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April 18, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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Page Four - -" (3ATHOEIC nORTHWEST PROGRESS $, " Telephone MAin 8880 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle (4) Entered as Second-Class Matter at the Postoffice at Seattle February 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 WILJ_ffAM P. O&apos;0ONNELL REV. ANDREW PROUTY Managing Editor Editor Published by the Northwest Progress Co. President, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M., ST,DI Bishop of Seattle The Catholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function as the official newspaper of our diocese. It is a necessary channel of information and instruction and a bond of union- The Catholic newspaper supports and de- fends the honIe, the school and the Church. Our diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it should have, as indeed it has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every priest. x 00om00uo,,t, e i" Be U N THERE is no use denying that the American policy of anti _-communist intervention in Greece and Turkey had pro- found repercussion on the U.N. Contrary to prevalent opin- ion, however, the crisis at Lake Success is not so much caused by the alleged "by-passing" of U.N. by President Truman, as by the sudden reali- zation- that in its present setup tiIe U.N;" is fully incapable of resolving serious" international problems. :W h a t the - American action aclfieved, was merely to bare the basic weaknesses and evils in the foundations of : the organization. It showed that due to the privi- ged position held by Russia and her satellites in the organiza- tion, end U.N. action against the communist plot for world revolu- ti0n. can always be successfully blocked or nullified. Mr. Gromy- ko's and his friends' reaction to Prident Truman's step proved beyond doubt, that in fact only action outside of U.N. can at the present stage stop communist aggression. Thus tt seems, that the pologetic attitude assumed by 0ffleial circles in Washington in rcaetion to U.N. criticism of American decisions was not the answer; what is indicated is a determined demand for drastic reforms within U.N., so that its work could be trnsteL • This is in fact what many U.N. officials and members of delega- tions antieilted, especially those connected with the communist satellite regimes. A real panic krnong them was their reaction to the new line taken by the United States toward Commu- nism. Some of the satellite offi- cials openly confessed, that hard times are ahead of them now that "the United States has turned fascist" The Secretary General :Mr. Trygvie :Lie is quite embarrassed by the vulgar disregard for ob- ligations of impartiality shown by the Red packed Secretariat of .the U.N. Commission in Greece. What this writer reported three weeks ago about the work of the Commission was only too well confirmed by later press dis- patches. Now the scandal has be- tome' too great and too danger- ous for U.N. to conceal Mr. Lie decided to send his own representative to Europe to investigate the matter on the spot. He was-forced to do • so, since the scandal was en- courgging violent criticism that U.N. Is a red pernmM body, where the will of the non-com- munist majority is lmlyzed by the communist minority. In fact this is quite a legitimate assertion. As the situation stands today, the problem has evolved from American alleged 'q)y-passing , of the-issue itself with U.N. Mr. Gromyko and his faithful satel- IRes are trying to shift the dis- cussion from U.N. control over comml]tnist aggression in Greece toU.N, control over American help to that country. The Soviet delegate knQws of course that Is motion has no chance of win- e majority, but, while ac- cusing the United States for dis- regard for the U.N., he is doing his best to stymie all action and thus to prove that U.N. really cannot do much beyond mere debating. This is not surprising. As a matter of fact, journalists listen- lng to debates at Lake Success have become ather cynical. They have little illusions left concern- lng the prospects of changing viet role in the U.N. VVlmt was surprising indeed, l)wever, was the reaction with which certain segments of Ameri- can ,public opinion greeted Mr. Gromyko's speech d i r e e t e d agalrmt President Truman's pol- icy. Possibly encouraged by Washington's apologetic mood, they hailed Mr. Gromyko almost as a hero. While the Soviet dele- gate was launching on American soil an attache on United States foreign policy and used the U.N. as a rostrum to appeal in English to Anericans against their g0v- ernment, the New York Times published a picture of a beaming Mr. Gromyko shaking hands with West Point cadets who happened to be present at the meeting as spectators. And a poll was or- ganized by The Times among peo- ple in the gallery with the ef- fect that 20 out of 25 persons de- clared themselves for Mr. Gro- myko and against the United States policy. Was it not too much ? The possibility is, that what still is an opportunity to intro- duce essential reforms in the U.N. may turn into a face saving and a communist saving solution- What the Greek crisis has proved and will continue to prove is that as long as Russia controls within the U.N. nu- merous satellite and communist officials, no effectiv and re- liable work can be performed by the organization. The Soviet Union will use her network in the U.N. either to reach her own objectives, or if she fails, to make it useless and fluay wreck it. Courageous revision of some of the basic principles on which the organization is founded, now, can save U.N. The vote power should be abolished. Synthetic delegates of synthetic communist regimes, such as of Yugoslavia, Czecho- slovakia and Poland should be asked out. There should be no roam for faked representation at conference tables where legiti- mat e delegates of sovereign states are seated. And, following the example of recent decisions in Washington, a thorough house cleaning of communists should be instituted also at Lake Success. Mr. Lie candidly admitted in his press conference, that he makes no distinction between Communists and non-CMmmu- ulsts in his staff, as long as they are good workers. The American Delegation and Mr. Byron Price, the American As- sistant Secretary General of U.N. should perhaps educate Mr. Lie that Communists know only one loyalty, that for the FEAST Sunday, April 20.--St. Marcellinus, Bmhop, was bornin Africa of a noble family. Accompanied by Vin- cent and Dominus he went over into Gaul and preached the Gospel with great success. Many miracles are mentioned as having occurred at his tomb. He died at Embrun about 374. Monday, April 21. -- St. Anselm, _Axchbishop of Canterbury. His episcopate was a constant struggle with Kings William Rufus and Henry I, chiefly over the question of investitures. He introduced the Feast of the Imaculate Concep- tion ill the West. He died in 1109. Tuesday, .April 22.---St. Soterus Pope, Martyr, was raised to the Ci3air of Peter on the death of St. Anicetus in 175. He governed the Church until the year 182 and was distinguished for his alms-giving and for his opposltion to the her- esy of Montanus. From Page To Martyr ONE torrid morning in 1687 • a horse - drawn vehicle passed through a gate in the walls of Evora, a city in the heart of Alemtejo south of Lisbon. Its principal occupant was a traveler, dressed in black cas- sock and clerical hat, who had recently returned to Portugal after 13 years in the Orient. He was now on his way north to Portlegre to see his mother. He would also visit Lisbon to renew acquaintance with his boyhood companion, Prince Pedro, now  reigning as King Pedro II. Much had happened to John de Britto, the son of a former Vice- roy of Brazil, since he had served as page in the court of King John IV. He had left the court to enter the Jesuit novitiate and some years later, on March 15, 1673, had set out on his perilous journey to the famous Jesuit mission at Madura in the extreme south of India. The ship had safe- ly run the gantlet of Moorish pirates off the northwest coast of Africa, only to be becalmed in .the Gulf of Guinea and to en- counter a whirlpool off the Cape 'of Good Hope. Six months out of Lisbon, it reached Goa. With one companion, and traveling from Goa on foot, the young mission- cry had crossed the Gahts and finally reached his destination in July, 1674. King Pedro II did :not. wish his old friend to return to India. He tried to persuade him to remain at court as private tutor to the future John V. He also suggested that the Jesuit missionary serve as plomatic representative of :Portugal at the Papal Court in Rome. W?nen neither of these posts was accepted by Father de Britto,_ the King insisted that if he must return to India then he should go as Archbishop of Cranganore. But it was back to the Madura mission that John de Britto returned in 1690---re- turned to win a martyrs crown< Four years later the news of Father de Britto's death reached Lisbon. A year earlier--so slowly did news travel in those days-- the jeweled scimitar of the state executioner of a Marava prince had severed the missionary's bowed head from his kneeling body. A messenger from the royal palace in Lisbon carried the news to the martyr's mother in Porta legre and summoned her to court. Donna Beatrice did not put on mourning, but dressed as for a wedding feast. At court she was shown every honor as the mother of a martyr for the Faith the protomartyr of Madura. Two centuries later, John de Britto vas beatified by Pope Pins IX. Great Thoughts From the Psalms God Our Strength l love Thee, O Lord, Thou art my strength. Thou art, 0 Lord, my rock, my citadel, my Saviour. I shall invoke the Lord who is worthy, of all praise, And I shall be rescued from my enemies. To Thee, O Lord, do I hasten. Nev- er let me be brought to confu- sion. Whom shall I fear, for the Lord is my light and my salvation ? Before whom shall I tremble, for the Lord is my life's fortress ? f hostile camps rise up to attack me, My heart shall hold no fear. If war should break out against me, I shall be confident. Thou art my stronghold, a tower of strength against the enemy. Selections taken from Psalms 17, 30, 60 Soviet Union. They should press that U2/. be cleared of reds now. DAYS Wednesday, April 23.--St. George, patron of England. He was a tri- bune under Diocletian and rebuked the Emperor for persecuting Chris- tmaas. For this he was tortured and put to death. Thursday, April 24.--St. Fidells of Slgnmxingen, a rich and noble law- 'er, entered the Capuchin Order. He preached against the Calvinists in Switzerland and after a sermon at Sevis was attacked and killed. Friday, April 25.---St. Mark, Evan- gelist, was converted by St. Peter, whom he afterward accompanied to Rome as secretary and inter- pr£ter. He founded the Church in Alexandria. After governing his See for years he was seized by en- emies of the Faith and martyred. l:'erfected In War Now Blocking Way to Peace By J. J. Gilbert HE leaders of peoples who are striving earnestly to effect a lasting peace, and soon, are fmding that one aspect of ! the war continues with real and almost diabolical vigor. The application * a technique which was brought to its greates refinement in +.he war is now contributing heavily to th* frustration of the press. The technique ispropaganda- Propaganda is not itself bad. In its first sense  means a sys- tematic spread of knowledge or information. If that which is dis- seminated is good and helpful, then of course propaganda is a laudable thing. But long since, now, the idea of the secret, the clandestine and even the false has come to be associated with pro- paganda. Where propaganda spreads errors, its evil is in di- rect proportion to its efficiency. Purpose Is To Obscure But an added lamentable aspect of bad propaganda is that many, many people are not able to detect the various techniques. Thus, while they are fully aware that they are liable to be propagand- ized, they do not realize that they are presently being subjected to it. During the war the purpose of camouflage was not to make something invisible, but to make it appear as something else. Thus a large war plant might have been made to appear as a pastoral hill. So, today, the purpose of propaganda is not to make an issue all black or white, but to make it obscure. The result is confusion as to both thinking and action, .and it is proving an enorm- ous hindrance to peace and order. This applies to matters in beth the international and domestic fields, with the result that there is either an inability or an un- willingness to take clear-cut stands on many important ques- tions. The only hope is firm ad- herence to right principles. But this, today, is not as easy as it sounds, for it is the very purpose of modern propaganda to make one uncertain about ,he principles, or uncertain about acting upon those principles once they are clearly seen. The Case of Greece and Turkey Attempts to weigh the proposal to extend aid to Greece and Tur- key on the basis of whether it is necessary and right, were imme- diately beset with argumentations that we ought to take into ques- tion not principles but only ex- pediency. One ws told not to look so much to whether Greece and Turkey should be aided but to whether Soviet Russia would resent our giving it. Before we should extend aid .to any country, we were told, we should consider whether Russia is really strong or really weak. If she is strong we ought to avoid everything that displeases her: if we can ascer- tain that, behind her iron cur- tain, she is really weak, perhaps we can" risk giving aid to a de- serving nation. It is difficult to get a lear-cut study of whether the Yaita and Potsdam agreements are really as bad as they seem. Someone al- ways pops up in a group to say they are "faits accomplis, over and done with, and that maybe Saturday, April 26. -- SS. Cletus and Marcelilmm, Popes, Martyrs. we can have "better luck next C}etus was the third Bishop ofl time. And if one protests: "But Rome, reigning from 76 to 89. Mar- I are they ? • I dont recall that they celllnus succeeded to the Papacy have been ratified by the Senate. in 296 in the time of Diocletian. There is soomeone else ready to begin right away to talk about "spilled milk," etc., etc. You can't quite get the main issue in focus, i Someone is always obscuring the picture for you. The War Threat Seek a closer look at some practices, Hitlean in appearance, which have their existence in a Europe controlled by the Western Democracies and their ally, and there is no lack of those who say: "Forget iL It's only happening to people who were our enemies. •hey had it coming to them." It i is never allowed to become a ques- tion of right or wrong, or whether it is degrading to ourselves, or even'if these things actually are happening. We are given a fuzzy picture. One of the most common ways of muddling things up is to say we mustn't do this or that, be- cause it will lead to war. That's very effective. Many people just back away from a course of action when this is brought up, not even inquiring as to who said it would lead to war. Nobody wants war, of course. Everybody is very sick and tired of it But it certinatly has been American to risk the threat of war in order to see that ustice is done. Question Box i Q. What prediction did our Laxly of Fatima make regarding the conversion of Russia? When, where and to whom did the Blessed Virgin appear? A The first appearance of our Blessed Lady at Fatima, a small city in Portugal, was made to three children on May 13, 1917. These three little ones were pas- turing their parents' sheep. They were humble folk of the moun- tains. As the children were cross- ing a field a sudden flash of light- ning startled them. They turned and a little to the right they saw, standing on a small evergreen oak tree, a Lady of incomparable beauty. The children were fright- ened until the Lady assured them in a gentle and sweet voice that they need not be afraid• She told the children that she came from Heaven and asked them to be at tlt same place on the thirteenth of each month until October, promising that then she would re- veal to them her identity. The children followed this injunction. The people of Fatima and the surrounding country had heard the story of the children and on the thirteenth of October a crowd that was estimated at seventy thousand gathered in the place of apparition. The Blessed Virgin ,appeared and that all might rec- ognize the authenticity of the ap- parition, events gave manifesta- tion. The sun began to revolve like some great wheel throwing shafts of colored light, which flashed and fell upon the earth and sky. It seemed that the sun was about to drop out of the firmament. All these facts have been attested by reliable author- JUST " BETWEEN US TheC-00urch Democratic (Written by the Rev. Rich- ard Ginder for the Narberth Movement, sponsored by the National Council of Catholic Men.) EVgRY baby is a question- mark. There's no telling what he might become. Per- haps he is a genius -- or, per- haps, a moron. He might be elected president or shoc as a gangster. Certainly the priest doesn't know, as he pours the water, whether he's making a Catholic genius, moron, president, or gangster. But he never refuses baptism on that account. The priest is an optimist, giving every infant the benefit of the doubt. It's a sort of universal suffrage• And so you find in the Catholic Church a motley variety repre- senting pactically every imagin- able sort of person. Jesus told St. Peter, the first Pope, that he would become a fisher of men, and He compared His Church to a net, sweeping wide and deep. There would be bad Catholics, and He made that quite clear in His parable about the wheat and the tares• The field was to be let go until the harvest time; when the tares would be sifted out of the wheat and thrown into the furnace. Elsewhere Jesus said that not until the last day would PeteWs net be dumped on the shore and the good fish sorted from the bad. And so we have a Church that at times reminds us of Grand Central Station, with all types of people jostling and elbowing one another on their trip to heaven. Some are near their destination and some are hopelessly far. But then who can judge? Even the infamous on their deathbed, like the thief on the cross, may still cry out: "Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy king- dom"--and never did Jesus refuse a plea for mercy. Catholic beliefs, too, are deter- mined by the very democratic pro- cess of taking a vote. If ever a be- lief is called into question, we sim- ply canvass the Church to examine the consensus of opinion. In that way we protect ourselves against dictatorship `by the self-styled ex- pert, the "specialist," the individ- ual who claims private wire-serv- ice between himself and God. But wait' In taking our vote, we don't stop merely with our own generation• That would be unfair to the dead. We consult them, too, through the records, writings, diaries, and other monuments left in Our archives. It's a count made as completely as our human re- sources will allow. If we can as- sure ourselves finally that a be- lief has been held semper, ubique, ab omnibus---always, everywhere, by all--then we accept it as re- vealed ,by the Lord who promised His perpetual assistance to His ;hurch in preaching all things whatsoever He commanded to all men. Quotations The mind of the bigot is like the pupil of the eye; the .more light you pour into it, the more it will contract.---O. W. Holmes. • Age in a virtuous person of eith- er sex carries in it an authority v,hich makes it preferable to all the pleasures of youth.--Sir Rich- ard Steele. From small profits and many expenses Comes a whole life of sad con- 'equenees. Chinese Proverb ity and by representatives of the Church. As the Bishop of the dio- cese said: "This phenomenon, which was not registered in any astronomical observatory--a fact which shows that it was not natural---was seen by persons of every class and grade of society, by believers and incredulous, by journalists representing the prin- cipal Portuguese papers, and even by persons miles away." When our Blessed Mother appeared at Fa- tima she spoke about World War One, which was then in its sec- ond year. In her words she pro- phesied the war fr6m which we :have so recently emerged. Her I prophecy of Russia is recorded in these words which she spoke: "The war is going to end but if people do not cease to offend God, not much time will elapse, and pre- cisely during the next pontificate another and more terrible war will commence. To avoid this, I ask for the consecration of the world to my Immaculate Heart and Communion in reparation on the first Saturday of each month• If my requests are heard, Russia will be converted and there will be peace. Otherwise great errors will be spread throughout the world, giving rise to wars and : persecutions against the Church. !The good will suffer martyrdom ,and the Holy'Father will have to suffer much. Different nations will be destroyed but in the end my Immaculate Heart will tri- umph. The Holy Father will con- secrate Russia to me and an era of..peace will be granted to hu- manity." & Friday, Aprii 18, 19q7 Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By ,ev. James M. Gillis, C.S.P. Not Sufficiently Radical WHEN Catholic writers and speakers insist that radicals are not radical enough, and that the only true radicals are Catholics, some people  perhaps even some of our own may imagine that such writers and speakers are straining after a paradox. But it is no paradox. It is the simple truth. "Radicar',comes from the Latin radix. Radix means root. A "radical" in the strict sense is one who goes to the root of things. Now God is the Root of all things. The only true radicals, therefore, are those who believe in God and who bring God into the solu- tion of every problem. Yes, every problem. Not theological problems alone, but philosophical and moral problems. Yes and political problems. I have not the time or the space here and now to go into that phase of the matter. Suffice it to say at the moment that no political problem can be solved -- radically solved -- with- out reference to God. That's the reason why so - little progress is being made at Moscow and at Lake Success (what a name!) The delegates to those Conferences have ]thrown away the key to the door of peace. They are fumbling away ]at the keyhole like a drunken man using a jackknife or corkscrew to unlock a door. Even Richard couldn't open a door that way. To shift back from the simile of the key and the door to the ety - mologT of radix. There is another radix besides God--man. Unless you have the right idea o£ man you will never solve any of the problems that are now baffling the world.Those problems are on the surface political. But a political problem if you follow it down ta the roots turns out to be a humanitarian or a philanthropic problem. Those are big words, pompons words, pedantic words. But don't reach for a dictionary. They mean •simply "having to do with man." Ca you not see the little word "man" imbedded in the big word "humanitarian ?" Also in the word "philantrophic" is the word "anthropos" which is Greek for "man." I recognize at this point that I am talking like a teacher in school. But don't get restive; there is just one more point to the lesson. If every political problem is at root a problem about man, it must be plain that no political problem can be solved by those who have a wrong idea about man. That's the end of the classroom lecture in logic and etymologT. Now let's see how it applies in current affairs. VChen the Pope and together with him our own Bishops here in America keep harping on "man," the "digmity of man," the "nobility: of man," the Incarnation of God in man; the Mystical Body, the doctrine of man in a wonderful way iden- tiffed with God, people who don't think very deeply may complain, "Why don't those church-men drop theology and come to close grips with what is actually going on in the world?" Such people don't see that the only way to come to close grips with actuality is to insist upon the truth in regard to man, and in regard to God. Walter Lippman--not one of us though I wish he were---said in a coltmm some time ago, "Unless you accept the revelation committed to the Mediterranean world nineteen hundred years ago, and unless you also accept philosophic perennis you have no ground upon which to base an argument for the rights of man." His phrase about revela- tion is a roundabout way of saying "the Gospel." Philosaphia perennis is the philosophy adopted, improved and authorized by the Catholic Church. So it amounts to this: without the Gospel and the teachinof0the Church it is foolishness to talk about the Rights of Man. So there we are back again to the key-word man, and the even more important key-word God. No one who rejects God can hope to solve the prob- lems now before us. Neither can anyone who has an ignoble or even an imperfect idea of the nature of man. Solutions which do not get down to man and God are not sufficiently radical. We who dig down deep are the true radicals. (Copyright, 1947, N.C.W.C. News Service) THE WEDDING RING ! Fundamental Similarities DIFFERENCES of various kinds between spouses readily lead to friction and tension in the home. Similarly, like- ness or sameness between life-partners in maa-riage tends to make for harmony and compatibility. One migbt safely add that usually the greater the similarity, particularly with re. gard to the more fundamental aims of life, the more can one expect agreement and harmon. ions family life. In the selection of  life-partner, therefore, care- ful attention should be given the matter of similarities. There should be every assurance that at least a fair proportion of theh exist between the two parties to the marriage contract. A large variety of similarities between individuals--some per- sonal, some cultural---can be dis- tinguished. In part, similarities among individuals are due to in- born traits. More so, in all proba- bility, are they due to cultural influences• It is culture that shapes a person's life pattern'. When cultures are similar, there- fore, life patterns will show con- siderable similarity• As a result, one can expect conduct among in- dividuals that is at least in fair accord, and by the same tokefl, one can expect harmonious rela- tions between husband and wife. A Community of Interest The term "culture" is very broad and not easily defined• However, it is commonly taken to include such items as the re- ligious, racial, educational, rec- reational, and still other customs of a people. In fact, the word "customs" is not extensive enough here. Culture embraces all such things as the folkways, the aims and tastes, the attitudes, the ideas and ideals of a people• In all these there can be sameness or similarity. To be sure, there can be differences too. Sameness of nationality or race implies a large amount of simi- larity of culture, and is a matter of importance. Sameness of re- ligion is fundamental. It goes very far towards guaranteeing sameness of aims regarding all life, and sameness of attitudes more •specifically with regard to the more fundamental concerns of home life. It makes for a com- munity of interest in a most im- portant field• In like manner smilar recrea- tional and social interests, simi- lar likes and dislikes, similar in- clinations a n d disinclinations, similar enthusiasms and aversions are of importance as binding or integrating factors• Normally, all such similarities tend to unite the couple by providing a com- munity of interests. An Essential Difference There is one matter, at least, in which emphasis should he on dissixnilarity and difference rath- er than on similarity and like- ness. That is, the matter of sex traits or qualifications. The reason for this is that the sexes are by nature different, not similar. I They are complementary, not identicaI. Together in family life, man and woman form one func- tioning unit. The two are mutual- ly dependent parts of one func- tioning whole. Hence basic in their lives must be mutuality and cooperation• Antagonism an d competition tend to failure ar/d tragedy. Assuredly, in permanent mar- ried life, the average man and woman rightly desire in a life partner no small share of these characteristics and normal at- tractions of the respective sexes. Without these, something essen- tial is lacking in the functions of their hame life. If there were no atmosphere the average temperature over the earth's surface would be about 18 degrees F. instead of the ob- served 60 degrees F. The first Atlantic cable was laid in 1858 by a company organ- ized by Cyrus W. Field. A more successful and efficient one was laid between the United States and Great Britain in 186. The first airmail service in the United States was begun, expert- mentally, between Washington and New York City on May 15, 1918. Page Four - -" (3ATHOEIC nORTHWEST PROGRESS $, " Telephone MAin 8880 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle (4) Entered as Second-Class Matter at the Postoffice at Seattle February 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 WILJ_ffAM P. O'0ONNELL REV. ANDREW PROUTY Managing Editor Editor Published by the Northwest Progress Co. President, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M., ST,DI Bishop of Seattle The Catholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function as the official newspaper of our diocese. It is a necessary channel of information and instruction and a bond of union- The Catholic newspaper supports and de- fends the honIe, the school and the Church. Our diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it should have, as indeed it has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every priest. x 00om00uo,,t, e i" Be U N THERE is no use denying that the American policy of anti _-communist intervention in Greece and Turkey had pro- found repercussion on the U.N. Contrary to prevalent opin- ion, however, the crisis at Lake Success is not so much caused by the alleged "by-passing" of U.N. by President Truman, as by the sudden reali- zation- that in its present setup tiIe U.N;" is fully incapable of resolving serious" international problems. :W h a t the - American action aclfieved, was merely to bare the basic weaknesses and evils in the foundations of : the organization. It showed that due to the privi- ged position held by Russia and her satellites in the organiza- tion, end U.N. action against the communist plot for world revolu- ti0n. can always be successfully blocked or nullified. Mr. Gromy- ko's and his friends' reaction to Prident Truman's step proved beyond doubt, that in fact only action outside of U.N. can at the present stage stop communist aggression. Thus tt seems, that the pologetic attitude assumed by 0ffleial circles in Washington in rcaetion to U.N. criticism of American decisions was not the answer; what is indicated is a determined demand for drastic reforms within U.N., so that its work could be trnsteL • This is in fact what many U.N. officials and members of delega- tions antieilted, especially those connected with the communist satellite regimes. A real panic krnong them was their reaction to the new line taken by the United States toward Commu- nism. Some of the satellite offi- cials openly confessed, that hard times are ahead of them now that "the United States has turned fascist" The Secretary General :Mr. Trygvie :Lie is quite embarrassed by the vulgar disregard for ob- ligations of impartiality shown by the Red packed Secretariat of .the U.N. Commission in Greece. What this writer reported three weeks ago about the work of the Commission was only too well confirmed by later press dis- patches. Now the scandal has be- tome' too great and too danger- ous for U.N. to conceal Mr. Lie decided to send his own representative to Europe to investigate the matter on the spot. He was-forced to do • so, since the scandal was en- courgging violent criticism that U.N. Is a red pernmM body, where the will of the non-com- munist majority is lmlyzed by the communist minority. In fact this is quite a legitimate assertion. As the situation stands today, the problem has evolved from American alleged 'q)y-passing , of the-issue itself with U.N. Mr. Gromyko and his faithful satel- IRes are trying to shift the dis- cussion from U.N. control over comml]tnist aggression in Greece toU.N, control over American help to that country. The Soviet delegate knQws of course that Is motion has no chance of win- e majority, but, while ac- cusing the United States for dis- regard for the U.N., he is doing his best to stymie all action and thus to prove that U.N. really cannot do much beyond mere debating. This is not surprising. As a matter of fact, journalists listen- lng to debates at Lake Success have become ather cynical. They have little illusions left concern- lng the prospects of changing viet role in the U.N. VVlmt was surprising indeed, l)wever, was the reaction with which certain segments of Ameri- can ,public opinion greeted Mr. Gromyko's speech d i r e e t e d agalrmt President Truman's pol- icy. Possibly encouraged by Washington's apologetic mood, they hailed Mr. Gromyko almost as a hero. While the Soviet dele- gate was launching on American soil an attache on United States foreign policy and used the U.N. as a rostrum to appeal in English to Anericans against their g0v- ernment, the New York Times published a picture of a beaming Mr. Gromyko shaking hands with West Point cadets who happened to be present at the meeting as spectators. And a poll was or- ganized by The Times among peo- ple in the gallery with the ef- fect that 20 out of 25 persons de- clared themselves for Mr. Gro- myko and against the United States policy. Was it not too much ? The possibility is, that what still is an opportunity to intro- duce essential reforms in the U.N. may turn into a face saving and a communist saving solution- What the Greek crisis has proved and will continue to prove is that as long as Russia controls within the U.N. nu- merous satellite and communist officials, no effectiv and re- liable work can be performed by the organization. The Soviet Union will use her network in the U.N. either to reach her own objectives, or if she fails, to make it useless and fluay wreck it. Courageous revision of some of the basic principles on which the organization is founded, now, can save U.N. The vote power should be abolished. Synthetic delegates of synthetic communist regimes, such as of Yugoslavia, Czecho- slovakia and Poland should be asked out. There should be no roam for faked representation at conference tables where legiti- mat e delegates of sovereign states are seated. And, following the example of recent decisions in Washington, a thorough house cleaning of communists should be instituted also at Lake Success. Mr. Lie candidly admitted in his press conference, that he makes no distinction between Communists and non-CMmmu- ulsts in his staff, as long as they are good workers. The American Delegation and Mr. Byron Price, the American As- sistant Secretary General of U.N. should perhaps educate Mr. Lie that Communists know only one loyalty, that for the FEAST Sunday, April 20.--St. Marcellinus, Bmhop, was bornin Africa of a noble family. Accompanied by Vin- cent and Dominus he went over into Gaul and preached the Gospel with great success. Many miracles are mentioned as having occurred at his tomb. He died at Embrun about 374. Monday, April 21. -- St. Anselm, _Axchbishop of Canterbury. His episcopate was a constant struggle with Kings William Rufus and Henry I, chiefly over the question of investitures. He introduced the Feast of the Imaculate Concep- tion ill the West. He died in 1109. Tuesday, .April 22.---St. Soterus Pope, Martyr, was raised to the Ci3air of Peter on the death of St. Anicetus in 175. He governed the Church until the year 182 and was distinguished for his alms-giving and for his opposltion to the her- esy of Montanus. From Page To Martyr ONE torrid morning in 1687 • a horse - drawn vehicle passed through a gate in the walls of Evora, a city in the heart of Alemtejo south of Lisbon. Its principal occupant was a traveler, dressed in black cas- sock and clerical hat, who had recently returned to Portugal after 13 years in the Orient. He was now on his way north to Portlegre to see his mother. He would also visit Lisbon to renew acquaintance with his boyhood companion, Prince Pedro, now  reigning as King Pedro II. Much had happened to John de Britto, the son of a former Vice- roy of Brazil, since he had served as page in the court of King John IV. He had left the court to enter the Jesuit novitiate and some years later, on March 15, 1673, had set out on his perilous journey to the famous Jesuit mission at Madura in the extreme south of India. The ship had safe- ly run the gantlet of Moorish pirates off the northwest coast of Africa, only to be becalmed in .the Gulf of Guinea and to en- counter a whirlpool off the Cape 'of Good Hope. Six months out of Lisbon, it reached Goa. With one companion, and traveling from Goa on foot, the young mission- cry had crossed the Gahts and finally reached his destination in July, 1674. King Pedro II did :not. wish his old friend to return to India. He tried to persuade him to remain at court as private tutor to the future John V. He also suggested that the Jesuit missionary serve as plomatic representative of :Portugal at the Papal Court in Rome. W?nen neither of these posts was accepted by Father de Britto,_ the King insisted that if he must return to India then he should go as Archbishop of Cranganore. But it was back to the Madura mission that John de Britto returned in 1690---re- turned to win a martyrs crown< Four years later the news of Father de Britto's death reached Lisbon. A year earlier--so slowly did news travel in those days-- the jeweled scimitar of the state executioner of a Marava prince had severed the missionary's bowed head from his kneeling body. A messenger from the royal palace in Lisbon carried the news to the martyr's mother in Porta legre and summoned her to court. Donna Beatrice did not put on mourning, but dressed as for a wedding feast. At court she was shown every honor as the mother of a martyr for the Faith the protomartyr of Madura. Two centuries later, John de Britto vas beatified by Pope Pins IX. Great Thoughts From the Psalms God Our Strength l love Thee, O Lord, Thou art my strength. Thou art, 0 Lord, my rock, my citadel, my Saviour. I shall invoke the Lord who is worthy, of all praise, And I shall be rescued from my enemies. To Thee, O Lord, do I hasten. Nev- er let me be brought to confu- sion. Whom shall I fear, for the Lord is my light and my salvation ? Before whom shall I tremble, for the Lord is my life's fortress ? f hostile camps rise up to attack me, My heart shall hold no fear. If war should break out against me, I shall be confident. Thou art my stronghold, a tower of strength against the enemy. Selections taken from Psalms 17, 30, 60 Soviet Union. They should press that U2/. be cleared of reds now. DAYS Wednesday, April 23.--St. George, patron of England. He was a tri- bune under Diocletian and rebuked the Emperor for persecuting Chris- tmaas. For this he was tortured and put to death. Thursday, April 24.--St. Fidells of Slgnmxingen, a rich and noble law- 'er, entered the Capuchin Order. He preached against the Calvinists in Switzerland and after a sermon at Sevis was attacked and killed. Friday, April 25.---St. Mark, Evan- gelist, was converted by St. Peter, whom he afterward accompanied to Rome as secretary and inter- pr£ter. He founded the Church in Alexandria. After governing his See for years he was seized by en- emies of the Faith and martyred. l:'erfected In War Now Blocking Way to Peace By J. J. Gilbert HE leaders of peoples who are striving earnestly to effect a lasting peace, and soon, are fmding that one aspect of ! the war continues with real and almost diabolical vigor. The application * a technique which was brought to its greates refinement in +.he war is now contributing heavily to th* frustration of the press. The technique ispropaganda- Propaganda is not itself bad. In its first sense  means a sys- tematic spread of knowledge or information. If that which is dis- seminated is good and helpful, then of course propaganda is a laudable thing. But long since, now, the idea of the secret, the clandestine and even the false has come to be associated with pro- paganda. Where propaganda spreads errors, its evil is in di- rect proportion to its efficiency. Purpose Is To Obscure But an added lamentable aspect of bad propaganda is that many, many people are not able to detect the various techniques. Thus, while they are fully aware that they are liable to be propagand- ized, they do not realize that they are presently being subjected to it. During the war the purpose of camouflage was not to make something invisible, but to make it appear as something else. Thus a large war plant might have been made to appear as a pastoral hill. So, today, the purpose of propaganda is not to make an issue all black or white, but to make it obscure. The result is confusion as to both thinking and action, .and it is proving an enorm- ous hindrance to peace and order. This applies to matters in beth the international and domestic fields, with the result that there is either an inability or an un- willingness to take clear-cut stands on many important ques- tions. The only hope is firm ad- herence to right principles. But this, today, is not as easy as it sounds, for it is the very purpose of modern propaganda to make one uncertain about ,he principles, or uncertain about acting upon those principles once they are clearly seen. The Case of Greece and Turkey Attempts to weigh the proposal to extend aid to Greece and Tur- key on the basis of whether it is necessary and right, were imme- diately beset with argumentations that we ought to take into ques- tion not principles but only ex- pediency. One ws told not to look so much to whether Greece and Turkey should be aided but to whether Soviet Russia would resent our giving it. Before we should extend aid .to any country, we were told, we should consider whether Russia is really strong or really weak. If she is strong we ought to avoid everything that displeases her: if we can ascer- tain that, behind her iron cur- tain, she is really weak, perhaps we can" risk giving aid to a de- serving nation. It is difficult to get a lear-cut study of whether the Yaita and Potsdam agreements are really as bad as they seem. Someone al- ways pops up in a group to say they are "faits accomplis, over and done with, and that maybe Saturday, April 26. -- SS. Cletus and Marcelilmm, Popes, Martyrs. we can have "better luck next C}etus was the third Bishop ofl time. And if one protests: "But Rome, reigning from 76 to 89. Mar- I are they ? • I dont recall that they celllnus succeeded to the Papacy have been ratified by the Senate. in 296 in the time of Diocletian. There is soomeone else ready to begin right away to talk about "spilled milk," etc., etc. You can't quite get the main issue in focus, i Someone is always obscuring the picture for you. The War Threat Seek a closer look at some practices, Hitlean in appearance, which have their existence in a Europe controlled by the Western Democracies and their ally, and there is no lack of those who say: "Forget iL It's only happening to people who were our enemies. •hey had it coming to them." It i is never allowed to become a ques- tion of right or wrong, or whether it is degrading to ourselves, or even'if these things actually are happening. We are given a fuzzy picture. One of the most common ways of muddling things up is to say we mustn't do this or that, be- cause it will lead to war. That's very effective. Many people just back away from a course of action when this is brought up, not even inquiring as to who said it would lead to war. Nobody wants war, of course. Everybody is very sick and tired of it But it certinatly has been American to risk the threat of war in order to see that ustice is done. Question Box i Q. What prediction did our Laxly of Fatima make regarding the conversion of Russia? When, where and to whom did the Blessed Virgin appear? A The first appearance of our Blessed Lady at Fatima, a small city in Portugal, was made to three children on May 13, 1917. These three little ones were pas- turing their parents' sheep. They were humble folk of the moun- tains. As the children were cross- ing a field a sudden flash of light- ning startled them. They turned and a little to the right they saw, standing on a small evergreen oak tree, a Lady of incomparable beauty. The children were fright- ened until the Lady assured them in a gentle and sweet voice that they need not be afraid• She told the children that she came from Heaven and asked them to be at tlt same place on the thirteenth of each month until October, promising that then she would re- veal to them her identity. The children followed this injunction. The people of Fatima and the surrounding country had heard the story of the children and on the thirteenth of October a crowd that was estimated at seventy thousand gathered in the place of apparition. The Blessed Virgin ,appeared and that all might rec- ognize the authenticity of the ap- parition, events gave manifesta- tion. The sun began to revolve like some great wheel throwing shafts of colored light, which flashed and fell upon the earth and sky. It seemed that the sun was about to drop out of the firmament. All these facts have been attested by reliable author- JUST " BETWEEN US TheC-00urch Democratic (Written by the Rev. Rich- ard Ginder for the Narberth Movement, sponsored by the National Council of Catholic Men.) EVgRY baby is a question- mark. There's no telling what he might become. Per- haps he is a genius -- or, per- haps, a moron. He might be elected president or shoc as a gangster. Certainly the priest doesn't know, as he pours the water, whether he's making a Catholic genius, moron, president, or gangster. But he never refuses baptism on that account. The priest is an optimist, giving every infant the benefit of the doubt. It's a sort of universal suffrage• And so you find in the Catholic Church a motley variety repre- senting pactically every imagin- able sort of person. Jesus told St. Peter, the first Pope, that he would become a fisher of men, and He compared His Church to a net, sweeping wide and deep. There would be bad Catholics, and He made that quite clear in His parable about the wheat and the tares• The field was to be let go until the harvest time; when the tares would be sifted out of the wheat and thrown into the furnace. Elsewhere Jesus said that not until the last day would PeteWs net be dumped on the shore and the good fish sorted from the bad. And so we have a Church that at times reminds us of Grand Central Station, with all types of people jostling and elbowing one another on their trip to heaven. Some are near their destination and some are hopelessly far. But then who can judge? Even the infamous on their deathbed, like the thief on the cross, may still cry out: "Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy king- dom"--and never did Jesus refuse a plea for mercy. Catholic beliefs, too, are deter- mined by the very democratic pro- cess of taking a vote. If ever a be- lief is called into question, we sim- ply canvass the Church to examine the consensus of opinion. In that way we protect ourselves against dictatorship `by the self-styled ex- pert, the "specialist," the individ- ual who claims private wire-serv- ice between himself and God. But wait' In taking our vote, we don't stop merely with our own generation• That would be unfair to the dead. We consult them, too, through the records, writings, diaries, and other monuments left in Our archives. It's a count made as completely as our human re- sources will allow. If we can as- sure ourselves finally that a be- lief has been held semper, ubique, ab omnibus---always, everywhere, by all--then we accept it as re- vealed ,by the Lord who promised His perpetual assistance to His ;hurch in preaching all things whatsoever He commanded to all men. Quotations The mind of the bigot is like the pupil of the eye; the .more light you pour into it, the more it will contract.---O. W. Holmes. • Age in a virtuous person of eith- er sex carries in it an authority v,hich makes it preferable to all the pleasures of youth.--Sir Rich- ard Steele. From small profits and many expenses Comes a whole life of sad con- 'equenees. Chinese Proverb ity and by representatives of the Church. As the Bishop of the dio- cese said: "This phenomenon, which was not registered in any astronomical observatory--a fact which shows that it was not natural---was seen by persons of every class and grade of society, by believers and incredulous, by journalists representing the prin- cipal Portuguese papers, and even by persons miles away." When our Blessed Mother appeared at Fa- tima she spoke about World War One, which was then in its sec- ond year. In her words she pro- phesied the war fr6m which we :have so recently emerged. Her I prophecy of Russia is recorded in these words which she spoke: "The war is going to end but if people do not cease to offend God, not much time will elapse, and pre- cisely during the next pontificate another and more terrible war will commence. To avoid this, I ask for the consecration of the world to my Immaculate Heart and Communion in reparation on the first Saturday of each month• If my requests are heard, Russia will be converted and there will be peace. Otherwise great errors will be spread throughout the world, giving rise to wars and : persecutions against the Church. !The good will suffer martyrdom ,and the Holy'Father will have to suffer much. Different nations will be destroyed but in the end my Immaculate Heart will tri- umph. The Holy Father will con- secrate Russia to me and an era of..peace will be granted to hu- manity." & Friday, Aprii 18, 19q7 Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By ,ev. James M. Gillis, C.S.P. Not Sufficiently Radical WHEN Catholic writers and speakers insist that radicals are not radical enough, and that the only true radicals are Catholics, some people  perhaps even some of our own may imagine that such writers and speakers are straining after a paradox. But it is no paradox. It is the simple truth. "Radicar',comes from the Latin radix. Radix means root. A "radical" in the strict sense is one who goes to the root of things. Now God is the Root of all things. The only true radicals, therefore, are those who believe in God and who bring God into the solu- tion of every problem. Yes, every problem. Not theological problems alone, but philosophical and moral problems. Yes and political problems. I have not the time or the space here and now to go into that phase of the matter. Suffice it to say at the moment that no political problem can be solved -- radically solved -- with- out reference to God. That's the reason why so - little progress is being made at Moscow and at Lake Success (what a name!) The delegates to those Conferences have ]thrown away the key to the door of peace. They are fumbling away ]at the keyhole like a drunken man using a jackknife or corkscrew to unlock a door. Even Richard couldn't open a door that way. To shift back from the simile of the key and the door to the ety - mologT of radix. There is another radix besides God--man. Unless you have the right idea o£ man you will never solve any of the problems that are now baffling the world.Those problems are on the surface political. But a political problem if you follow it down ta the roots turns out to be a humanitarian or a philanthropic problem. Those are big words, pompons words, pedantic words. But don't reach for a dictionary. They mean •simply "having to do with man." Ca you not see the little word "man" imbedded in the big word "humanitarian ?" Also in the word "philantrophic" is the word "anthropos" which is Greek for "man." I recognize at this point that I am talking like a teacher in school. But don't get restive; there is just one more point to the lesson. If every political problem is at root a problem about man, it must be plain that no political problem can be solved by those who have a wrong idea about man. That's the end of the classroom lecture in logic and etymologT. Now let's see how it applies in current affairs. VChen the Pope and together with him our own Bishops here in America keep harping on "man," the "digmity of man," the "nobility: of man," the Incarnation of God in man; the Mystical Body, the doctrine of man in a wonderful way iden- tiffed with God, people who don't think very deeply may complain, "Why don't those church-men drop theology and come to close grips with what is actually going on in the world?" Such people don't see that the only way to come to close grips with actuality is to insist upon the truth in regard to man, and in regard to God. Walter Lippman--not one of us though I wish he were---said in a coltmm some time ago, "Unless you accept the revelation committed to the Mediterranean world nineteen hundred years ago, and unless you also accept philosophic perennis you have no ground upon which to base an argument for the rights of man." His phrase about revela- tion is a roundabout way of saying "the Gospel." Philosaphia perennis is the philosophy adopted, improved and authorized by the Catholic Church. So it amounts to this: without the Gospel and the teachinof0the Church it is foolishness to talk about the Rights of Man. So there we are back again to the key-word man, and the even more important key-word God. No one who rejects God can hope to solve the prob- lems now before us. Neither can anyone who has an ignoble or even an imperfect idea of the nature of man. Solutions which do not get down to man and God are not sufficiently radical. We who dig down deep are the true radicals. (Copyright, 1947, N.C.W.C. News Service) THE WEDDING RING ! Fundamental Similarities DIFFERENCES of various kinds between spouses readily lead to friction and tension in the home. Similarly, like- ness or sameness between life-partners in maa-riage tends to make for harmony and compatibility. One migbt safely add that usually the greater the similarity, particularly with re. gard to the more fundamental aims of life, the more can one expect agreement and harmon. ions family life. In the selection of  life-partner, therefore, care- ful attention should be given the matter of similarities. There should be every assurance that at least a fair proportion of theh exist between the two parties to the marriage contract. A large variety of similarities between individuals--some per- sonal, some cultural---can be dis- tinguished. In part, similarities among individuals are due to in- born traits. More so, in all proba- bility, are they due to cultural influences• It is culture that shapes a person's life pattern'. When cultures are similar, there- fore, life patterns will show con- siderable similarity• As a result, one can expect conduct among in- dividuals that is at least in fair accord, and by the same tokefl, one can expect harmonious rela- tions between husband and wife. A Community of Interest The term "culture" is very broad and not easily defined• However, it is commonly taken to include such items as the re- ligious, racial, educational, rec- reational, and still other customs of a people. In fact, the word "customs" is not extensive enough here. Culture embraces all such things as the folkways, the aims and tastes, the attitudes, the ideas and ideals of a people• In all these there can be sameness or similarity. To be sure, there can be differences too. Sameness of nationality or race implies a large amount of simi- larity of culture, and is a matter of importance. Sameness of re- ligion is fundamental. It goes very far towards guaranteeing sameness of aims regarding all life, and sameness of attitudes more •specifically with regard to the more fundamental concerns of home life. It makes for a com- munity of interest in a most im- portant field• In like manner smilar recrea- tional and social interests, simi- lar likes and dislikes, similar in- clinations a n d disinclinations, similar enthusiasms and aversions are of importance as binding or integrating factors• Normally, all such similarities tend to unite the couple by providing a com- munity of interests. An Essential Difference There is one matter, at least, in which emphasis should he on dissixnilarity and difference rath- er than on similarity and like- ness. That is, the matter of sex traits or qualifications. The reason for this is that the sexes are by nature different, not similar. I They are complementary, not identicaI. Together in family life, man and woman form one func- tioning unit. The two are mutual- ly dependent parts of one func- tioning whole. Hence basic in their lives must be mutuality and cooperation• Antagonism an d competition tend to failure ar/d tragedy. Assuredly, in permanent mar- ried life, the average man and woman rightly desire in a life partner no small share of these characteristics and normal at- tractions of the respective sexes. Without these, something essen- tial is lacking in the functions of their hame life. If there were no atmosphere the average temperature over the earth's surface would be about 18 degrees F. instead of the ob- served 60 degrees F. The first Atlantic cable was laid in 1858 by a company organ- ized by Cyrus W. Field. A more successful and efficient one was laid between the United States and Great Britain in 186. The first airmail service in the United States was begun, expert- mentally, between Washington and New York City on May 15, 1918.