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April 17, 1964     Catholic Northwest Progress
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# #  hahn E.khart The(,logy of Aesthetics "SACRED A N D PROFANE BEAUTY: the HOLY IN ART," by Gerardus van der Leeuw, preface by Mircea Eliade; Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc., 357 pp., $6.50. HE contemplation of aes' thetics and the contempla- tion of theology are each an exhaustive, if honest, and com- prehensive area of study in it- self. The combination of these areas of the intellect in one book is an almost overwhelm- ing wealth of thought, a task seemingly too wondrous, too wide to attempt anything more than a superficial generaliza- tion, perhaps a "history of art" section of an anthropology text book. Van der Leeuw does not dis- appoint those readers who look for a profound, meaningful in- vestigation of the exact posi- tion of art in relation to theol- guy. He does this in a method reminiscent of St. John of the Cross, in that he explores high- ly transcendental abstractions with n scientific phenomenolog- ical method. While it does not seem pos- aihie to maintain an absolute purity in objectivity in such a work,: the author approaches the optimum. Art, according to the author, has had varying degrees of as- sociation w i t h theology. At times man sees and appreciates the real connection between his aesthetic creations and his spiritual aspirations. H e is aware of the common notes, the unity that makes beauty a manifestation of the Divine. Certain basic notions have . been well known and well ex- postulated from Plato, through St. Thomas Aquinas and Dos- By JOHN J. ECKHART toevski. It is'the search for this unity that preoccupies this Dutch scholar and philosopher. He readily admits the basic simplicity of the terms, words such as "art," "beauty," "uni- ty," and "theology." He does not envision his work as adding to the vocab- ulary of artistic esoterica, but rather to work with these terms as they are commonly and generally understood. However in admitting the es- sential simplicity of the terms and their application, he indi- cates how arrival at a true (in the philosophical sense) re- lationship, must entail some d e t a i I e d investigation. This should amaze no one when we think of the tremendous mathe- matical prelude to E--MC z. Each of the major art forms is considered at length, both as an entity in itself, and as an ex- pression of those longings, dreams, goals, passions, and primal stirrings in man, the child of God. It is the author's opinion that the first art form, the contin- uingly most meaningful art form, is the dance. It is this ex- pression, which can be ex- pressed as the image in action, that best reflects the deepest theological relationship of man playing before the throne of God. Music, the plastic arts, the word, are all concerned with theology. The degrees of im- portance each holds is the subject of much of this book. The author must define his words, his track of travel, and those shadowy, but non-objec- tive boundaries that delineate and identify what he would propose as the theology of art. It is in his theology that we might find some minor cause of disagreement, but no cause for concern. His aesthetics seem impeccable. His know- ledge of the arts is encyclo- pedic at the minimum. It is to his further credit that be used his exhaustive accum- ulation of facts and impressions as a tool, and not as an obvious banner of erudition to. flap in the sterile wind of public imag- ery. Whether he uses a Mozart opera or a Javanese dance as an example, there can be no mistaking his love for the beau- tiful, and his complete accept- ance of beauty as a part of the Divine unity of redemption. It would serve no further purpose to trot out an exam- ple or two to prove the point. There are too many exam- ples, too profuse a garden to pick any one flower. Professor van de r Leeuw died in 1950. It should be a long day's march ere next we meet again such a combination of in- tellect, love, and talent. Feature Films On Television Bellingham KING-TV (NBC) Channel $ KVOS-TV Channel 12 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma Seattle KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel 11 KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 K'rvw-'I'x r Channel 13 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A.I--Morally Unobjectionable for General Patronage; A.II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-III--Morally Unobjectionab;e for Adults: l-Morally Objectionnble in Part for All; C-Condemned; SC--Separate Classification; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films before being shown on tele- vision are edited to conform to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, ob]ectionable parts contained in the original plot may be #eteted in the television version and thus tke original Legion rating may not be entirely correct.) SATURDAY, APRIL 18 4:00 p.m.KInO-TV--The Daughter ot Dr. Jekyll .................... A-|I 5:30 p.m.KTVW-TV--Jalna .......................................... NR 9:00 p.m.mKVOS.TV--Men In War ................................... A-H 9:00 p.m.KINO.TV--The GIH In the Red Velvet Swing .............. A-II I0:00 p.m.--KTNT.TV--The Mummy's Curse ........................... A-II 11:00 p.m.KVOS.TV--Where Danger Lives ............................ A-If 11:00p.m.KIRO-TVThe Desert Song ................................ B I1:1S p.m.--KING-'I'V--The End of the Affair .......................... A-II 11:15 p.m.KOMO.TV--Ambush ........................................ ,A-I lZ:30 a.m.KVOS.TV--Crlmlno1 Lawyer ............................... A-It SUNDAY, APRIL 19 9.00 ).m.--KING-TV--Thlet at Damascus ................................ e 2:30 ).m.--KVOS.TV--TarzOn and the Mermaids ...................... A-I 2:30 ).m.KOMO-TVHer TweJve Men ...................  ............ A.I Z:20 ,.m.--KIRO-TV--Where There's Llte ............................. A-tl 4:30 ).m.KTVW-TV--To eeat the Sand ............................. NR 5:00 ,.m.--KVOS-TVrrlnce of Foxes ................................ A-II 7:00 ).m.--KTVW-TV--The Big Sky .................................... A-II 11:00 ,.m.KIRO-TVWhlle the City Sleeps .............................. B 11:10 l.m.KOMO-TV--Intent to KIll ................................ B 12:00 a.m.--KVOS.TV Flame of New Orleans .............. : .......... A-II MONDAY, APRIL 20 $:00 o.m,--KOMO-TV--The Ship That Died of Shame ................. A-I 3:30 p.m.--KING-TVOeath of a Salesman (Part I) ................. A-H S:30 p.m.--KVOS-TVaov from Oklahoma ............................. A-I 7:30 p.m.--KING-TV$even Cities of Gold ............................ A-I 11:00 p.m.--KVO$.TV--Nobody Lives Forever .......................... A-II 11:3g p,m.KOMO-TVTho Magnetic Monster ......................... A-I I:00 a.m.--KTVW-TVThere Goes My Girl ............................ A-t TUESDAY, APRIL 21 9:00 p.m.--KOMO-TV--The Jackpot ............................... A-II 3:30 p.m,--KING.TV--Oeath at a Salesman (Part Jl) ................ A-II S:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--The Fearmokers ................................ A.II 11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Face to Face .................................... a 11:30 p.m.--KOMO-TV--The Golden Mask .............................. A-II 1:00 a,m.--KTVW-TV--They Made Her a Spy ......................... A-II WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 9:00 a.m.KOMO-TVAIr Strike .................................. NR 3:30 p.m.--KING.TVThe Last Outpost ................................ A-I S:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Underground .................................... e 7:00 p.m.KIRO-TVAppolntment In Honduras ......................... B 10:00 p.m.--KTVW-TVHltler's Chlfdron ............................... A-II 11:00 p.m..:.-KVOS-TV--Eddle Cantor Story ............................. A-I 11:30 p,m,--KOMO-TV--Romeo and Juliet ............................... A-I 11:55 p.m.--KTVW.TV--BulIet Code ....................... , .......... A-I 1:00 a.m.KTVW-TV--Pettlcoat Larceny .............................. A-II THURSDAY, APRIL 2,1 9:00 a.m.--KOMO.TV--Klng's Rhapsody ................................ NR 3:30 p.m.--KINO-TV--The Rage of Parls ................................ 8 5:30 p.m.--KVOS-TV--The Gamma People ............................ A-II 10:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--PIoy Girl .................................... B 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TVFor the Love of Mary .......................... A-i 11:30 p.m.KOMO-TV--East Side, West Side ............................. B 1: a.m.--KTVW-TV--The Soldier and the Lady ...................... A-II FRIDAY, APRIL 21 9:00 a.m.--KOMO-TVPlunder Road ................................... A-I $:30 p.m.KINO-TV--Law vs. Bill the Kid .......................... A-II S:$0 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Bad0e of Marshall Brenaan .................... A-I 7:00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Watusl ............................................ A-I 8:00 o.m.--KTVW-TVStaIIon West ..................................... A-I 11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Shadow at a Doubt ............................ A-II 11:00 p.m.--KTVW.TV--Powder Smoke Range .......................... NR 11:30 p.ns.--KOMO-TV--No Trees in the Street ......................... NR 1:00 a.m.--KTVW.TV--The Whip Hand ................................ A-I 1:00 a.m.--KVOS-TV--A Question of Loyalty ........................... NR This Review I| Spoo$ored by Catho]ic Gifts & Church Goods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasant shopping atmosphere with a select variety of religious gifts. i607 Union SL, Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 i i THE SIGN OF GOOD FOOD . . YOUR ASSURANCE OF SAVINGS 70 Stores In Eastern & Western Washington To Sarve You I I ) Frldey, April 17, 1%4 THE PROGRESSES This Blown Up Nothingness " Wife Feels Like By MOST REVEREND FULTON J. SHEEN LELMUD THIELICHE asks: 'Is not the lar a month to the Vicar of Christ to feed the | JChristian Western worldonthesameroad poor intheshmsofLatinAmerica? Prisoner in Home of separation from its origin and the source of its blessings as was the prodigal son when he We have too much; they have too little! The left the father s house? Are we not in danger Lord does not want us to give up split-level of being struck with our freezers and television homes, but He does ask that our hearts be less By John J. Kane, Ph.D. sets--not that they are bad in themselves but hard than Calvary s rocks, which were split at I ted like a prisoner in my home. My husband has recently because we have made them into a delusive kind His Love for us. The next time you are asked taken over all shopping, handling el money, and ! get out only of stuffing to fill up our emptied and peaceless lives? And meanwhile we are still impressed by all this blown up nothingness and many even indulge in the illusion that when 'X Day' comes we shall be able to impress the invading Com- munists with all these gadgets. I am afraid the Communists will hold their noses at the vile smelling wealth of the man who squandered the father's capital and goes babbling around a battlefield with a few decayed Christion ideas. The Christian West becomes something impos- sible to believe." The Christian who has suffered from Nazis, Communists and war has gained an insight into world affairs that is far deeper than that of us who "must stay up to listen to the 11 o'clock news." The burden of the world is not on govern- ment, nor on foreign aid, nor on education. The burden of saving a world in rebellion be- cause it is hungry falls primarily on us Cath- olics. Scripture tells us that God's judgment begins with the Church. May we go on build- ing million dollar chanceries, dormitories, high schools and religious houses-all of which are necessary--without giving one to I0 per cent of the east to the Good Lord Who does not have walls for His Eucharistic Presence in Africa, Asia and elsewhere? May we Catholics con- tinue to enjoy our ears, our gadgets, our com- forts, our snacks between meals--all of which are good--without ever giving at least a dol- to make a contribution of $1,000 for a $2 million high school with gymnasium, send $900 for the school and make the pastor happy that he as well as you will share in bearing Christ's Cross in other parts of the world by giving the other $100 to the Holy Father and his Society for the Propagation of the Faith. GOD LOVE YOU to M.L. for $5 "I promised tbe Sacred Heart o[ Jesus and also my Patron Saint that I would make my grad. rude public i[ my prayers were answered." . . to S.C. /or ,$150 "'This is for Pope Paul and his missions." . 1., I., and R. [or $I "Please use our allowance to save a soul /or Christ." . . . to J.P.C. [or $500 "'This is a Lenten oHering /or the missions to be used wherewer deemed best." Mission combines the best features of all other magazines: stories, pictures, statistics and details, human interest. Take an interest in the suffering humanity of the mission world and send your sacrifice along with a request to be put on the mailing list of this bi-monthly maga- zine. Cut out this column, pin your sacrifices to It and mail it to Most Rev. Fulton J. Sheen, National Director of the Society for the Propa- gation of the Faith, 366 - 5th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001, or your Archdiocesan Director, Rev. Stephen Szeman, 907 Terry Ave., Seattle 98104. Khrushchev Relishes 'Death Tale' (Continued from Page 1) be catastrophic for the U.S., the Free World and the cause of peace. This line of indoctrination is still being carried along in the U.S. press and so Khrushchev is rejoicing. Now the theme runs some. thing like this: There is a widening, unbridgeable r i f t between Red China and the Soviet Union; Khrushchev is a man of peace and he is definitely mellowing in his dealing with the West; inter- nally, the Soviet Union is be- coming more liberal, is pay- ing less attention to war strength and more to consum- er goods; tensions have been relaxed and now coexistence with Soviet Communism is possible. More than that, since Khrush- chev has done more than any- one in bringing about peace, not only is his survival of prime importance, but the Free World should come to his defense against the Red Chinese. The entire thesis is based on the assumption that Khrushchev is expounding a new interpre- tation of Marx as opposed to Red China's "Stalinist" view of war and violence. What new interpretation is there, we wonder, since Soviet theoreticians are still holding fast to Marxist-Leninist doc- trine? The distinction between Chinese and Soviet differences lies merely in methods to be used in achieving the same goal--the destruction of capital- ism and the Free World. In his remarks Tuesday night, Khrushchev said: "Imperialists are beginning to hope the Communist inter- national will weaken due to Hurry, Fellows! "MomS' just bought some SUNNY JIM PRESERVES BUY THE FAMILY PACK! . . . and remembo SUNNY |IM TABLE SYRUP Be Up-To.Date Keep your Progress sub- scription current. This is the month to bill our subscr/b- ers. Please pay promptly . . and special thanks to the many who do so . i the action of China. The hope is premature because in the past there were always oc- casions when Communists had to fight against bourge- oisism and for the purity of Marxlsm-Leninlsm. "We have come out of each battle stronger than before, and we will come from this disput stronger and more united than ever." Furthermore, in Hungary last week, Khrushchev repeated a prediction he has made many times before, that Communism will be victorious throughout the world. and that there is a real "split" in the Communist camp, adhering to one or the other side is all to the good of Communism. In a word, supporting either side would in effect be support- ing Communism as such. It would not tend to defeat Com- munism. That is precisely what Khrush- Misconceptions chev wants, and so he develops Other fallacies in the thesis this new gimmick of a "split" being so widely promulgated to with Red China. the American people are that Brazil Ac's Khrushchev is vastly different from' Stalin and that we should Now in Brazil, well-informed support him in his fight against Map. Those who are old "enough will remember when Stalin was known as "good old Uncle Joe" and even some of our high pub- lic officials contended that they liked the dictator and could trust him and do business with him. A new set of public officials seems to be making the same mistake. Only I a s t week, Khrushehev had many nice things to say about them, and they in turn said a great many nice things about Khrushchev. Essentially, the "Butcher of Budapest" is not one whit less ruthless and cruel than Stalin was. He's only a better actor. The handwriting is on the wall for all to see, but few,people look at the wall. Last week, Khrushchev also made a point in calling the Red Chinese "splitters" of Commu- nism and called on other coun- tries of the world to rally around Moscow, even though admitting that Peking also had its adherents. Now even conceding, for the sake of argument, that all the above assumptions be true opportunity Discover a child's love for you. people who know that their country has escaped a Com- munist takeover, by only a slen- der margin, take a quite dif- ferent view of the situation. As expected, Gen. Humber- to Castelo Branco was elected interim president by the Bra- zilian Congress Saturday. Ex- president G o u I a r t ' s Labor P a r t y members abstained from voting. Before this happened, the military junta proclaimed some "institutional" decrees to put an end to Communist influence in government, extending even to the ousting of known Com- munist members of Congress. However, any officials removed from office on this charge would be granted a judicial appeal. Otherwise, t h e democratic constitution of 1946 remains in force, and the new decrees will be valid only until Jan. 31, 1966, following a general elec- tion in October, next year. Almost immediately an exo- Calendar SUNDAY, APRIL 19, THIRD SUNDAY A F T E R EASTER, MASS: Jubilate--Shout with joy (White). GI., Cr., PreC. of East- er. Mass for Parish. MONDAY, APRIL 20, FER- IAL MONDAY, MASS as on Sun. TUESDAY, APRIL 21, ST. ANSELM, BISHOP, CONFES- SOR, DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH, MASS: In media-- In the midst (White). GI., PreC. of Easter. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, SS. SOTER AND CAIUS, POPES AND MARTYRS, MASS: Si diligis me--If thou lovest Me (Red). GI., PreC. of Easter. THURSDAY, APRIL 23, COM- MEMORATION OF ST. GEORGE, MASS as on Sun. (White). GI., 2nd Pr. of St. George, Pref. of Easter. Or MASS of St. George: Protex- isti--Thou hast protected (Red). GI., Pref. of Easter. FRIDAY, APRIL 24, ST. FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, MARTYR, MASS: Protexisti- Thou hast protected (Red). GI., PreC. of Easter. Abstinence. SATURDAY, APRIL 25, ST. MARK, EVANGELIST, MASS: Protexisti--Thou hast proteCted (Red). GI., 2nd Pr. of Major Litanites, Cr., PreC. of Apostles. Mass for Parish. RED ERIC Looks Like Champagne dus of Congressmen and other public officials began, some going into hiding, others flee- ing the country. In Rio de Janeiro alone, some 3,000 ar- rests of Communists were made and 15 tons of Commu- nist literature confiscated. Among public officials denied the right to hold political office because of pro-Communist lean- ings were 40 Deputies and Sena- tors and two former presidents. The ban will last for 10 years. 'Fanny Hill' Held Obscene In New York NEW YORK (NC) -- The publisher of the 18th c e n t u r y novel "Fanny Hill" has announced plans to appeal from a court ruling which held t h e book obscene and barred its publication and distribution in New York state. The novel, written in the mid-18th century by John Cle. land concerns an English country girl's life as a pros- titute in London. Walter J. Minton, president of G. P. Putnam's Sons, said he would ask the state court (,f Appeals to review a ruling against the book by the Ap- pellate Division of the State Supreme Court. He said he would carry the case to the U. S. Supreme Court if neces- sary. The Appellate Division held recently by a 3-2 margin that "Fanny Hill" is "essenti- ally an uninterrupted series of minutely detailed descriptions of sexual adventures . . . with nothing more." The two dissenting judges held that the book has "re- deeming social value." Seeking an injunction against Putnam's were New York City Corporation Counsel Leo Larkin and the city s five dis- trict attorneys. The court's ruling was not expected to affect sale of the book by Put- nam outside the state. In ad- dition, several other publishers have also issued editions of the book. Legion Condenms 'Of Wayward Love' NEW YORK (NC)--The Na- tional Legion of Decency eval- uated "Of Wayward Love," an Italian movie distributed by Pathe. in its condemned (Class C) category on the ground it is "grossly suggestive and porno- graphic." "This film, an amoral trilogy whose subject matter includes marital infidelity, seduction and illicit sex, in its treatment is grossly suggestive and por- nographic," the legion objec- tion stated. Legion Of Decency First-Run Movies Showing In Seattle A-l--Incredible Mr. Limpet. Other Movies Currently Showing A-l--Wonderful World of tha Brothers Grimm, The Promoter, Brlgacloon, Stu- dent Prince, Lilies of the Field, Rock- A-Sye Baby. A-2---To Kill A Mocklnoblrd, 40 Lbs. of Trouble, Lavender Hill Mob, Soven Days In May, Flower Drum ,Song, Four- D Man, Man. A-3--Hud, The Cardinal, Love With The Proper Stronger, The V|ctors, G$O- hal Affair, Man's Favorlte Sport. A.4--L-Shaped Room, Tom Jones, Dr. Strongelove. B--Irma LaDouce, Cleopatra, Soldler In the Raln, Who's Been $1eeplng In My Bed? [or church and the doctor. We have eight children. My husband says the place is filthy and 1 a,n a poor housekeeper. He doesn't understand the difference between filth and clutter. Recently I have been ill and the doctor says it is my nerves. My huband [ears he'll be considered henpecked i[ he lets me handle n, oney and do things. LL husbancls and wives must eventually come to terms with management of the home, of money, rearing of children and recreation. There cannot be any hard and fast rule about who does what, at least not in modern society. Your husband seems to be living in the last century and not to have heard of the "emancipation" of women. Even then most women got out of the home to shop, and enjoyed some recrea- tion if only by visiting with neighbors who were also shopping. Years ago husbands and wives could pretty well define their roles in family life because they were established by custom. The husband earned the income, the wife reared the children and kept house. The "good provider" was sort of the ideal hus- band, and sometimes about the only thing he did provide was money. So far as companionship was concerned, he was apt to find a great deal of it through fraternal organizations. But there was recreation within the family, particularly in the more rural areas. It took an active form, singing around the piano, cards for some, various games and the like. There was little commercial recreation outside of large cities and the family more or less had to find its own. When social activities took place outside the home, even dances, they were family affairs attended by three generations. The contrast with the past is self-evident. Today, a wife may not only work outside the home, she may even earn more than her husband, although this is the exception, not the rule. Child rearing tends more and more frequently, as it should, to be a joint enterprise of husband, and wife. While women are usually the shoppers, men seem to go with them or sometimes to take this over. But all of these changes, good or bad, pose problems. HEY mean that the individual family must define the roles of husband, wife and children. At times circumstances alone will do this for them. If a wife works in the evening, a husband will have to baby sit and thus play a more important part in child rearing than usual. If a husband or wife proves incompe- tent to handle money, the other spouse out of pure necessity should take over. But for the most part it is not so simple as this. Social changes has made the position of the father somewhat weaker than in the past. The American family is more democratic and today not only wives but even older children seek a voice in the management of family affairs. Just how a husband or wife views this will depend in no small measure on their individual personalities and on the kind of family from which each came. We all learn to become husbands and fathers, wives and mothers, partly as a result of our own rearing. We have ob- served our own mothers and fathers in action. In fact, for most of us, the only famly we ever knew well was the one in which we were reared. The older a person is, the more likely he was to have had a family in which the father approximated a patti. arch. This tradition was particularly strong among some immi. grant families. But few modern fathers' can act like the stem patriarch ol the past. Even if his wife would tolerate it, highly unlikely, his older children will not. So father must come to terms with the facts of contemporary society. Here is where personality factors enter the situation. Within each person there is a desire to feel important in some area o[ life. Some individuals, udmittedly, must feel important, even superior to others, in all areas of life. Many men are able to achieve this feeling of importance through their jobs or pro- fessions. Women can generally do it within the home, pride in hous keeping, in child rearing and the like. Stii| others may find thit kind of satisfaction in hobbies or sports. But the finding of il somewhere and somehow is quite necessary. HERE are men who for various reasons cannot obtain thi: feeling of importance on the job or through hobbies ol sports. So one of the most obvious places where they can at tempt to take over, to be the boss, is within the family. Sucl a man can become a veritable tyrant, especially if this tmsatis fled personality need is acute. It may assume various aspects. One way to feel important, parttcnlarly if yen actually are a bit inferior, is to be deroga- tory of others. If you cannot equal or surpass them, then you can pretend and claim that they are inferior to you. It doesn't really matter whether this is true or not, the person can per- suade himself it is true and thus salve his ego. When a husband suddenly takes over complete managemen of the family, unless his wife has actually showed herself in capable of managing her part, one suspects that somehow h, has lost his feeling of self esteem. A direct confrontation with his on this matter is futile. Ii fact, it will push him harder toward dictatorship. An indirect approach is indicated. Try to bolster his ego, help him to feel wanted, to experience a sense of satisfaction in his own worth. Occasional compliments about him and no complaints ma,. be enough. Once he feels that his ego is no longer threatened he can relax, and relax the purse strings as well F the house is cluttered, and with eight children it would b amazing if it were not on occasion, seek his help. Not i] cleaning in the house but in dividing up some of the househol, chores among the older children. Suggest you go out togethe with at least an intimation of how proud you are to be soo with him. Eventually such husbands can be persuaded that any mother of a large family does need to get out alone or with her husband occasionally. Every wife needs a vacation from routine care of a home and children, even if the vacation is only a few hours. Of course, in these circumstances it is possible to have direct showdown, to enlist the help of others. But unless the basi cause of it all is removed, it is tilting at windmills. The change if it occurs at all, will be brief. A great deal of your husband' attitude is probably unconscious, and you will only get at it b I an indirect approach to romove the cause. Ask for it at your favorite food stere WHY PAY MORE? t,,,e e, t00oum} ctiveness |1 II as the over-priced brand FULL PINT ONLY AMBER, REd or BLUE Burke Sals Co., heattl-,