. A-ll Miles from Alcatraz ....................... A-II Girls, Dance ................................ e Since Eve ................................... A.I Town (Part 11) ............................. A-II Lady ......................................... A.I n,--KTVW-TV--Oangerous Mission ............................... A-I n,--KTVW.TV--Parachute Bnftallon .............................. A-I Male Animal .................................. A-II n.lKVOS-TVBroadWoy ......................................... A-II n,--KVOS-TV--Then'--KOMO'TV-'CopperReturnSky :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ulfbresd ............................................. B This Review Is Sponsored by Cahollo Gifts l Church Goods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasant shopping atmosphere wlth a select varietY of religious gifts. 607 Union St., Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 ion. And the reason for the decline in the love of the Mass? Our faithful are being propagan- dized to make an offering "to be remembered" in a Mass or Masses. No Mass is said in strict justice for each dollar offered; rather the money is "pooled," and sometimes an elaborate card is offered reading: "You are remembered in a thousand Masses by . . . " May we remind our readers: 1) You are remembered in 400,000 Masses each day without offering a cent. Each member of Christ is remembered in every Mass by every priest, every day in every land of the world. 2) The pastor of your parish is bound in jus- tice not just to remember you, but to offer Mass for you 36 times a year. 3) It is one thing to be "remembered" in the Sacrifice of Calvary; it is quite another matter to "participate in it." There is a difference be- tween being "remembered" by those who sit at a meal, and eating the meal yourself. Instead, therefore, of entering into a "pool" of remembrance, have the Holy Sacrifice of. fered for your intention personally and in strict justice. The obligation the priest has to apply the Mass to you personally is created by an offering no greater than what you are now i Readers Legion Of Decency First-Run Movies Showing In Seattle A-I--PT 109. A-3--Toys In The Afllo. Other Movies Write Manner of Dignity Editor, The Progress: It is my sincere hope that all of the citizens of Seattle will approach the racial prob- lem in a manner of dignity to all concerned. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, there is a definite need to al- low each and everyone of us the opportunity to live where we have the ability to pay. Intelligent planning on both sides with NO DELAY is needed in explaining all facets of property values and fears of those who foresee any ave- nue of detriment. Intelligent Currently Showing planning will prepare each side A-l--It's Only Money, How The Wt to fulfill the end result, as Was Won, Summer Magic, Strofegla Air Command, Great Escape, The Longest Christians, with the full intent Day, Sword Of Sherwood Forest, Tammy to make the word, "neighbor," And The Docior. A-2--Young Racers, It Hnppened At a living reality. The World's Fair, TO Kill A Mocking- TO seek a ordinance, that blrd, F[awer Orum Song, Girls Girls Girls, Donovan's Reef, Courtship Of will eliminate the ability of Eddie's Father, Showdown. one to refuse to sell property A-3--Period Of Adjustment, Bye Bye Birdie, Muting Game, Spencer'$ Moun- thin, Hud. A-4--L-Shoped Room. B--Main Attrnctlon, Explosive Genera- tion, Dr. No, Irma Ln Deuce, Palama Gome, Los Girls, Elmer Gontry, Under- world U.S.A. Candemned--Phaedra, Cold Wind tn August. SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 7:30 o.m., Catholic Hour, KING-Radio. (1090 kc.) The Rev. Wl*llam McNamera, O.C.D., aulhor of "The Art of Being Humon" will speak on this program ouch Sun- day In August. Father will base his talks on his book. 7:45 a.m., Hour of St. Francis, KXA. Radio, (770 ka.) Whof causes a girl from a fine tota- lly to be faced with the decisions of an unwed mother? Todoy's pro- gram gives the answer In '*Not To A Girl Like Me." 10:30 a.m., Catholic HoUr, KING-W, Channel 5. Four conversations on the Second Vatican Counc;I will be presenled every Sunday marnlng during August at this time. James O'Gara, manag- ing editor of fhe Commonweal Moga- zlne, will be host. A Protestanf clergymon will be the guest on today's show, '*A Conversa- tion with Dr. Frederick Grant." Dr. Grant is one of the official delegate- observers far the Anglican Communion, appotnled by lhe Archbishop of Canter- bury to represent the Amerlcen Epis- copal Church. 6:00 p.m., Challenger KOMO.TV, Chert-. nel 4. "If There's A God, Prove It"--the age-old question raised by skeptics-- will be discussed by panelists Rev. Wllllom Treaty, Dr. Lynn Corson ond Rabbi Raphael Levlne. to another because of his race only is not unjust when all other avenues have failed. A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law of God. Segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality. It gives the segregator a false sense of superiority and the segregated a false sense of in- feriority. We will do well to search our hearts and minds at this point in the life of a great city. Walter T. Hubbard Jr. 1800 27th Ave., Seattle For Minority Buyers Editor, The Progress: In the name of democracy and on behalf of our minority buyers, we of the Fair Housing Listing Service wish to thank you for making your readers aware of how they can help in housing integration. As a result of your article, several fair-minded subscribers have listed with us, and we are most grateful. C. Jean Jones, Fair Housing Listing Service. We have a family of five. Within the last month our sin. Therefore, personally present the Death of Christ to the Holy Father for your offenses. In addition to your regular sacrifice this month, why not send an extra dollar or two to have a missionary offer a Mass for you personally? GOD LOVE YOU to R.F. for $20 "Giving to those in need is far more satisfy- ing than a night on the town." . . . to A.L. G. /or $10 "In thanksgiving or a aver re- ceived." . . . to a Teenager /r $2 "'Please use this to help bring the word o Christ to those who have never heard it.".., to S.M. L. /or $2 "'This is for someone who has so much less than I do." Worldmission, a quarterly magazine of mis- sionary activities edited by Most Reverend Ful- ton 5. Sheen, is the ideal gift for priests, nuns, seminarians, hymen. Send $5 for a one-year sub- scription to Worldmission, 366 5th Ave., New York 1, N.Y. Cut out this column, pin your saerifiees to it and mail it to Most Roy. Fulton J. Sheen, National Director of the Society for the Propa- gation of the Faith, 365 - 5th Ave., New York 1, N. Y., or your Archdiocesan Director, Rev. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle 4. What's 004ark on Paper? (Continued from Page 1) as "a shaft of light cut into the darkness," he fell far short of suggesting that it was a break- through for peace. Conceding that it had definite limitatio'ns, he nevertheless contended that it was a step toward further negotiations with the Soviets. "This treaty is not the mil- hninm," he said. "It will not resolve all conflicts, or cause the Communists to forego their ambitions, or eliminate the danger of war. It will not reduce our need for arms or allies or programs of assist- ance to others. But it is an important first step--a step toward peace--.a step toward reason--a step away from war." This fairly well summarizes the President's appraisal of a treaty he seems determined to rush through the U.S. Senate for ratification. Furthermore, President Ken- nedy emphasized the points that the treaty draft was a very lim- ited one, that it "reflects no concessions either to or by the Soviet Union," and that "secret violations are possible and se- cret preparations for a sudden withdrawal are possible." While it will not prevent this nation from testing un- derground or from being ready to resume atmospheric tests if the acts of others so require, it gives us a concrete The answer lies in an eager- ness to negotiate with the So- viets on other matters such as a non-aggression pact and total disarmament. The Soviets re- fused to initial the nuclear test ban treaty until the West prom- ised to enter into serious sub- stantive discussions on this mat- ter after consultations with our allies. In other words, while the treaty draft on the surface ap- pears innocuous, and also in- effective, its sole purpose con- sists in that first step toward "reduced world tensions and broader agreement" with Moscow. The general impression has been that this was a great vic- tory for the West, specifically for the U.S., because the So- viets finally saw it our way. For five years the Soviets had turned down every effort to negotiate a partial nuclear test ban, much less a total ban with inspection. The President failed to say that the Soviets, for reasons best known to themselves, sud- denly instructed Ambassador Dobrynin to approach Secretary Rusk last May and gently make it known that Khrushshev was now in a generous mood and would like to negotiate a treaty. Despite this, the President said Friday there should be "constructive debate," and he hoped "all of you will take part in that debate, fOr r this treaty opportunity to extend its coy- erage to other nations and  is for all of us." later to all forms of nuclear "This debate," he added, tests." The treaty contains a possible pernicious trap, not readily per- ceivable. All countries have been invited to accept and sign the treaty. No doubt the Soviets will demand that East Germany be permitted to sign. All the signatories, therefore, would in effect be recognizing East Germany as an independ-" ent sovereign state, something the Administration has pledged itself not to do. The U.S. has given West Ger- many assurance it will keep East Germany from signing. The President painted a shocking picture of the terrify- ing results of a full.scale nu- clear war, but if it will not eliminate the danger of war, as he admitted, and if it does not guarantee even a limited ban on nuclear testing, one is led to wonder why all the hurry to have this treaty ratified. "will involve military, scien- tific and political experts. But it must not be left to them alone. The right and respon- sibility are yours." This is as it should be, but there are some slight difficul- ties. How can the voice of "all of us" be heard? As it is, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee this week held executive sessions with Herr|man and Rusk, which means secret sessions, and nothing will be divulged to the public at this time. Actual ratification hearings will then be heard for and against the proposed treaty. Since the military authori- ties have been "muzzled" ever since the Fulbright Memoran- dum and the consequent di- rective of Defense Secretary McNamara, will the military leaders feel free to state their views? seven.year-old boy took a bag of gumdrops [rom the dime store, and our live.year-old came home with a gun he had stolen from the home of a playmate. By and large they are good kids, but how do we help them and the younger chil. dren to learn honesty? HE young child rarely has any understanding of property or ownership. He knows there are certain things he is not sup- posed to touch, like the pointed scissors or the light socket. Beyond that, flowers are for picking, whether they be in his own back yard or a neighbor's garden, or the public park. And guns are for playing, whether it be the one he got for Christmas that is pretty well broken, or the shining black one at Johnny's house which he can have so much fun with. it's a good idea, repeatedly and calmly, to tell children not to take things that belong to another. But there is no point in punishing or scolding until he learns what "belonging" means, or until he develops a feeling of ownership for his own pos- sessions. When he misses one of his toys and feels a sense of loss, he begins to understand the meaning of MINE. He knows he wants to get it back. When Susie's doll is mislaid, or someone has walked off with part of her bead collection, the feeling of upset that she ex- periences is the beginning of understanding why Susie is troubled when things are taken from her dresser or Dad is displeased when Susie "finds" a quarter on his desk. When a young child takes someone else's property, he does it chiefly out of ignorance. His mistake is an important econ. sion, not for reproach or punishment, but for learning. One way to hurry the process is to give each child some thing or some place that is his own--be it a private drawer, or space in a chest, or just his very own book or toy. He can be led to understand that sharing these possessions is a good idea, but that they are clearly his to keep or dispose of. Aqe When He Can Distinguish T age five, six or seven, the child begins to distinguish right and wrong. Whenever stealing incidents come up, hs par- ents should properly show disapproval and possibly even impose some punishment. He needs the assurance that his parents believe he will learn to do right. Such incidents are mistakes, perhaps sins, but they are pass- ing acts. He should not be put beyond the pale and made to feel he is doomed to become a public enemy. The object taken must always be returned to its owner, quiet- ly, matter-of-factly, without great dramatics, long apologies or tears. If it is easier for the child to have Morn go along to the neighbor or school or store, this might be very wise. Thus the child learns that he cannot take, or keep, what belongs to others. His mother's willingness to go along with him to return the article assures him that he is still among those who are good and lovable. Should acts of stealing or pilfering recur repeatedly in an older child, then it is no longer just a problem of growing up and learning. Here, parents have to try to learn the causes. Stealing might be the outgrowth of the fact that his friends have more pocket money and can buy and do things that be eannoL An adjustment in his allowance, or providing him with ways to earn a little spending money may solve the problem. Other children steal to have money to treat their friendl, to Empress them, and in fact, buy their friendship. In this manner they can show off and feel important. In such a case the question comes up: Why does Joey ncqsd to feel important? Does he have feelings of inadequacy and fear? No amount of increased allowance or added possessions will solve the root problem here. Build Up His Confidence N this case you must try to find the source of his unhappiness and build up his confidence and feelings of self worth. Maybe he is having trouble with school work and cannot keep up with the class. Perhaps he feels that brother or sister is a favorite and he is being ignored. Maybe Dad has been especially busy, or Morn has been ill and nobody has taken the trouble to talk to him. Recognition, especially from his parents, provides him with success experiences that he needs naturally. Just an increase of attention, affection, some shared recreation or useful work might make the habit of stealing taper off and be forgotten. If the stealing gets more serious as the child gets older and common sense approaches don't curb it, a talk with a good coun- selor or child psychologist is indicated. Many boys and girls go through a phase of stealing for the sheer excitement and thrill of getting away with something. Drug- stores, dime stores and fruit stands are usually their targets. To snatch a comb or toy and run like mad for cover has pleasing elements of danger and rebellion. Here a little plain talk and some quick retribution will prob- ably hurry this phase to a close. Finally, don't panic; pilfering is another normal childhood experience that parents must live through. E A CHECK CE CHARGE ENTS NCE REQUIRED In 1938 Peoples Bank introduce| the first CheekMaster checking ac- counts west of the Mississippi. Their popularity surpassed our own ex- pectations and soon all nmjor banks in the area offexed similar sexces. Now, on the 25th Anniversary of CheckMaster in Seattle, and just prior to Peoples own 75th Anniversary (1964), we announce the elimination of the 25c monthly service charge on CheckMaster accounts. Effective August 1,1963, you pay only 10c per check. (Regular Checking Accounts available for businesa mad more active customers.) I"00PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK