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April 18, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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Vital News Through facilities of the N. O. W. C. Service The Progress pre- sents, in every issue, vital Cath- olic news and views from all the world. Your Friends Advertisers in this paper are your friends. Tell them you saw their  in The Progres They will appreciate the courtesy. Vol. 50, No. t5. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 194"/ : (Published Every Friday) $2.50 Per Year Foes of Freedom Education Hit NCEA Meeting Rights of Parents to Educate Their Children Must Be Defended Against Un-American Attacks Of Bigots, Archbishop Declares BOSTON, April 14.--"Stand firmly for freedom of educa- tion, for the rights of parents, the rights of the Church and the rights of the State" and condemn without fear "the monopolistic tendencies of education which many df the school profession and of school administration are promoting." This dual program was urged on Catholic educators by Arch- bishop John T. McNicholas, O.P., of Cincinnati, at the 44th annual meeting of the National Catholic Educational Association, here. " Insisting that the right of par- ents to choose the teachers of their children must not be infringed upon, Archbishop Richard J. Cushing of Boston, host to the con- vention, asserted: "We must never allow legislators or courts or anti-Catholic spellbinders of the moment to distract attention from the central place of the par- ent and the home in all demo- cratic and 'Christian educational theories." The three-day sessions, which ended Thursday, featured national- ly prominent speakers whodealt v;ith subjects ranging all the way from the implications of the United Nations Educational, Scien- tific and Cultural Organization for the N.C.E.A., down to whether reading or, arithmetic should be taught first in the primary grades. Secularist etuca;ors who raise a wall of separation between God and the child "are, in reality, fascist educators who, perhaps without realizing it, are planning to give our country millions of uncontrolled juvenile criminals," Archbishop McNich- olas told the 8,000 delegates. _. Archbishop McNicholas preached the sermon at the Solemn Pontifi- cal .Mass offered by Archbishop Cushing in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, which opened the con- vention. The Cincinnati prelate, who is president general of the N.C.E.A., stressed the supreme importance which the education of a child has for the individual, the family, the Church and the State. Lashing out against "secularist educators and those members of the school profession or adminis- tration who would take the child from its parents" and" insist upon the false assumption that parents have only those rights in educa- tion which the State grants them, Archbishop McNicholas reminded that there is "no power on earth" which can lawfully separate par- ents from their child in the field of education. "There is very un-American discrimination between par- ents," the Archbishop continued. "It is" taken for granted that rich parents shall have full lib- erty to educate their children in any school of their choice, or in any way they wish; but there is a growing tendency which would deprive poor or religious parents of freedom of educa- tion." Archbishop McNicholas empha- sized that the Church is not op- (Continued on Page 5) Navy Chaplain Drops DeadAt Kodiak Chapel KODIAK, Alaska, April 11- Navy Chaplain Father Joseph F. McCarthy, of San Francisco, dropped dead, Holy Saturday af- ternoon, at the door of his quon- set-hut Chapel, as he was enter- ing to hear confessions. He had not been complaining of ill health and just recently had his annual physical check-up. The chaplain's remains left on a small 1N-avy ship Wednesday for Seattle then on to his home, San Francisco. The Rev. Louis B. Fink, S. J., was called to the Navy base when Father McCarthy collapsed, and annointed the stricken priest con- ditionally. Father McCarthy is survived by a sister in San Francisco and by a brother, the Rev. Charles F. Mc- Carthy, M. M. of Maryknoll, N. Y. Ordained in 1931, Father Joseph McCarthy served in the Archdio- cese of Sac Francisco tmtil he entered the Navy. He was trans- ferred to Kodiak last June. Mission 'Rice Bank' In China Guards Catholic Marriage PINGNAM, China-- (NC)---It costs 200 pounds of rice to get married today in China reports the Rev. Russell Sprinkle of Middletown, Ohio, from this mar- ket town in the Maryknoll Wu- chow mission. Of this rice, 100 pounds goes to pay the wedding expenses, and the other half is given to the boy's xmily to pro- vide furniture for the newly-weds' home. Many of the Catholic people are too poor to raise the sum of this rice, and in order to prevent .mixed marriages the mission must act as a rice bank. 175 DESCENIANTS SURVIVE WOILN, 89, PARISH WORKER CHURCH POINT, ha., Mrs. Gloom Hangs Over Moscow Conference Difficult To Ascertain Russian People's Attitude Mr. G2R. Brunst, of the head- quarters staff of NCC News Service, whose dispatch from Moscow appears below, is the only correspondent exclusively representing a religious nevs service or religious newspaper officially accredited to report. events from within Soviet RUS- sia. ,He is one of only 36 news, photo and radio representatives from this country holding visas to cover the current sessions of the Council of Foreign Minis- ters. To his accounts of the peace deliberations Mr.. Brunst brings an understanding of the urgency of peace for Europe, gained throQgh personal observation of "ar-imposed havoc and human problems in the course of trav- els through the most devastated ceuntries of the Continent. By G. R. BRUNST (Staff Correspondent, NCWC News Service) MOSCOW, April 14.--(By Rad- io)--For obvious reasons it is dif-_ ficult to evaluate the attittlde o the Russian toward the vanish- ing prospects of the Moscow Con- ference producing a lasting, de- cent peace. That the Russians need peace i to recover from the deep wounds left by war becomes clear even to the casual observer of the (Continued qn Page 5) BISHOPS' BELIEF COLLECTION NEARS $5,000,000 GOAL Returns Show Dioceses More Than Doubling 1946 Offerings WASHINGTON, April 16 (NC) --Prospects are good for exceed- ing the $5,000,000 goal set for the Bishops' Relief Camp/ig, n for the Victims of War, taken up in most dioceses of the United States on Laetare Sunday. Bishop John Mark Cannon of Erie, treasurer, reported today on the preliminary returns from 21 dioceses, to t h e spring meeting of the Administra- tive Board of the National Cath- olic Welfare Conference here. Many individual dioceses h a v e more than doubled their 1946 con-i tributions, the Bishop said. i The 1946 collection raised $2,-i 790,000 for relief. The collection will be taken up in the Diocese of Seattle and in a number of other dioceses, later in the year. Hermogene':0livier active Parish! worker, who died at herhome in!OR TISO CONDEMNED suburbs here at the age of 89, I : is survived by 101 grandchildren 49 great-gTandchildren and 25 ;reat-great-grandchildren. official, Examination For Candidates For Seminary ANNOUNCEMENT of examination for candidates for the Seminary : Graduates of the eighth grade, high school and college students, who wish to enter St. Edward Seminary this fall will tke the entrance examination on Saturday, May 3, at 10:30 A. M., at the places listed below: SEATTLE: 0'Dec High School. TACOMA: St. Patrick Scimol. BELLINGHAM: Assumption School. YAKIMA: St. Paul School. In all other places, outside the cities previously mentioned where there is a parochial school, the examination will be he|d in the parochial school building on May 3-at 10:30 A. M. Where there is no parochial school in a town, the exam- ination will be held in the parish priest's house on May 3 at 10:30 A. M. This announcement shall be read at all public Masses on two successive Sundays following publication'. Likewise all teachers in our Catholic schools shall bring it to the atten- tion of the pupils. [ THE CHANCERY L April 18, 1947 By Order of the Most Reverend Bishop The Communist Conspiracy (Special Correspondent, NCWC News Service) BRATISLAVA, Slovakia, April 15.--(Radio)--The Rev. Dr. Jo- seph Tiso, war-time president of Slovakia, has been condemned to death by hanging by the People's Court here. The sentence was read in the court just four weeks after his long trial, in which two of his war-time ministers were co-defendants. One of the co-defendants, Fer- dinand Durcansky, former Slovak minister of foreign affairs, who was tried in absentia by the Bra- tislava Court, was also con- demned to the gallows. The court did not pronounce sentence in the case of the other co-defend- ant, Alexander Mach, former Sin- yak propaganda minister, who has been taken to a hospital because of a severe case of tuberculosis. Dr. Tiso was' the only defendant in the court room when the sen- tence was read. He listened to it in complete calm and composure. It is not known whether an appeal for clemency will be made. Admittance to the court room was restricted to people, with special cards which had been is- sued just recently. Among those present were the British and Russ- ian consuls. By Louis Francis Budenz The Greatest Expose 0f Communism Louis F. Budenz was managing editor of the communist Daft Worker for five years and a member of the.Communist Central Com- mittee in this country for six' years. He returned to the Catholic Church in October, 1945, and recently has been one of the most im- portant wtnesses to give testimony to Congressional committees in- vestigating communist adtivities in the United States. He is the author of the book "This Is My Story," written "in apology to all men and women of good will . . . for having failed so  long on my mat to see the way and the light." SOME days ago, a Catholic friend, visiting me, was surprised to note the large Marxist library I had accumulated during my communist days. Together we thumbed through the scores of volumes which contain the works of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and Stalin--and the numerous commentaries thereon. That the communists should study with such assiduity came as I document the biggest expose of a shock to him. "Many of them I cmmunism that was ever pub- study most zealously," I advised I lished." him, "often reading day and night I Naturally, I had to explain that and thereby acquiring that fana-/slatement more in detail. The ticism which resembles the fury of / (Continued on Page 5) Mchammed's followers. The trag- edy of it is that such study leads only to complete surrender of the, i intellect to the dictates of Mos- ! COW. I "What is the best work that i could be studied in turn to expose the communists, to learn of the true nature of communism?" he asked. The reply took him some- what aback. All Should Know "There are a number of works that should be knom thoroughly lo all palriotic Americans," was that reply. "But, the work above all that reveals the true nature of communism is the great message of Pins XI." I "You refer to the Encyclical! 'Divini Redemptoris' of i'Iarch 19, 1937/' he asked, "on Atheistic Communism ?" The Aim... "Before they (these articles) are over with, I shall Imve in- dicated pretty well how com- munism can be fought concrete- ly. "I find that Catholics are quite good, of course, in under- standing the general menace ot communism. They are rather naive, though, in detecting how communist propaganda is car- ried on and in ferreting out the deceit of the communists. "I hope, in this series, to show two big general th'ngs: (1) That this is a CONSPIR- ACY which has to be fought seriously and continuously and intelligently; (2) That the de- ceit of the communists has to be matched by Catholic alert- ness (and indeed patriotic American alertness) to how it operates. "The whole warfare on com- munism has' been too general and too remote." .. Excerpts from a letter by Mr. Budenz submitting the first articles in this series. I Cathofic Vets Plan State Department Meeting Thursday Will Discuss Convention Organization - Plans for a convention at Olym- pia to organize a Washington State Department will be the order of business for King County Chapter, Catholic War Veterans, meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24, in the Washington Athletic Club. The convention will .be held in June. Commander George O. Griffith of the King County Chapter will preside at the plazming session on Thursday next. Officers Installed Other county officers installed on Thursday, April 10, are: Chap- lain, ,Rev. drew F. Donohoe Frst Vice-Commander, George Hafertepe; Second Vice-Command- 'er, F. J. Werthmaun; Third Vice- Commander, Tom Keefe; Adjutant, Paul C. Carey; Treasurer, Charles J. Stacy; Judge Advocate, Frank J. Eberharter; Welfare Officer, John E. Slater; Historian, Janet Adams; Officer of the Day, Wil- liam F. Kinney; Medical Officer, Dr. Nicholas Sarro; and Trustees, Robbins M. Stocking and Everett E. Herron, Sr. The ritual team of the Fr. Vin- cent Post, Lewis Turner, post commander, and Rev. Thomas Manwaring, post chaplain, con- ducted the impressive installation. At the business meeting follow- hag the installation, Vernon Fla- herty of Fr. Vincent Post was elected County Trustee to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of former Trustee Edward J. Jor- Pastor of Texas Blast Town Gives Life For Victims Thirty-five Priests From Surrounding Area Rush to Disaster Scene To Administer To The Hundreds of Dying GALVESTON, Texas, April 17 -- Father William Roach, aged 38, pastor of devastated Texas City, sacrificed his life administering the last sacraments to the dying, yester- day. Disrdgarding the shouted warnings of guards, Father Roach rushed into the dock area to attend those injured in the first blast. He was fatally in- jured in the second explosion. His NEW BISHOP FOR I parked car was found later, about I fifty feet from the water's edge. MUNICH, WAS NAZI ' Talen to the Marine Hospital [ in Galveston, Father Roach re- ceived the last sacraments and PRISONER 4 YEARSI later. Funeral services, 'with Pontifical dan.. consecrators. - I Bishop-elect Neuhaeusler paid . '1 _ _i_ L*___ I his first visit to the United States LOUIS BUDENZ rrmu J ransJauon. [in 1926 when he attended the in- Jal.-mmm.,hmwn, J ternational Eucharistic Congress JIJL'4l4a'aaM. 6 lin Ceazo :'!he Bishop'S __L___ r'_ __12.----Isecond visit to America was in Pail.Ol' IIU %um|[llLI[i938 " " Imprisoned By Nazis REFUSEPOUTICAL , WASHINGTON ThefullLatin 1 Father Kunig pointed out that kTlflg/ DIIITY hi:gill text and a complete English trans- the Benedictines were enabled to ||||| l||.t-|t | IU|I| lation of the decree issued by the come to this country from Ger- | Sacred Congregation of the Sac- (Continued on Page 5) " raments empowering c e r t a i n MEXICANWOMBV MIDDLE VILLAGE, N. Y., April 16.--(NC) -- Bishop-elect John Baptist Neuhaeusler, who was recently appointed Auxil- iary of Mnlch, Germany, has twice visited the United States. He was especially fascinated by the American game of baseball and was impelled to try a hand at the sport himself. This was brought out by the Rev. Henry Kunig, pastor of St. Margaret's parish here and a cloe friend to the new Bishop, before: leaving for Germany to attend the l prelate's consecration on April 20. Bishop-elect Neuhaeusler will be consecrated in St. Michael's Church, Munich, by His Eminence Michael Cardinal yon Fauihaber, Archbishop of Munich and Freis- ing. Bishop Aloisius J. Muench of Fargo, Apostolic Visitator of Germany, will be one of the co- Requiem Mass for Father Roach will be held to,lay in St. Mary Cathedral, here. Bishop Byrne will officiate. Father Roach's body, ac- companied by his twin brother, Rev. John Roach of Houston, will be sent to his former home in Fittsburgh for burial. Alerted by the terrifm detona- tion, felt 150 miles away, more an 35 priests from surround- ing areas rushed to the disaster scene to render spiritual aid. Estimates of the dead ranged as high as 1,250, with more tha 1,000 known to be injured. Father M. A. Record of Hous- ton, who with other priests dug Luto the wreckage to reach the dying, reported to relief workers who ci'ne upon the scene: "There are hundreds of bodies still to be found." The catastrophe started Wed- nesday morning, with fire followed by explosion aboard the French ship Grand Camp, reported to be I%EX/CO CITY, D. F.--Efforts to weld women, who are organized into 32 national groups, into the Mexican politica! party system I were rejected at a Congress of the women's organizations held here. The women declared that they did not intend to be exploited at party meetings where when electoral groups were chosen, their particu- lar problems would be ignored. Since women were granted the right to vote, all parties have made attempts to gain leadership of the women's groups. Rumors were quickly scotched as to the forma- tion of a Women's Catholic Party, but the communists and the PRI (government) party continued their work. In refusing affiliation with any central political organization, the Congress listed as the women's oh- jectives: mobilization of all women "That is it," I responded. "There lwho may vote in municipal elec- is nothing which gives more ac-ltions; the fight against the black [U=r" HANG REUEIVES curately and thoroughly the char-Imarket, inflation and the hoarding acteristics and inner workings of l of merchandise; social betterment; the communist conspiracy against increased industrialization; the PllUlVl Christian civilization. It is not an. building of low-priced hygienic VERdiCT UL|HL|lexaggeration to call Pins XI'shomes, and maternal aid. .y ,0000.NER Aberdeen Catholic Vets' ABERDEEN, April 14.--Members of St. Mary Post, Catholic War Veterans, were presented post colors Wednesday'last, at a public ceremony spon- sored jointly by the post and the Bishop O'Dea As- sembly, fourth degree X(nlghts of Co!bus. Left to right are John P. Whalen, faithful navl- priests to confer the Sacrament of Confirmation on persons in danger of death is carried in the current issue of The American Ecclesiastical Review, published here. Mexico Restores .Church In San Luis Potosi To Catholics MEXICO CITY, D. F.--(NC)-- President Aleman of Mexico has signed a decree restoring St. Helen's Church in Rio Verde, San Luis de Potosi, to Catholic wor- ship. The church had been asstgned to the use of the Agricultural De- partment of Mexico in the admin- istration of President azaro Cardenas. The decree, an unus- ual departure from the policy of previous administration, declares that restoration of the Church is justified by the needs of the large number of Catholics in Rio Verde. Post Receives Colors gator of the Assembly, who entrusted the American flag to the post and presented the colors; Chaplain Philip Rodgers of Fort Lewis; Rev. Father Leonard Rafalowski, post chaplain, and Commander Thomas Craig. Citric and eterans' representatives took part in the program. Catholics Escape In Oklahoma Tornado, Church Is Wrecked OKLAHOMA CITY, April 15.-- (NC)--The death-dealing tornado that snuffed out 85 lives and in- jured 1,000 persons in Woodward, Okla., spared the Catholic. popula- tion of 100, families. Only seven were injured, none seriously. St. Peter Church was totally toaded with nitrates, spread fire quickly to the Monsanto chemical plant and then to other large in dustrial plants and oil tanks. . St. Mary Chursh, of which Fath- er Roach wax pastor, had its wi-- .... dows bro[en and its doors dama- aged by the concussion, which shattered windows of buildings 25 miles away. Father William Roach was born " in Philadelphia, August 5, 1908. With his twin brother Rev. John Roach, director of Catholic char- ities for the Galveston Diocese, he came to Texas to study at La Porte Seminary. 30,000 Czech Catholics March In Procession PRESOV, Czechoslovakia, April 14 -- (NC) -- Biggest Catholic procession in local living memory was the culminating feature of the Catholic missions at Presov in Eastern Slovakia, when more than 30,000 Catholics passed through the streets of Presov with mis- sionary crucifixes. Australian Priest For destroyed and the close-by rectory ! . ..... damaged beyond repair. The pas- [ Leper olony haplaincy tor, the Rev. Joseph McGurk, [ TOWNSVILLE, Australia -- was absent from the city but the[ (NC)-Fides)--The Rev. A. B. For- assistant, the Rev. James RosS,[ster, who has been engaged in escaped inju/T. [parish work in Railway Estate, The United Brethren Church[Queensland, has been accepted a,s across the street also was de-I chaplain for work among the le- stroyed. Father Ross was the  pers of Fantome Island. first to arrive on the scene and He volunteered for the duty, rescued eleven persons from the lBishop Hugh E. Ryan of Towns- wreckage before  help arrived, ville has announced. Previous to Father Ross spent the night a- his work in Australia, Father mong the city s ruins and baptized Forster had been engaged in mis- four dying persons, sionary work in Palestine. 8,000 In Notre Dame Cathedral Stand And Applaud As Priest Re00utes Charges Made By Reds ARIS--- (NC)--Exploitation by a section of the press of what is , called the "conspiracy of the cas- *socks" has occasioned an excep- tional manifestation in the Cathe- dral of Notre Dame. Concluding his sermon before a congregation of some ,8,000 the Jesuit preacher, Father Michel Ri- quet, who had previously ad- dressed a letter of protest to the President of the Council concern- ing the arrest of several priests accused of collaboration, said: "If we are not of the 'party of the executed' (this name has been applied by the communists to them- selves because of their members who fell-among the 75,000 French- man executed by the Nazis), we have been for 2,000 years the 'par- ty of the martyrs,':' Father Riquet said. "As to these calumnies, which the holfness of this plgce prevents me from repeating and which come from elements hardened ,by anti- clericalism before the war, we re-lBiahop spond that nothing will prevent our cassocks, still red vith the ,blood of the executioners, from looking to the future of social progress as sons of the Christian tradition. To the hate that now surrounds and envelops us, we re- spond once more with love." As Father Riquet concluded these words, the congregation stood and, notwithstanding the sanctity of the cathedral, broke into prolonged applause. NOthing like this has taken place in otre Dame since 1914 when Father Jan- vier spoke from the pulpit of the victory of the Marne. NOTICE ASTORS wishing to use Semi- narians for vacation school or census work, notify Chancery im- mediately. THE CHANCERY By Order of the Most Reverend Vital News Through facilities of the N. O. W. C. Service The Progress pre- sents, in every issue, vital Cath- olic news and views from all the world. Your Friends Advertisers in this paper are your friends. Tell them you saw their  in The Progres They will appreciate the courtesy. Vol. 50, No. t5. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 194"/ : (Published Every Friday) $2.50 Per Year Foes of Freedom Education Hit NCEA Meeting Rights of Parents to Educate Their Children Must Be Defended Against Un-American Attacks Of Bigots, Archbishop Declares BOSTON, April 14.--"Stand firmly for freedom of educa- tion, for the rights of parents, the rights of the Church and the rights of the State" and condemn without fear "the monopolistic tendencies of education which many df the school profession and of school administration are promoting." This dual program was urged on Catholic educators by Arch- bishop John T. McNicholas, O.P., of Cincinnati, at the 44th annual meeting of the National Catholic Educational Association, here. " Insisting that the right of par- ents to choose the teachers of their children must not be infringed upon, Archbishop Richard J. Cushing of Boston, host to the con- vention, asserted: "We must never allow legislators or courts or anti-Catholic spellbinders of the moment to distract attention from the central place of the par- ent and the home in all demo- cratic and 'Christian educational theories." The three-day sessions, which ended Thursday, featured national- ly prominent speakers whodealt v;ith subjects ranging all the way from the implications of the United Nations Educational, Scien- tific and Cultural Organization for the N.C.E.A., down to whether reading or, arithmetic should be taught first in the primary grades. Secularist etuca;ors who raise a wall of separation between God and the child "are, in reality, fascist educators who, perhaps without realizing it, are planning to give our country millions of uncontrolled juvenile criminals," Archbishop McNich- olas told the 8,000 delegates. _. Archbishop McNicholas preached the sermon at the Solemn Pontifi- cal .Mass offered by Archbishop Cushing in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, which opened the con- vention. The Cincinnati prelate, who is president general of the N.C.E.A., stressed the supreme importance which the education of a child has for the individual, the family, the Church and the State. Lashing out against "secularist educators and those members of the school profession or adminis- tration who would take the child from its parents" and" insist upon the false assumption that parents have only those rights in educa- tion which the State grants them, Archbishop McNicholas reminded that there is "no power on earth" which can lawfully separate par- ents from their child in the field of education. "There is very un-American discrimination between par- ents," the Archbishop continued. "It is" taken for granted that rich parents shall have full lib- erty to educate their children in any school of their choice, or in any way they wish; but there is a growing tendency which would deprive poor or religious parents of freedom of educa- tion." Archbishop McNicholas empha- sized that the Church is not op- (Continued on Page 5) Navy Chaplain Drops DeadAt Kodiak Chapel KODIAK, Alaska, April 11- Navy Chaplain Father Joseph F. McCarthy, of San Francisco, dropped dead, Holy Saturday af- ternoon, at the door of his quon- set-hut Chapel, as he was enter- ing to hear confessions. He had not been complaining of ill health and just recently had his annual physical check-up. The chaplain's remains left on a small 1N-avy ship Wednesday for Seattle then on to his home, San Francisco. The Rev. Louis B. Fink, S. J., was called to the Navy base when Father McCarthy collapsed, and annointed the stricken priest con- ditionally. Father McCarthy is survived by a sister in San Francisco and by a brother, the Rev. Charles F. Mc- Carthy, M. M. of Maryknoll, N. Y. Ordained in 1931, Father Joseph McCarthy served in the Archdio- cese of Sac Francisco tmtil he entered the Navy. He was trans- ferred to Kodiak last June. Mission 'Rice Bank' In China Guards Catholic Marriage PINGNAM, China-- (NC)---It costs 200 pounds of rice to get married today in China reports the Rev. Russell Sprinkle of Middletown, Ohio, from this mar- ket town in the Maryknoll Wu- chow mission. Of this rice, 100 pounds goes to pay the wedding expenses, and the other half is given to the boy's xmily to pro- vide furniture for the newly-weds' home. Many of the Catholic people are too poor to raise the sum of this rice, and in order to prevent .mixed marriages the mission must act as a rice bank. 175 DESCENIANTS SURVIVE WOILN, 89, PARISH WORKER CHURCH POINT, ha., Mrs. Gloom Hangs Over Moscow Conference Difficult To Ascertain Russian People's Attitude Mr. G2R. Brunst, of the head- quarters staff of NCC News Service, whose dispatch from Moscow appears below, is the only correspondent exclusively representing a religious nevs service or religious newspaper officially accredited to report. events from within Soviet RUS- sia. ,He is one of only 36 news, photo and radio representatives from this country holding visas to cover the current sessions of the Council of Foreign Minis- ters. To his accounts of the peace deliberations Mr.. Brunst brings an understanding of the urgency of peace for Europe, gained throQgh personal observation of "ar-imposed havoc and human problems in the course of trav- els through the most devastated ceuntries of the Continent. By G. R. BRUNST (Staff Correspondent, NCWC News Service) MOSCOW, April 14.--(By Rad- io)--For obvious reasons it is dif-_ ficult to evaluate the attittlde o the Russian toward the vanish- ing prospects of the Moscow Con- ference producing a lasting, de- cent peace. That the Russians need peace i to recover from the deep wounds left by war becomes clear even to the casual observer of the (Continued qn Page 5) BISHOPS' BELIEF COLLECTION NEARS $5,000,000 GOAL Returns Show Dioceses More Than Doubling 1946 Offerings WASHINGTON, April 16 (NC) --Prospects are good for exceed- ing the $5,000,000 goal set for the Bishops' Relief Camp/ig, n for the Victims of War, taken up in most dioceses of the United States on Laetare Sunday. Bishop John Mark Cannon of Erie, treasurer, reported today on the preliminary returns from 21 dioceses, to t h e spring meeting of the Administra- tive Board of the National Cath- olic Welfare Conference here. Many individual dioceses h a v e more than doubled their 1946 con-i tributions, the Bishop said. i The 1946 collection raised $2,-i 790,000 for relief. The collection will be taken up in the Diocese of Seattle and in a number of other dioceses, later in the year. Hermogene':0livier active Parish! worker, who died at herhome in!OR TISO CONDEMNED suburbs here at the age of 89, I : is survived by 101 grandchildren 49 great-gTandchildren and 25 ;reat-great-grandchildren. official, Examination For Candidates For Seminary ANNOUNCEMENT of examination for candidates for the Seminary : Graduates of the eighth grade, high school and college students, who wish to enter St. Edward Seminary this fall will tke the entrance examination on Saturday, May 3, at 10:30 A. M., at the places listed below: SEATTLE: 0'Dec High School. TACOMA: St. Patrick Scimol. BELLINGHAM: Assumption School. YAKIMA: St. Paul School. In all other places, outside the cities previously mentioned where there is a parochial school, the examination will be he|d in the parochial school building on May 3-at 10:30 A. M. Where there is no parochial school in a town, the exam- ination will be held in the parish priest's house on May 3 at 10:30 A. M. This announcement shall be read at all public Masses on two successive Sundays following publication'. Likewise all teachers in our Catholic schools shall bring it to the atten- tion of the pupils. [ THE CHANCERY L April 18, 1947 By Order of the Most Reverend Bishop The Communist Conspiracy (Special Correspondent, NCWC News Service) BRATISLAVA, Slovakia, April 15.--(Radio)--The Rev. Dr. Jo- seph Tiso, war-time president of Slovakia, has been condemned to death by hanging by the People's Court here. The sentence was read in the court just four weeks after his long trial, in which two of his war-time ministers were co-defendants. One of the co-defendants, Fer- dinand Durcansky, former Slovak minister of foreign affairs, who was tried in absentia by the Bra- tislava Court, was also con- demned to the gallows. The court did not pronounce sentence in the case of the other co-defend- ant, Alexander Mach, former Sin- yak propaganda minister, who has been taken to a hospital because of a severe case of tuberculosis. Dr. Tiso was' the only defendant in the court room when the sen- tence was read. He listened to it in complete calm and composure. It is not known whether an appeal for clemency will be made. Admittance to the court room was restricted to people, with special cards which had been is- sued just recently. Among those present were the British and Russ- ian consuls. By Louis Francis Budenz The Greatest Expose 0f Communism Louis F. Budenz was managing editor of the communist Daft Worker for five years and a member of the.Communist Central Com- mittee in this country for six' years. He returned to the Catholic Church in October, 1945, and recently has been one of the most im- portant wtnesses to give testimony to Congressional committees in- vestigating communist adtivities in the United States. He is the author of the book "This Is My Story," written "in apology to all men and women of good will . . . for having failed so  long on my mat to see the way and the light." SOME days ago, a Catholic friend, visiting me, was surprised to note the large Marxist library I had accumulated during my communist days. Together we thumbed through the scores of volumes which contain the works of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and Stalin--and the numerous commentaries thereon. That the communists should study with such assiduity came as I document the biggest expose of a shock to him. "Many of them I cmmunism that was ever pub- study most zealously," I advised I lished." him, "often reading day and night I Naturally, I had to explain that and thereby acquiring that fana-/slatement more in detail. The ticism which resembles the fury of / (Continued on Page 5) Mchammed's followers. The trag- edy of it is that such study leads only to complete surrender of the, i intellect to the dictates of Mos- ! COW. I "What is the best work that i could be studied in turn to expose the communists, to learn of the true nature of communism?" he asked. The reply took him some- what aback. All Should Know "There are a number of works that should be knom thoroughly lo all palriotic Americans," was that reply. "But, the work above all that reveals the true nature of communism is the great message of Pins XI." I "You refer to the Encyclical! 'Divini Redemptoris' of i'Iarch 19, 1937/' he asked, "on Atheistic Communism ?" The Aim... "Before they (these articles) are over with, I shall Imve in- dicated pretty well how com- munism can be fought concrete- ly. "I find that Catholics are quite good, of course, in under- standing the general menace ot communism. They are rather naive, though, in detecting how communist propaganda is car- ried on and in ferreting out the deceit of the communists. "I hope, in this series, to show two big general th'ngs: (1) That this is a CONSPIR- ACY which has to be fought seriously and continuously and intelligently; (2) That the de- ceit of the communists has to be matched by Catholic alert- ness (and indeed patriotic American alertness) to how it operates. "The whole warfare on com- munism has' been too general and too remote." .. Excerpts from a letter by Mr. Budenz submitting the first articles in this series. I Cathofic Vets Plan State Department Meeting Thursday Will Discuss Convention Organization - Plans for a convention at Olym- pia to organize a Washington State Department will be the order of business for King County Chapter, Catholic War Veterans, meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24, in the Washington Athletic Club. The convention will .be held in June. Commander George O. Griffith of the King County Chapter will preside at the plazming session on Thursday next. Officers Installed Other county officers installed on Thursday, April 10, are: Chap- lain, ,Rev. drew F. Donohoe Frst Vice-Commander, George Hafertepe; Second Vice-Command- 'er, F. J. Werthmaun; Third Vice- Commander, Tom Keefe; Adjutant, Paul C. Carey; Treasurer, Charles J. Stacy; Judge Advocate, Frank J. Eberharter; Welfare Officer, John E. Slater; Historian, Janet Adams; Officer of the Day, Wil- liam F. Kinney; Medical Officer, Dr. Nicholas Sarro; and Trustees, Robbins M. Stocking and Everett E. Herron, Sr. The ritual team of the Fr. Vin- cent Post, Lewis Turner, post commander, and Rev. Thomas Manwaring, post chaplain, con- ducted the impressive installation. At the business meeting follow- hag the installation, Vernon Fla- herty of Fr. Vincent Post was elected County Trustee to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of former Trustee Edward J. Jor- Pastor of Texas Blast Town Gives Life For Victims Thirty-five Priests From Surrounding Area Rush to Disaster Scene To Administer To The Hundreds of Dying GALVESTON, Texas, April 17 -- Father William Roach, aged 38, pastor of devastated Texas City, sacrificed his life administering the last sacraments to the dying, yester- day. Disrdgarding the shouted warnings of guards, Father Roach rushed into the dock area to attend those injured in the first blast. He was fatally in- jured in the second explosion. His NEW BISHOP FOR I parked car was found later, about I fifty feet from the water's edge. MUNICH, WAS NAZI ' Talen to the Marine Hospital [ in Galveston, Father Roach re- ceived the last sacraments and PRISONER 4 YEARSI later. Funeral services, 'with Pontifical dan.. consecrators. - I Bishop-elect Neuhaeusler paid . '1 _ _i_ L*___ I his first visit to the United States LOUIS BUDENZ rrmu J ransJauon. [in 1926 when he attended the in- Jal.-mmm.,hmwn, J ternational Eucharistic Congress JIJL'4l4a'aaM. 6 lin Ceazo :'!he Bishop'S __L___ r'_ __12.----Isecond visit to America was in Pail.Ol' IIU %um|[llLI[i938 " " Imprisoned By Nazis REFUSEPOUTICAL , WASHINGTON ThefullLatin 1 Father Kunig pointed out that kTlflg/ DIIITY hi:gill text and a complete English trans- the Benedictines were enabled to ||||| l||.t-|t | IU|I| lation of the decree issued by the come to this country from Ger- | Sacred Congregation of the Sac- (Continued on Page 5) " raments empowering c e r t a i n MEXICANWOMBV MIDDLE VILLAGE, N. Y., April 16.--(NC) -- Bishop-elect John Baptist Neuhaeusler, who was recently appointed Auxil- iary of Mnlch, Germany, has twice visited the United States. He was especially fascinated by the American game of baseball and was impelled to try a hand at the sport himself. This was brought out by the Rev. Henry Kunig, pastor of St. Margaret's parish here and a cloe friend to the new Bishop, before: leaving for Germany to attend the l prelate's consecration on April 20. Bishop-elect Neuhaeusler will be consecrated in St. Michael's Church, Munich, by His Eminence Michael Cardinal yon Fauihaber, Archbishop of Munich and Freis- ing. Bishop Aloisius J. Muench of Fargo, Apostolic Visitator of Germany, will be one of the co- Requiem Mass for Father Roach will be held to,lay in St. Mary Cathedral, here. Bishop Byrne will officiate. Father Roach's body, ac- companied by his twin brother, Rev. John Roach of Houston, will be sent to his former home in Fittsburgh for burial. Alerted by the terrifm detona- tion, felt 150 miles away, more an 35 priests from surround- ing areas rushed to the disaster scene to render spiritual aid. Estimates of the dead ranged as high as 1,250, with more tha 1,000 known to be injured. Father M. A. Record of Hous- ton, who with other priests dug Luto the wreckage to reach the dying, reported to relief workers who ci'ne upon the scene: "There are hundreds of bodies still to be found." The catastrophe started Wed- nesday morning, with fire followed by explosion aboard the French ship Grand Camp, reported to be I%EX/CO CITY, D. F.--Efforts to weld women, who are organized into 32 national groups, into the Mexican politica! party system I were rejected at a Congress of the women's organizations held here. The women declared that they did not intend to be exploited at party meetings where when electoral groups were chosen, their particu- lar problems would be ignored. Since women were granted the right to vote, all parties have made attempts to gain leadership of the women's groups. Rumors were quickly scotched as to the forma- tion of a Women's Catholic Party, but the communists and the PRI (government) party continued their work. In refusing affiliation with any central political organization, the Congress listed as the women's oh- jectives: mobilization of all women "That is it," I responded. "There lwho may vote in municipal elec- is nothing which gives more ac-ltions; the fight against the black [U=r" HANG REUEIVES curately and thoroughly the char-Imarket, inflation and the hoarding acteristics and inner workings of l of merchandise; social betterment; the communist conspiracy against increased industrialization; the PllUlVl Christian civilization. It is not an. building of low-priced hygienic VERdiCT UL|HL|lexaggeration to call Pins XI'shomes, and maternal aid. .y ,0000.NER Aberdeen Catholic Vets' ABERDEEN, April 14.--Members of St. Mary Post, Catholic War Veterans, were presented post colors Wednesday'last, at a public ceremony spon- sored jointly by the post and the Bishop O'Dea As- sembly, fourth degree X(nlghts of Co!bus. Left to right are John P. Whalen, faithful navl- priests to confer the Sacrament of Confirmation on persons in danger of death is carried in the current issue of The American Ecclesiastical Review, published here. Mexico Restores .Church In San Luis Potosi To Catholics MEXICO CITY, D. F.--(NC)-- President Aleman of Mexico has signed a decree restoring St. Helen's Church in Rio Verde, San Luis de Potosi, to Catholic wor- ship. The church had been asstgned to the use of the Agricultural De- partment of Mexico in the admin- istration of President azaro Cardenas. The decree, an unus- ual departure from the policy of previous administration, declares that restoration of the Church is justified by the needs of the large number of Catholics in Rio Verde. Post Receives Colors gator of the Assembly, who entrusted the American flag to the post and presented the colors; Chaplain Philip Rodgers of Fort Lewis; Rev. Father Leonard Rafalowski, post chaplain, and Commander Thomas Craig. Citric and eterans' representatives took part in the program. Catholics Escape In Oklahoma Tornado, Church Is Wrecked OKLAHOMA CITY, April 15.-- (NC)--The death-dealing tornado that snuffed out 85 lives and in- jured 1,000 persons in Woodward, Okla., spared the Catholic. popula- tion of 100, families. Only seven were injured, none seriously. St. Peter Church was totally toaded with nitrates, spread fire quickly to the Monsanto chemical plant and then to other large in dustrial plants and oil tanks. . St. Mary Chursh, of which Fath- er Roach wax pastor, had its wi-- .... dows bro[en and its doors dama- aged by the concussion, which shattered windows of buildings 25 miles away. Father William Roach was born " in Philadelphia, August 5, 1908. With his twin brother Rev. John Roach, director of Catholic char- ities for the Galveston Diocese, he came to Texas to study at La Porte Seminary. 30,000 Czech Catholics March In Procession PRESOV, Czechoslovakia, April 14 -- (NC) -- Biggest Catholic procession in local living memory was the culminating feature of the Catholic missions at Presov in Eastern Slovakia, when more than 30,000 Catholics passed through the streets of Presov with mis- sionary crucifixes. Australian Priest For destroyed and the close-by rectory ! . ..... damaged beyond repair. The pas- [ Leper olony haplaincy tor, the Rev. Joseph McGurk, [ TOWNSVILLE, Australia -- was absent from the city but the[ (NC)-Fides)--The Rev. A. B. For- assistant, the Rev. James RosS,[ster, who has been engaged in escaped inju/T. [parish work in Railway Estate, The United Brethren Church[Queensland, has been accepted a,s across the street also was de-I chaplain for work among the le- stroyed. Father Ross was the  pers of Fantome Island. first to arrive on the scene and He volunteered for the duty, rescued eleven persons from the lBishop Hugh E. Ryan of Towns- wreckage before  help arrived, ville has announced. Previous to Father Ross spent the night a- his work in Australia, Father mong the city s ruins and baptized Forster had been engaged in mis- four dying persons, sionary work in Palestine. 8,000 In Notre Dame Cathedral Stand And Applaud As Priest Re00utes Charges Made By Reds ARIS--- (NC)--Exploitation by a section of the press of what is , called the "conspiracy of the cas- *socks" has occasioned an excep- tional manifestation in the Cathe- dral of Notre Dame. Concluding his sermon before a congregation of some ,8,000 the Jesuit preacher, Father Michel Ri- quet, who had previously ad- dressed a letter of protest to the President of the Council concern- ing the arrest of several priests accused of collaboration, said: "If we are not of the 'party of the executed' (this name has been applied by the communists to them- selves because of their members who fell-among the 75,000 French- man executed by the Nazis), we have been for 2,000 years the 'par- ty of the martyrs,':' Father Riquet said. "As to these calumnies, which the holfness of this plgce prevents me from repeating and which come from elements hardened ,by anti- clericalism before the war, we re-lBiahop spond that nothing will prevent our cassocks, still red vith the ,blood of the executioners, from looking to the future of social progress as sons of the Christian tradition. To the hate that now surrounds and envelops us, we re- spond once more with love." As Father Riquet concluded these words, the congregation stood and, notwithstanding the sanctity of the cathedral, broke into prolonged applause. NOthing like this has taken place in otre Dame since 1914 when Father Jan- vier spoke from the pulpit of the victory of the Marne. NOTICE ASTORS wishing to use Semi- narians for vacation school or census work, notify Chancery im- mediately. THE CHANCERY By Order of the Most Reverend