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March 28, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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Page Four ---" ,- - C ; T H O C I C F,I O R T H W E S T P R O G R E S $ -- Fray, March 28, 1947 "-"" - • " f*TRANOE BUTTRI00 i JUST Clttl,-K,ew,. [,eM' 1,, Cet00,li,l Ueep.Kooted Lhrlstlan: 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle (4), Telephone ssso II 11 r" "./ ;.. f tit • - , Ak -/ Entered as Second- .Class Matter at the Postofflee at Seattle February . ,, T---. , II II r':::llllrrl ";/'11- KI ICCl::l nc IVl::ll/ 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 A Umnue Ilaml  /1JILl ! -Vl • .jjlll ij i • tgV ,- " - "it v il0ROUb 5T01l 5 0F CATH01J Gll / P. O'CONNELJ REV. A_NDR]W' PROUTY (Written by the Rev. Richard 0Jl , Managing Editor Editor; Ginder for the Narberth Iove- Published by the Northwest Progress Co. ment, sponsored by the National President, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M., S.TDq Council of Catholic Mien.) • Bishop of Seattle The (atholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function T HERE is, in this wide world, a man who claims to be as the official newspaper of our diocese. It is a channel of information and instruction and a bond of uniom The Catholic newspaper suports and de- fends the home, the school and the Church. Our diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it should have, as indeed it has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every priest. Bishop of Seattla The United Nations St• Peter was head of the Apost- les. His name occurs in the Gos- !pels and the /tots oi the Apostles 190 times. The closest runner-up Cannot Extinguish is St. John, the Beloved Disciple. : .... His name is mentioned 29 times. St. Peter's name stands at the of every list of the Apostles Soviet Fire "in Greece to befofindintheScriptures. In fact, of all the Apostles, he was the first to be called by Jesus (Matthew 4, 18; Mark 1, 16; Luke 5, 1). By The Observer ............ . . Our Lord changed this Apostle's AMCIG critical opnnons voiced m connecuon vntn rres,- name from Simon to Cephas, "" ident Trnman's decision to extend American help .to '-hich ts interpreted Peter" (Pe-  ..... n '"  ..... r  xr-sd that  +od of Iter being Greek for rock). The L €, , ".=--'= --   F ' ' ,....,,,...o, i full significance of the change direct United States intervention the United Nations sh0uld]didn't come out until, one day, .... . * . . . Jesus smd to him Thou art Pe have been used to restore peace and order. Although assmt-] • - ance to Greece by no means ter; and upon this rock I will • -- "" ms and is lunteers for action in Greece are k-uild my Church, and the gates of stoves ,:uropean prome ...... ---, ..... *** * "to- the I sougnr Dy me l%v un-ough loc- bell shall not prevail against it. cL,j  l- .... v  m "s  arti s in Poland And I will give thee the keys of Russians at the peripheries of the I_ m_ co mums p a e •. , .... hungary ana omer countries tin- continent, the mtuatmn is so ser-I ..... ious that U. N. intervention at [ uer omec rme. "" - ta e would be cam-II This is me situation the U. N. the presen s g Commission [Enquiry faced. Coin- pletely inadequate. i A U. N. Enquiry Commission[ p°sed of members chosen in already has been sent to the Bal- agreement with the U. 1. routine kans and for almost two months of treating Soviet agents on the the successornot of Jesus Christ, or of St. Paul, or St. Francis; this man claims to I be te successor of St. Peter the Apostle. His claim is honored by 60,000,000 people and -- oddly ehough -- his claim is nowhere contested, as far as we know. There is no one saying a.ywhere, "Not he but I am the successor of St. Peter. He is an impostor. I am the rightful holder of the title." And yet it is an important title. YL must be, to hold the unswerving allegiance of so many millions -- not jusi ignorant people, mind you, but smart people, as welh writers of books, school teachers, invent- ers, composers, sen:tOrs, and the has studied the Greek border con- flict. This writer recently had the opportunity to receive some first hand information on the work of the Commission as well as on the whole aspect of *.he Greek situation with which the Commission is etrusted. These facts bring a picture of Greece as a Soviet tinder box set to blow up in the faces of America and England, along the familiar pattern applied already by Rus- sia in countries of her zone in Europe. Miniature Soviet Rclmblic The communist Earn affd its methods are compared, by observ- ers in Greece, to the Nazis in Germany during their rutlflss campaign prior to Hitler's :tri- umph in 1933. It conducts a con- nt barrage of propaganda and pressure on the population. Eam's action is on a national and inter- national scale, with many agencies in London, Paris and lew York and with the implied assurance that Earn is Greece herself and soon will be in control of the Country. The military arm of the Greek Communists is the so called "De- mocratic Army" otherwise knowr as "bandits." Itis well disciplined, 'e'I-armed and well trained. It acts with great energy and has cceeded in seizing full control of considerable areas of the coun- try, as example Thessaly, where the Greek authorities no longer lave access. Here miniature Sov- t republics have been set up. :" Demoralizing Tactics : The atrocities now heing pei'pe- ti'ated by the "bandits" in North- ern Greece are used by the Com- munists to intimidate the popula- "flora The threat is directed espec- ially against all who helped to save the lives of British soldiers, dlors and airmen during the war. he Greek people, having recent- iy witnessed the slaughter of 65,- 000 of their fellow citizens live lnder constant fear of what is to come. : The legitimate Greek army is "lso a target of communist pene- tration. A conscript army, it ecessarily includes all citizens and the communist element am- ong the soldiers is used by Earn ,O spread treason and defections. here 2s a special communist or- ganization with cells in the army called Kossor, which promotes de- • .eatism and disruption. Now the army has been re-or- ganized and equipped with modern weapons by the British. The new Greek commandos are reported to be picked men with excellent mo- rale and armed with light weap- ons suitable for mountain war- fare. Russh Moves By 300,000 . Parachute Trcops * There is clear evidence of AI-i banian, Yugoslav and Bulgar in- tervention in the Greek civil war• e satellites' pressure on the northern Greek border is strongly upported by a steadily increas- Ing contingent of the Red Army in Bulgaria. Including two recent- y arrived parachute divisiop, it is dd to total 300,000 men. Vol- same basis a,b delegates of inde- pendent nations, this Commission is weak internally. Communits on her staff recognize of course the Soviet member as their only chieT. Seerelriat Sympathetic Towards Conmmnlsm Especially the Secretariat of the Commission was so biased in its pro-Soviet and anti-Greek at- titude, that it has discredited it- self completely. The Secretary is Roescher Lund, a man with notor- ious communist sympathies. The deputy SeCretary is a representa- tive of the Polish puppet regime, "Gottesman. The press officer, Mr. Ryan is a Russian who has ac- the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 16, 18-19). In other words, "Thou art the Rock, and upon this Rock I will build my Church." Later, Jesus told him "I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not; and do thou, when once thou hast turned again, strengthen thy brethren" (Luke 22, 32). And then, after the Resurrec- tion, in a very dramatic way, St.' Peter is told to feed not only the lambs but the sheep of God's flock (John 21, 16-17). So St. Peter was established as -tead of Christ's Church in lan- guage as clear as one could use. ln'd since the Church was to live forever, it would forever be need- ing a visible Head and representa- tive of Christ Jesus, its invisible Head. That Head would be the successor, not of St. John or St. AAdrew, but of St. Peter. That is why we Catholics re- vere and honor our Holy Father-- quired Canaan citizenship. The|because we see in him the succes- remaining assisting secretaries [sor of St. Peter and the Visible are: a Ukrainian Volokhov, Paul- lain a Frenchman and Shearer al-: legedly an Anglo-Saxon. All favor the communist side. • The majority of the Commis- sion, however, is considered to be taking its work seri6usly and im- partially. It is tired of and some* constant propaganda and pressure of the Earn,, which acts as though it were the legitimate Greek state. When the Soviet delegate, to- gether with the Albanian, Yugo- slav and Bulgarian liaison offi- cers, was trying to concentrate the Commission's work only on Greek domestic affairs, this ef- fort failed. Another trick of the Soviet delegate was, when he tried to have the CommiSsion hear the commander of the "Democratic Army", "general" Marko in his capacity as commander, hoping in this way to obts for him inter- national recognition. The commis- sion again refused. Marko was finally invited under his original name Valadis to meet i with a special team of the Cam- !mission, but he failed to appear. This prompted the Russian and "Polish" members to desert the team and proceed for a secret consultation with the "general." With such Trojan Horses in its midst, the Commission, in spite of the hardest efforts of its majority, cannot possibly perform a unmai- mous and constructive, work. If exclusively the U. N. were charged with solving the Greek problem, it would be Russia's vie- tory. Great Thoughts F]gOM I'E  Tiead of Christ's Church. I Question Box Q. Is the Last Gospel really a part of the Mass ? A. The Gospel which is read at the end of the Mas is a devel- opment in the iturgy. Originally the service ended at the "Ite Mis- sa est." The. prayer before the blessing and the blessing by the priest "are private devotions that gradually became a part of the Li- turgical service. The beginning of the Gospel of St. John was much used as a private devotion during the !Tid- die Ages. Sometimes-it was read at Baptism and Extreme Unction. Priests recited it as a prayer of thanksgiving after Mass, a trace of this still being found in the ceremonial for bishops which di- rects that the Bishop was to .be- gin the ast Gospel of the altar and recite while retiring to the throne. At the beginning of the thir- teenth century this Gospel of St. John was said at the altar hy many priests. In 1570 Pope Pins V. made it of universal observa- tion. Q. What genuine relics of our Divine Lord are there in ex- istence? Does the robe which He wore still exist? A. The only relics identified directly with our Divine Lord are the winding robe which He wore in the tomb, the Cross on which He hung, the nails which fatened Him. to the Cross, and a portion of the Crown of Thorns. The robe which He habitually wore has not been preserved. Thanks Be To God We, Thy people and the sheep of Thy flock, will celebrate Thy glory for- ever; From generation to generation we shall sing Thy praises! I shall give thanks in a great as- sembly; in a vast throng I shall praise Thee. He has not done in like manner to every nation. What shall I give to the Lord for all that He gives to me? Excerpts tken from Pmlms 78, , 47, lz. "Quotations Worth 00uoting" Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By Rev. Jomes M. Gillis, C.S.P. Momentous Decision IT should not be necessary to explain again and again that this column does not concern itself with politics. But there are high politics and low politics; politics as an art and science and politics as an ignoble trade. Unfortunately when people in general use the word politics, they don't mean what Aristotle meant, or St. Thomas, or St. Rob- to interfere in'America. He said: ert Bellarmine or Grotius. They ] "By the. policy to which we have don't mean the kind of politics  cohered since the days of Wash- which you "find ling ton, we have done more for in "The Feder- [ the cause "of liberty in the world alist" written I than we could effect by resort to by the men I arms. We have shown to other ha- who selected a., tions the way to greatness and ]happiness. We should adhere to form of gov- ernment for the  our system of peace and avoid the [ Jnited States I distant wars of Europe. We should But when thekeep our lamp burning brightly word-- or the [ on this western shore as a light to subject matter [ all nations, ather than to hazard without t h e I its utter extinction amid the ruins w o r d -- ap- of fallen and 'falling republics in pears in this Europe." column it is Such is the policy which we the nobler, not the baser thing are now asked to abandon. With- that I have in mind. out arguing either for or against the suggestion. I am content to Now comes the necessity of remark that the Amerioan people speaking about what may well be will do well to decide this momen- the most important political ques- tous matter with the utmost care lion that has confronted the peo- :ple since the founding of the Re- and only after mature deliberation., public. The .suggestion has been We shall come back to the ques- i made by no less a person than tion again, and consider the more the President of the United States recent reasons for the contem- that we break a tradition to which plated cbange. we haw adhered since 1783. We are asked to step in and take a If you want to get results, ex- hand in the conflict between po- periment and nature will talk to litical systems in Europe. Hither- ,cu; don't experiment with lead to we have declined to do so. When eenciis. --Thomas A. Edison. the French people dethroned and decapitated their King 'to set up what they called a Republic, but which had little if any resemblance to our Repuhlie, we didn't say nay to them, even though "we had been so greatly indebted to the King that we might never have got started without him. We didn't even say to the regicides, "What you call a Republic is a svage dictatorship, and we don't like it." We minded our own .business. When the so-called Republic was' taken over by Napoleon Bona- parte, and even when he made it an Empire, we kept our mouth shut We did business with him as we had done business with King Louis ,and with the members of the Directory, though these latter were as savage as Hitler or Stalin. It was our prfnciple not to" tell the French.people, or any other people what form of government they should have. We adhered to that .principle with relative if not absolute fi- delity for a hundred years omd more. When we interfered "be- tween Spain and Cuba; afifl Spain and the Philippines, we took pains to explain that we were acting for the sake of philanthropy, not politics. Even so, we did make something of a break With our tradition. In strict accordance with that tradi- tion we would not have interfered even to prevent inhumanity. When the Hungarian patriot Louis t:cssuth came to our shores in 1850 to enlist the sympathy of the American people in his struggle against Austria, he was received with great enthusiasm. He en- listed the support of Daniel Web- .Southern Accent IT'S u long, long way.from Atlanta t9 Shanghai, parti- cularly when there are many fletours en route. How Wil- noth Farmer, graduate of a Methodist college in Georgia's Capital, made the trip has been told so well in The Emory Alum- nus, that it bears repetition: "The 'boys' of '98 should be in- terested to learn that Father Francis Xavier is still sufficiently interested in them to have re- quested recently a list of the names and addresses of the living members of the aid Oxford "class. "The trouble is, most of the old boys will have no idea who Father Francis Xavier is. The name wi!l bring back no memories• While the 'Father' might cuse out-right wonderment among the alumni of Yet II!bmine the World • h i;: (Continhed f.r0m Page 1) shackled by stafidKrdized conven- tions, they saw m ore deeply the mystery of life and ceath. !'::t'% Russian Writers Foretold Struggle ..-,% . Leontiev believeffhe mission of the Russian people ws to beget the hnti-Christ. He foresaw the revolution as a tyrannical and bloody • one, attracting the peoples of the' East and ten going on to annihilate the bourgeois world of the Wet, bringing not the end of the world but the end of the epoch of materialism, natioralism, liber- alism. Pecherin believed that Russi would bring "its om annihilation" for which one would hate his own country for a time, but in the end. it would inaug-drate a new cycle of world history. a small Methodist college.  Pushkin foresaw the possibility "Francis Xavier' is the relig ,, ' " [ of a Russian revblt senseless ,and mus name of the young fellow " ' I merciless" but i the end freedom from Conyers whom they knew I zising on her light-shedding as Wilmth A Farmer He is an l . ,, - ' • • • .  wings. . especmlly " noteworthy person. I Lerm0ntov in his poem Predic- After some 16 years as a Prates [ -lion written in 1830 foretold the taut missionary in Cbiry, he was revolution "The day ll come, for Rus- sia, that drR day $qmn the Tsarsydiadem will fall, and the)', Rabble who loved him once, xli love no more, - And many will ubsist on death and gore, , , Downtrodden law no shelter will provide ':: For child or guiltless woman. Plague will ride From stinking corpses through the grief-strtek land charge of all Jesuit work in I Where fluttering')ra, from cot-" Shanghai, where tages demadd • " his address is 260 Nanzing :Road, c/o the Sacred Help none can g;e!;A famine's Heart Church. gnaing pangs Vill grip the countryside th converted to Catholicism a,nd now serves as a Jesuit priest in that country. "Fri6nds and relatives of Father Farmer lost track of him for many a year, for from the time of Pearl Harbor Iy until last Aug- ust no word was received from him by letter or otherwise. "He had been under Japanese rule since the fall of Shanghai, and from December 1941, to Aug- ust 1945, was interned. At liberty for more than a year now, he is in "The Japanese held the priest 1 in especially close custody because [ he would have been too valuable a I man to their enemies, what with[ his thorough speaking knowledge[ of both Chinese and Japanese. I "lather Farmer has been in' China for 45 years in both Protestant and Catholic work, and lms served in all sections of the vast country. After he had been graduated from Emory and haken ministerial training at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., he became a missionary in 1901 and served the Protestant Church un- til 1917. "Then came his conversion and he left China to study for the priesthood--for seven years in Fnance and England, one at St. Andrew's:on-the- H u d s o n, New York. That was the only occasion on which he was returned to the States since going to the Orient. "Going back to Shanghai in 1925, he has •been based there ever since. But for all his experiences the like of which no other Emory man has undergone, he's un- changed in at least two respects. First he wants to know where his cassmates are and what they're doing. Secondly, to quote a re- turned veteran who recently saw t,'m in Shanghai: "He hasfi't lost his Southern accent one bit'." God. and Your Child By Marie Cecilia McGrath, Ph. D. Devotion As A Habit- HAW you ever thought that it would require almost a miracle for a person whose interests have "been absorbed all week by everything except religious thoughts, to go into Church for a half hour on Sunday and then be able so to control his mind or that he assistg at Mass with devotion and realization ? Our minds do not work that way. We oannot draw out of nothingness, suddenly and th no particular stimulus, a high, degree of interest. There must be prep- aration through what psycholo- gists call association. Spiritual writers speak of this association as. the remote preparation for a particular form of prayer, wheth- er it is hearing Mass, or medita- tion, or any ther type of spiri- tual devotion• We are ahvays slrange and at a loss when on unfamiliar ground. This holds true for interest in God and the ability to converse with Him, as well as for anyone else• Vv'hat can we do about the 'situation practically, you and I and the friends whom we might influence? We know the value of the Mass. We want to hear Sunday Mass worthily and profff- ably. How can we do it? Let us begin with this matter of remote preparation. Are we faithful to morning and night prayers? How do we say them? If we say them inattentively, Joseph, help me! .... O Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in Thee!" Or, you may make up an ejaculation on the spur of the mdment: "My God, I do love you! .... Holy Spirit, this -needs light, so please !" Such aspirations can become a habit and as such, they serve to keep the heart and will close to Our Lrd. CNG THE GLOBE Another big help, especially for insuring that we hear Sunday Mass properly, is to make a little intention in our prayers of unit- ing with all the Masses to be said that day or night• Some simple statement such as, "Sweet Sacred Heart,  unite myself to Thy Sacrifice in all the Masses of today," or "of tonight" would serve this purpose. There are actually, on an average, four ruthless fangs Dawn on the siTdams will shed• a crimson light = And then will be-,re, yealed the Ln of migh t . Whom thott wilt know; and thou wilt underst4ti Wherefore a shying blade is in his hand ..... Sorrow will be the: lot, grief melt thine eyes :' And he will la4gt all thy tears and sighs." Tyrutchev feared the dark ir- rational elements' in Russia would bring a catastrophe and foresaw Christianity as its saving power: "A homeless orphan, man, be- reft of power And naked, stands before the dread abyss, Stands face to face in this his direful hour With its dark emptiness: and all that quickens , Glad things and:light seem now a dream long past; 'Tis unfamiliar tli'gs, unsolved, as darkness fllickens Reveal his fated- heritage at last." . Cheadaev foresaw the triumph of barbarism in' Russia, saying: "It will triumph "not because it is right but because we are wrong." Dostoievsky predicted in his work The Possessed that Russia would undergo the :!'temptation of bread and power" of a godless social teaching/:wierein "Every member of society spies on the others, and it is his. duty to in- form against th ' . . all are slaves, and equal in their slavery. Cicero will have-his: tongue cut ! out, Copernicus Will have his eyes put out, ShakesIeare will be stoned . . . slaves are bound to be equal . . . A teaal, r who laughs with children at t/ir God, and at their cadle is on our side; the lawyer who defends an educated murderer because, he is more cultured than his. victims and could not help murdering them to get money is one Of us; the school boys who murder a peasant for the sake of sensation :are ours; the juries who acqult evel-y criminal are ours; the prosecutor who FEAST Sunday, Marqli : .--St. John Ciimacus, while yery young, made such progress in:qeriing that he Was called the scholastic. :His most noted boolv is: called the "Climax, or Ladder of Perfec- tion.' ..... Monday, March 31.St. Benja- min, deacon and"martyr, su£fered chalices raised each second of the I in Persia during-the persecution day and night. To unite with' under Varanes, grandson of Sa- these elevations of the Sacred [ par III. He w a tortured and Host and Chalice which encircle [ executed in 424. the globe, is to center our mind[ Tuesday, April l.St, ltugn, on Holy Mass as well as to bring [ Bishop of Grenoble, from the cra- us much grace. Idle appeared to,:be:a child at It is possible, too, with a little tbenediction" He/:rigned his Bi- effort,.to recMl.this offering sev- ] shopric and end:red an austere eral times during the day to ; [Abbey but was nyer able to oh- make it as it were, a salute to ] tain -ermission from the HoP Our Lord fronn wherever we may a i " i in litu y ...... : ..... I See th t he mg t de so de. De ]n the mlusI: OI ne worK-a-uayi, .... -;" ' -1-2 world Thi ...... ne oeo on Apr.¢ ±  . • s Is no rouen, nu I[ will make all the difference be-I Wednesday, April 2.---ML Frsn- tween attention and inattention, ] cls of Paula left.hLs home in Cala- devotion and weariness, at Sun- I bria to live as a nit. St. Fran- day Mass. Try it and see. cis workedm miracles and ;rter. But when the question came .Good books like good friends are ! up as to whether we should in-'then our habit will be just the few and chosen, the more select] terfere between Hungary and same inattention at ,Mass on Sun- the more en3oyable Alcott • -- • Austria, Henry Clay, then Secre-. day morning. Our morning and • * * tary of State rejected the sug- night prayers could be fervent Let us be steadfast for Amer- gestion, ones. This is the place to start. ica, work and live for America, His statement is so significant They may not be long prayers, and eternally be on guard to de-ltha t I quote it, in substance. He lbut they must be said with at- e " " fend the Constitution and our ref fred to our ancient policy of tention and devotion. way of living against the virulent [ non-intervention" and mde the Another help is a fervent pray- poison of Communistic ideologT, i point that if we interfere in EU- er now and then during the day: J. clgar Hoover. rope, Europe would have a right "My Jesus, mercy! .... Jesus, Mary, trembles at a trR1 who fears he shall not be advanced enough is ours; among officials and literary men we have lots, and they don't know it themselves . . . We will' "•proclaim destruction, we will set fires going, we will set legends ' going, every scurvy oToup wiH he of use. Well there ql! be an up- heaval; there's going to be such an upset as the world has nev;r seen before Russia will be over- whelmed with darkness, and the earth will weep for its gods." Of The Daa But though he ana others, such as Khomyakov, saw a godless fa- naticism possessing Russia. they nevertheless saw that after pass- ing through this night of dark- ness there would come the dawn when Russia would give the Faith to Europe ,and be the medium of unting Europe and Asia. They did not expect to see that day, but they believed it would come, as Khomyakov said: "We must remember that not -one of us will survive until the time of the harvest, but that our spiritual and ascetic labors .of plowing, sowing and weeding are not for Russia's sake alone, but for the sake of the whole world. This thought alone can give perma- nence to our efforts . . . Russian life holds many treasures, not for "her own people, but for many others, if not for all nations." Soloviev, who died at the close of the last century, declared in the face of Russia's imminent dark- 'hess that "Russia has a religious calling of world wide significance. .In the poverty and humiliation of her people, are the signs of her special vocation. Dostoievsky Pictured a Land Freed From Devils Dostoievsky himself believed that Russia like the young man in the land of the Genasenes- would become filled with devils in the beginning of the twentieth century. "All the sores, all the foul caR-. raglans, all the impurities, all the devils great and small, have mul- fiplied in that great invalid our beloved Russia." But then he believed that a the devil was cast out of the gaunt rnn into the swine, and plunged themselves into the sea/ that the devils of Russia "Will cast themselves down, possessed and raving, from the rocks into the sea, and we shall all be drowned--and a good thing too, for that is all we are fit for, but Russia will be healed ,and will sil: at the feet o? Jesus, and will look upon Him with astonishment." . .. "Sin is a stench, but stench will pass when the sun rises. Sin is transient, Christ is eternal; ou" people are subject to many sins, but they have only one idea, only one true love, and that is Christ."• There are three great qualities " of the Russian soul which war- rant these optimistic forecasts as to the future brilliance of Russia; deep religious feeling, capacity for pain and suffer- ing, and feIlowship. First, deep religious feeling. Atheism is not natural to the Russian. people, it has been art importation from the Western World. The Russian people have never been concerned with the problem of atheism, but only the problem of God's dealing with men in a sinful world. Russian writers and philosophers have seen in their country's persecution of religion, only their vain hope to despise. What is it that gives substance to the violence of their atheism if it be not the reality of the ob- ject which is attacked? Could men espouse prohibition unless there was something to prohibit; could there be anti-Christians un- less there were Christians ? How could there be atheists unless there were something to atheate? I AII atheists would be fools fight- 1 (Continu n  DAYS died at the age of 91 on Good Friday in 1507. : Thnrsday, April 3.--St. Richara, Bishop of Chichester, died in 1253 while preaching against the Sara- cens. Friday, April 4.Isidore, Arch- bishop, was born of a ducal fam- ily at Carthagena in Spain. He succeeded his brother Leander as Archbishop of Seville and success- fully foug]t against the Arian heresy. He died at Seville on April 4, 636, and was declared a Doctor of the Church within 16 years of his death. Saturday, April 5,V i n e en Fetter was called the 'Angel of Judgment.' At the point of death, because of grie over the schs=m afflicting the Church, he was mi- raculously recalled and told to go forth and convert sinners. For 21 years he preached throughout KMrope and converted thousands. He died at Vannes in Brittany in 1.419, Page Four ---" ,- - C ; T H O C I C F,I O R T H W E S T P R O G R E S $ -- Fray, March 28, 1947 "-"" - • " f*TRANOE BUTTRI00 i JUST Clttl,-K,ew,. [,eM' 1,, Cet00,li,l Ueep.Kooted Lhrlstlan: 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle (4), Telephone ssso II 11 r" "./ ;.. f tit • - , Ak -/ Entered as Second- .Class Matter at the Postofflee at Seattle February . ,, T---. , II II r':::llllrrl ";/'11- KI ICCl::l nc IVl::ll/ 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 A Umnue Ilaml  /1JILl ! -Vl • .jjlll ij i • tgV ,- " - "it v il0ROUb 5T01l 5 0F CATH01J Gll / P. O'CONNELJ REV. A_NDR]W' PROUTY (Written by the Rev. Richard 0Jl , Managing Editor Editor; Ginder for the Narberth Iove- Published by the Northwest Progress Co. ment, sponsored by the National President, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M., S.TDq Council of Catholic Mien.) • Bishop of Seattle The (atholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function T HERE is, in this wide world, a man who claims to be as the official newspaper of our diocese. It is a channel of information and instruction and a bond of uniom The Catholic newspaper suports and de- fends the home, the school and the Church. Our diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it should have, as indeed it has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every priest. Bishop of Seattla The United Nations St• Peter was head of the Apost- les. His name occurs in the Gos- !pels and the /tots oi the Apostles 190 times. The closest runner-up Cannot Extinguish is St. John, the Beloved Disciple. : .... His name is mentioned 29 times. St. Peter's name stands at the of every list of the Apostles Soviet Fire "in Greece to befofindintheScriptures. In fact, of all the Apostles, he was the first to be called by Jesus (Matthew 4, 18; Mark 1, 16; Luke 5, 1). By The Observer ............ . . Our Lord changed this Apostle's AMCIG critical opnnons voiced m connecuon vntn rres,- name from Simon to Cephas, "" ident Trnman's decision to extend American help .to '-hich ts interpreted Peter" (Pe-  ..... n '"  ..... r  xr-sd that  +od of Iter being Greek for rock). The L €, , ".=--'= --   F ' ' ,....,,,...o, i full significance of the change direct United States intervention the United Nations sh0uld]didn't come out until, one day, .... . * . . . Jesus smd to him Thou art Pe have been used to restore peace and order. Although assmt-] • - ance to Greece by no means ter; and upon this rock I will • -- "" ms and is lunteers for action in Greece are k-uild my Church, and the gates of stoves ,:uropean prome ...... ---, ..... *** * "to- the I sougnr Dy me l%v un-ough loc- bell shall not prevail against it. cL,j  l- .... v  m "s  arti s in Poland And I will give thee the keys of Russians at the peripheries of the I_ m_ co mums p a e •. , .... hungary ana omer countries tin- continent, the mtuatmn is so ser-I ..... ious that U. N. intervention at [ uer omec rme. "" - ta e would be cam-II This is me situation the U. N. the presen s g Commission [Enquiry faced. Coin- pletely inadequate. i A U. N. Enquiry Commission[ p°sed of members chosen in already has been sent to the Bal- agreement with the U. 1. routine kans and for almost two months of treating Soviet agents on the the successornot of Jesus Christ, or of St. Paul, or St. Francis; this man claims to I be te successor of St. Peter the Apostle. His claim is honored by 60,000,000 people and -- oddly ehough -- his claim is nowhere contested, as far as we know. There is no one saying a.ywhere, "Not he but I am the successor of St. Peter. He is an impostor. I am the rightful holder of the title." And yet it is an important title. YL must be, to hold the unswerving allegiance of so many millions -- not jusi ignorant people, mind you, but smart people, as welh writers of books, school teachers, invent- ers, composers, sen:tOrs, and the has studied the Greek border con- flict. This writer recently had the opportunity to receive some first hand information on the work of the Commission as well as on the whole aspect of *.he Greek situation with which the Commission is etrusted. These facts bring a picture of Greece as a Soviet tinder box set to blow up in the faces of America and England, along the familiar pattern applied already by Rus- sia in countries of her zone in Europe. Miniature Soviet Rclmblic The communist Earn affd its methods are compared, by observ- ers in Greece, to the Nazis in Germany during their rutlflss campaign prior to Hitler's :tri- umph in 1933. It conducts a con- nt barrage of propaganda and pressure on the population. Eam's action is on a national and inter- national scale, with many agencies in London, Paris and lew York and with the implied assurance that Earn is Greece herself and soon will be in control of the Country. The military arm of the Greek Communists is the so called "De- mocratic Army" otherwise knowr as "bandits." Itis well disciplined, 'e'I-armed and well trained. It acts with great energy and has cceeded in seizing full control of considerable areas of the coun- try, as example Thessaly, where the Greek authorities no longer lave access. Here miniature Sov- t republics have been set up. :" Demoralizing Tactics : The atrocities now heing pei'pe- ti'ated by the "bandits" in North- ern Greece are used by the Com- munists to intimidate the popula- "flora The threat is directed espec- ially against all who helped to save the lives of British soldiers, dlors and airmen during the war. he Greek people, having recent- iy witnessed the slaughter of 65,- 000 of their fellow citizens live lnder constant fear of what is to come. : The legitimate Greek army is "lso a target of communist pene- tration. A conscript army, it ecessarily includes all citizens and the communist element am- ong the soldiers is used by Earn ,O spread treason and defections. here 2s a special communist or- ganization with cells in the army called Kossor, which promotes de- • .eatism and disruption. Now the army has been re-or- ganized and equipped with modern weapons by the British. The new Greek commandos are reported to be picked men with excellent mo- rale and armed with light weap- ons suitable for mountain war- fare. Russh Moves By 300,000 . Parachute Trcops * There is clear evidence of AI-i banian, Yugoslav and Bulgar in- tervention in the Greek civil war• e satellites' pressure on the northern Greek border is strongly upported by a steadily increas- Ing contingent of the Red Army in Bulgaria. Including two recent- y arrived parachute divisiop, it is dd to total 300,000 men. Vol- same basis a,b delegates of inde- pendent nations, this Commission is weak internally. Communits on her staff recognize of course the Soviet member as their only chieT. Seerelriat Sympathetic Towards Conmmnlsm Especially the Secretariat of the Commission was so biased in its pro-Soviet and anti-Greek at- titude, that it has discredited it- self completely. The Secretary is Roescher Lund, a man with notor- ious communist sympathies. The deputy SeCretary is a representa- tive of the Polish puppet regime, "Gottesman. The press officer, Mr. Ryan is a Russian who has ac- the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 16, 18-19). In other words, "Thou art the Rock, and upon this Rock I will build my Church." Later, Jesus told him "I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not; and do thou, when once thou hast turned again, strengthen thy brethren" (Luke 22, 32). And then, after the Resurrec- tion, in a very dramatic way, St.' Peter is told to feed not only the lambs but the sheep of God's flock (John 21, 16-17). So St. Peter was established as -tead of Christ's Church in lan- guage as clear as one could use. ln'd since the Church was to live forever, it would forever be need- ing a visible Head and representa- tive of Christ Jesus, its invisible Head. That Head would be the successor, not of St. John or St. AAdrew, but of St. Peter. That is why we Catholics re- vere and honor our Holy Father-- quired Canaan citizenship. The|because we see in him the succes- remaining assisting secretaries [sor of St. Peter and the Visible are: a Ukrainian Volokhov, Paul- lain a Frenchman and Shearer al-: legedly an Anglo-Saxon. All favor the communist side. • The majority of the Commis- sion, however, is considered to be taking its work seri6usly and im- partially. It is tired of and some* constant propaganda and pressure of the Earn,, which acts as though it were the legitimate Greek state. When the Soviet delegate, to- gether with the Albanian, Yugo- slav and Bulgarian liaison offi- cers, was trying to concentrate the Commission's work only on Greek domestic affairs, this ef- fort failed. Another trick of the Soviet delegate was, when he tried to have the CommiSsion hear the commander of the "Democratic Army", "general" Marko in his capacity as commander, hoping in this way to obts for him inter- national recognition. The commis- sion again refused. Marko was finally invited under his original name Valadis to meet i with a special team of the Cam- !mission, but he failed to appear. This prompted the Russian and "Polish" members to desert the team and proceed for a secret consultation with the "general." With such Trojan Horses in its midst, the Commission, in spite of the hardest efforts of its majority, cannot possibly perform a unmai- mous and constructive, work. If exclusively the U. N. were charged with solving the Greek problem, it would be Russia's vie- tory. Great Thoughts F]gOM I'E  Tiead of Christ's Church. I Question Box Q. Is the Last Gospel really a part of the Mass ? A. The Gospel which is read at the end of the Mas is a devel- opment in the iturgy. Originally the service ended at the "Ite Mis- sa est." The. prayer before the blessing and the blessing by the priest "are private devotions that gradually became a part of the Li- turgical service. The beginning of the Gospel of St. John was much used as a private devotion during the !Tid- die Ages. Sometimes-it was read at Baptism and Extreme Unction. Priests recited it as a prayer of thanksgiving after Mass, a trace of this still being found in the ceremonial for bishops which di- rects that the Bishop was to .be- gin the ast Gospel of the altar and recite while retiring to the throne. At the beginning of the thir- teenth century this Gospel of St. John was said at the altar hy many priests. In 1570 Pope Pins V. made it of universal observa- tion. Q. What genuine relics of our Divine Lord are there in ex- istence? Does the robe which He wore still exist? A. The only relics identified directly with our Divine Lord are the winding robe which He wore in the tomb, the Cross on which He hung, the nails which fatened Him. to the Cross, and a portion of the Crown of Thorns. The robe which He habitually wore has not been preserved. Thanks Be To God We, Thy people and the sheep of Thy flock, will celebrate Thy glory for- ever; From generation to generation we shall sing Thy praises! I shall give thanks in a great as- sembly; in a vast throng I shall praise Thee. He has not done in like manner to every nation. What shall I give to the Lord for all that He gives to me? Excerpts tken from Pmlms 78, , 47, lz. "Quotations Worth 00uoting" Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By Rev. Jomes M. Gillis, C.S.P. Momentous Decision IT should not be necessary to explain again and again that this column does not concern itself with politics. But there are high politics and low politics; politics as an art and science and politics as an ignoble trade. Unfortunately when people in general use the word politics, they don't mean what Aristotle meant, or St. Thomas, or St. Rob- to interfere in'America. He said: ert Bellarmine or Grotius. They ] "By the. policy to which we have don't mean the kind of politics  cohered since the days of Wash- which you "find ling ton, we have done more for in "The Feder- [ the cause "of liberty in the world alist" written I than we could effect by resort to by the men I arms. We have shown to other ha- who selected a., tions the way to greatness and ]happiness. We should adhere to form of gov- ernment for the  our system of peace and avoid the [ Jnited States I distant wars of Europe. We should But when thekeep our lamp burning brightly word-- or the [ on this western shore as a light to subject matter [ all nations, ather than to hazard without t h e I its utter extinction amid the ruins w o r d -- ap- of fallen and 'falling republics in pears in this Europe." column it is Such is the policy which we the nobler, not the baser thing are now asked to abandon. With- that I have in mind. out arguing either for or against the suggestion. I am content to Now comes the necessity of remark that the Amerioan people speaking about what may well be will do well to decide this momen- the most important political ques- tous matter with the utmost care lion that has confronted the peo- :ple since the founding of the Re- and only after mature deliberation., public. The .suggestion has been We shall come back to the ques- i made by no less a person than tion again, and consider the more the President of the United States recent reasons for the contem- that we break a tradition to which plated cbange. we haw adhered since 1783. We are asked to step in and take a If you want to get results, ex- hand in the conflict between po- periment and nature will talk to litical systems in Europe. Hither- ,cu; don't experiment with lead to we have declined to do so. When eenciis. --Thomas A. Edison. the French people dethroned and decapitated their King 'to set up what they called a Republic, but which had little if any resemblance to our Repuhlie, we didn't say nay to them, even though "we had been so greatly indebted to the King that we might never have got started without him. We didn't even say to the regicides, "What you call a Republic is a svage dictatorship, and we don't like it." We minded our own .business. When the so-called Republic was' taken over by Napoleon Bona- parte, and even when he made it an Empire, we kept our mouth shut We did business with him as we had done business with King Louis ,and with the members of the Directory, though these latter were as savage as Hitler or Stalin. It was our prfnciple not to" tell the French.people, or any other people what form of government they should have. We adhered to that .principle with relative if not absolute fi- delity for a hundred years omd more. When we interfered "be- tween Spain and Cuba; afifl Spain and the Philippines, we took pains to explain that we were acting for the sake of philanthropy, not politics. Even so, we did make something of a break With our tradition. In strict accordance with that tradi- tion we would not have interfered even to prevent inhumanity. When the Hungarian patriot Louis t:cssuth came to our shores in 1850 to enlist the sympathy of the American people in his struggle against Austria, he was received with great enthusiasm. He en- listed the support of Daniel Web- .Southern Accent IT'S u long, long way.from Atlanta t9 Shanghai, parti- cularly when there are many fletours en route. How Wil- noth Farmer, graduate of a Methodist college in Georgia's Capital, made the trip has been told so well in The Emory Alum- nus, that it bears repetition: "The 'boys' of '98 should be in- terested to learn that Father Francis Xavier is still sufficiently interested in them to have re- quested recently a list of the names and addresses of the living members of the aid Oxford "class. "The trouble is, most of the old boys will have no idea who Father Francis Xavier is. The name wi!l bring back no memories• While the 'Father' might cuse out-right wonderment among the alumni of Yet II!bmine the World • h i;: (Continhed f.r0m Page 1) shackled by stafidKrdized conven- tions, they saw m ore deeply the mystery of life and ceath. !'::t'% Russian Writers Foretold Struggle ..-,% . Leontiev believeffhe mission of the Russian people ws to beget the hnti-Christ. He foresaw the revolution as a tyrannical and bloody • one, attracting the peoples of the' East and ten going on to annihilate the bourgeois world of the Wet, bringing not the end of the world but the end of the epoch of materialism, natioralism, liber- alism. Pecherin believed that Russi would bring "its om annihilation" for which one would hate his own country for a time, but in the end. it would inaug-drate a new cycle of world history. a small Methodist college.  Pushkin foresaw the possibility "Francis Xavier' is the relig ,, ' " [ of a Russian revblt senseless ,and mus name of the young fellow " ' I merciless" but i the end freedom from Conyers whom they knew I zising on her light-shedding as Wilmth A Farmer He is an l . ,, - ' • • • .  wings. . especmlly " noteworthy person. I Lerm0ntov in his poem Predic- After some 16 years as a Prates [ -lion written in 1830 foretold the taut missionary in Cbiry, he was revolution "The day ll come, for Rus- sia, that drR day $qmn the Tsarsydiadem will fall, and the)', Rabble who loved him once, xli love no more, - And many will ubsist on death and gore, , , Downtrodden law no shelter will provide ':: For child or guiltless woman. Plague will ride From stinking corpses through the grief-strtek land charge of all Jesuit work in I Where fluttering')ra, from cot-" Shanghai, where tages demadd • " his address is 260 Nanzing :Road, c/o the Sacred Help none can g;e!;A famine's Heart Church. gnaing pangs Vill grip the countryside th converted to Catholicism a,nd now serves as a Jesuit priest in that country. "Fri6nds and relatives of Father Farmer lost track of him for many a year, for from the time of Pearl Harbor Iy until last Aug- ust no word was received from him by letter or otherwise. "He had been under Japanese rule since the fall of Shanghai, and from December 1941, to Aug- ust 1945, was interned. At liberty for more than a year now, he is in "The Japanese held the priest 1 in especially close custody because [ he would have been too valuable a I man to their enemies, what with[ his thorough speaking knowledge[ of both Chinese and Japanese. I "lather Farmer has been in' China for 45 years in both Protestant and Catholic work, and lms served in all sections of the vast country. After he had been graduated from Emory and haken ministerial training at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., he became a missionary in 1901 and served the Protestant Church un- til 1917. "Then came his conversion and he left China to study for the priesthood--for seven years in Fnance and England, one at St. Andrew's:on-the- H u d s o n, New York. That was the only occasion on which he was returned to the States since going to the Orient. "Going back to Shanghai in 1925, he has •been based there ever since. But for all his experiences the like of which no other Emory man has undergone, he's un- changed in at least two respects. First he wants to know where his cassmates are and what they're doing. Secondly, to quote a re- turned veteran who recently saw t,'m in Shanghai: "He hasfi't lost his Southern accent one bit'." God. and Your Child By Marie Cecilia McGrath, Ph. D. Devotion As A Habit- HAW you ever thought that it would require almost a miracle for a person whose interests have "been absorbed all week by everything except religious thoughts, to go into Church for a half hour on Sunday and then be able so to control his mind or that he assistg at Mass with devotion and realization ? Our minds do not work that way. We oannot draw out of nothingness, suddenly and th no particular stimulus, a high, degree of interest. There must be prep- aration through what psycholo- gists call association. Spiritual writers speak of this association as. the remote preparation for a particular form of prayer, wheth- er it is hearing Mass, or medita- tion, or any ther type of spiri- tual devotion• We are ahvays slrange and at a loss when on unfamiliar ground. This holds true for interest in God and the ability to converse with Him, as well as for anyone else• Vv'hat can we do about the 'situation practically, you and I and the friends whom we might influence? We know the value of the Mass. We want to hear Sunday Mass worthily and profff- ably. How can we do it? Let us begin with this matter of remote preparation. Are we faithful to morning and night prayers? How do we say them? If we say them inattentively, Joseph, help me! .... O Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in Thee!" Or, you may make up an ejaculation on the spur of the mdment: "My God, I do love you! .... Holy Spirit, this -needs light, so please !" Such aspirations can become a habit and as such, they serve to keep the heart and will close to Our Lrd. CNG THE GLOBE Another big help, especially for insuring that we hear Sunday Mass properly, is to make a little intention in our prayers of unit- ing with all the Masses to be said that day or night• Some simple statement such as, "Sweet Sacred Heart,  unite myself to Thy Sacrifice in all the Masses of today," or "of tonight" would serve this purpose. There are actually, on an average, four ruthless fangs Dawn on the siTdams will shed• a crimson light = And then will be-,re, yealed the Ln of migh t . Whom thott wilt know; and thou wilt underst4ti Wherefore a shying blade is in his hand ..... Sorrow will be the: lot, grief melt thine eyes :' And he will la4gt all thy tears and sighs." Tyrutchev feared the dark ir- rational elements' in Russia would bring a catastrophe and foresaw Christianity as its saving power: "A homeless orphan, man, be- reft of power And naked, stands before the dread abyss, Stands face to face in this his direful hour With its dark emptiness: and all that quickens , Glad things and:light seem now a dream long past; 'Tis unfamiliar tli'gs, unsolved, as darkness fllickens Reveal his fated- heritage at last." . Cheadaev foresaw the triumph of barbarism in' Russia, saying: "It will triumph "not because it is right but because we are wrong." Dostoievsky predicted in his work The Possessed that Russia would undergo the :!'temptation of bread and power" of a godless social teaching/:wierein "Every member of society spies on the others, and it is his. duty to in- form against th ' . . all are slaves, and equal in their slavery. Cicero will have-his: tongue cut ! out, Copernicus Will have his eyes put out, ShakesIeare will be stoned . . . slaves are bound to be equal . . . A teaal, r who laughs with children at t/ir God, and at their cadle is on our side; the lawyer who defends an educated murderer because, he is more cultured than his. victims and could not help murdering them to get money is one Of us; the school boys who murder a peasant for the sake of sensation :are ours; the juries who acqult evel-y criminal are ours; the prosecutor who FEAST Sunday, Marqli : .--St. John Ciimacus, while yery young, made such progress in:qeriing that he Was called the scholastic. :His most noted boolv is: called the "Climax, or Ladder of Perfec- tion.' ..... Monday, March 31.St. Benja- min, deacon and"martyr, su£fered chalices raised each second of the I in Persia during-the persecution day and night. To unite with' under Varanes, grandson of Sa- these elevations of the Sacred [ par III. He w a tortured and Host and Chalice which encircle [ executed in 424. the globe, is to center our mind[ Tuesday, April l.St, ltugn, on Holy Mass as well as to bring [ Bishop of Grenoble, from the cra- us much grace. Idle appeared to,:be:a child at It is possible, too, with a little tbenediction" He/:rigned his Bi- effort,.to recMl.this offering sev- ] shopric and end:red an austere eral times during the day to ; [Abbey but was nyer able to oh- make it as it were, a salute to ] tain -ermission from the HoP Our Lord fronn wherever we may a i " i in litu y ...... : ..... I See th t he mg t de so de. De ]n the mlusI: OI ne worK-a-uayi, .... -;" ' -1-2 world Thi ...... ne oeo on Apr.¢ ±  . • s Is no rouen, nu I[ will make all the difference be-I Wednesday, April 2.---ML Frsn- tween attention and inattention, ] cls of Paula left.hLs home in Cala- devotion and weariness, at Sun- I bria to live as a nit. St. Fran- day Mass. Try it and see. cis workedm miracles and ;rter. But when the question came .Good books like good friends are ! up as to whether we should in-'then our habit will be just the few and chosen, the more select] terfere between Hungary and same inattention at ,Mass on Sun- the more en3oyable Alcott • -- • Austria, Henry Clay, then Secre-. day morning. Our morning and • * * tary of State rejected the sug- night prayers could be fervent Let us be steadfast for Amer- gestion, ones. This is the place to start. ica, work and live for America, His statement is so significant They may not be long prayers, and eternally be on guard to de-ltha t I quote it, in substance. He lbut they must be said with at- e " " fend the Constitution and our ref fred to our ancient policy of tention and devotion. way of living against the virulent [ non-intervention" and mde the Another help is a fervent pray- poison of Communistic ideologT, i point that if we interfere in EU- er now and then during the day: J. clgar Hoover. rope, Europe would have a right "My Jesus, mercy! .... Jesus, Mary, trembles at a trR1 who fears he shall not be advanced enough is ours; among officials and literary men we have lots, and they don't know it themselves . . . We will' "•proclaim destruction, we will set fires going, we will set legends ' going, every scurvy oToup wiH he of use. Well there ql! be an up- heaval; there's going to be such an upset as the world has nev;r seen before Russia will be over- whelmed with darkness, and the earth will weep for its gods." Of The Daa But though he ana others, such as Khomyakov, saw a godless fa- naticism possessing Russia. they nevertheless saw that after pass- ing through this night of dark- ness there would come the dawn when Russia would give the Faith to Europe ,and be the medium of unting Europe and Asia. They did not expect to see that day, but they believed it would come, as Khomyakov said: "We must remember that not -one of us will survive until the time of the harvest, but that our spiritual and ascetic labors .of plowing, sowing and weeding are not for Russia's sake alone, but for the sake of the whole world. This thought alone can give perma- nence to our efforts . . . Russian life holds many treasures, not for "her own people, but for many others, if not for all nations." Soloviev, who died at the close of the last century, declared in the face of Russia's imminent dark- 'hess that "Russia has a religious calling of world wide significance. .In the poverty and humiliation of her people, are the signs of her special vocation. Dostoievsky Pictured a Land Freed From Devils Dostoievsky himself believed that Russia like the young man in the land of the Genasenes- would become filled with devils in the beginning of the twentieth century. "All the sores, all the foul caR-. raglans, all the impurities, all the devils great and small, have mul- fiplied in that great invalid our beloved Russia." But then he believed that a the devil was cast out of the gaunt rnn into the swine, and plunged themselves into the sea/ that the devils of Russia "Will cast themselves down, possessed and raving, from the rocks into the sea, and we shall all be drowned--and a good thing too, for that is all we are fit for, but Russia will be healed ,and will sil: at the feet o? Jesus, and will look upon Him with astonishment." . .. "Sin is a stench, but stench will pass when the sun rises. Sin is transient, Christ is eternal; ou" people are subject to many sins, but they have only one idea, only one true love, and that is Christ."• There are three great qualities " of the Russian soul which war- rant these optimistic forecasts as to the future brilliance of Russia; deep religious feeling, capacity for pain and suffer- ing, and feIlowship. First, deep religious feeling. Atheism is not natural to the Russian. people, it has been art importation from the Western World. The Russian people have never been concerned with the problem of atheism, but only the problem of God's dealing with men in a sinful world. Russian writers and philosophers have seen in their country's persecution of religion, only their vain hope to despise. What is it that gives substance to the violence of their atheism if it be not the reality of the ob- ject which is attacked? Could men espouse prohibition unless there was something to prohibit; could there be anti-Christians un- less there were Christians ? How could there be atheists unless there were something to atheate? I AII atheists would be fools fight- 1 (Continu n  DAYS died at the age of 91 on Good Friday in 1507. : Thnrsday, April 3.--St. Richara, Bishop of Chichester, died in 1253 while preaching against the Sara- cens. Friday, April 4.Isidore, Arch- bishop, was born of a ducal fam- ily at Carthagena in Spain. He succeeded his brother Leander as Archbishop of Seville and success- fully foug]t against the Arian heresy. He died at Seville on April 4, 636, and was declared a Doctor of the Church within 16 years of his death. Saturday, April 5,V i n e en Fetter was called the 'Angel of Judgment.' At the point of death, because of grie over the schs=m afflicting the Church, he was mi- raculously recalled and told to go forth and convert sinners. For 21 years he preached throughout KMrope and converted thousands. He died at Vannes in Brittany in 1.419, Page Four ---" ,- - C ; T H O C I C F,I O R T H W E S T P R O G R E S $ -- Fray, March 28, 1947 "-"" - • " f*TRANOE BUTTRI00 i JUST Clttl,-K,ew,. [,eM' 1,, Cet00,li,l Ueep.Kooted Lhrlstlan: 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle (4), Telephone ssso II 11 r" "./ ;.. f tit • - , Ak -/ Entered as Second- .Class Matter at the Postofflee at Seattle February . ,, T---. , II II r':::llllrrl ";/'11- KI ICCl::l nc IVl::ll/ 6, 1908, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 A Umnue Ilaml  /1JILl ! -Vl • .jjlll ij i • tgV ,- " - "it v il0ROUb 5T01l 5 0F CATH01J Gll / P. O'CONNELJ REV. A_NDR]W' PROUTY (Written by the Rev. Richard 0Jl , Managing Editor Editor; Ginder for the Narberth Iove- Published by the Northwest Progress Co. ment, sponsored by the National President, Most Reverend Gerald Shaughnessy, S.M., S.TDq Council of Catholic Mien.) • Bishop of Seattle The (atholic Northwest Progress performs a vital function T HERE is, in this wide world, a man who claims to be as the official newspaper of our diocese. It is a channel of information and instruction and a bond of uniom The Catholic newspaper suports and de- fends the home, the school and the Church. Our diocesan paper should be read in every Catholic home; it should be studied in every Catholic school, and it should have, as indeed it has, the unqualifiedly loyal support of every priest. Bishop of Seattla The United Nations St• Peter was head of the Apost- les. His name occurs in the Gos- !pels and the /tots oi the Apostles 190 times. The closest runner-up Cannot Extinguish is St. John, the Beloved Disciple. : .... His name is mentioned 29 times. St. Peter's name stands at the of every list of the Apostles Soviet Fire "in Greece to befofindintheScriptures. In fact, of all the Apostles, he was the first to be called by Jesus (Matthew 4, 18; Mark 1, 16; Luke 5, 1). By The Observer ............ . . Our Lord changed this Apostle's AMCIG critical opnnons voiced m connecuon vntn rres,- name from Simon to Cephas, "" ident Trnman's decision to extend American help .to '-hich ts interpreted Peter" (Pe-  ..... n '"  ..... r  xr-sd that  +od of Iter being Greek for rock). The L €, , ".=--'= --   F ' ' ,....,,,...o, i full significance of the change direct United States intervention the United Nations sh0uld]didn't come out until, one day, .... . * . . . Jesus smd to him Thou art Pe have been used to restore peace and order. Although assmt-] • - ance to Greece by no means ter; and upon this rock I will • -- "" ms and is lunteers for action in Greece are k-uild my Church, and the gates of stoves ,:uropean prome ...... ---, ..... *** * "to- the I sougnr Dy me l%v un-ough loc- bell shall not prevail against it. cL,j  l- .... v  m "s  arti s in Poland And I will give thee the keys of Russians at the peripheries of the I_ m_ co mums p a e •. , .... hungary ana omer countries tin- continent, the mtuatmn is so ser-I ..... ious that U. N. intervention at [ uer omec rme. "" - ta e would be cam-II This is me situation the U. N. the presen s g Commission [Enquiry faced. Coin- pletely inadequate. i A U. N. Enquiry Commission[ p°sed of members chosen in already has been sent to the Bal- agreement with the U. 1. routine kans and for almost two months of treating Soviet agents on the the successornot of Jesus Christ, or of St. Paul, or St. Francis; this man claims to I be te successor of St. Peter the Apostle. His claim is honored by 60,000,000 people and -- oddly ehough -- his claim is nowhere contested, as far as we know. There is no one saying a.ywhere, "Not he but I am the successor of St. Peter. He is an impostor. I am the rightful holder of the title." And yet it is an important title. YL must be, to hold the unswerving allegiance of so many millions -- not jusi ignorant people, mind you, but smart people, as welh writers of books, school teachers, invent- ers, composers, sen:tOrs, and the has studied the Greek border con- flict. This writer recently had the opportunity to receive some first hand information on the work of the Commission as well as on the whole aspect of *.he Greek situation with which the Commission is etrusted. These facts bring a picture of Greece as a Soviet tinder box set to blow up in the faces of America and England, along the familiar pattern applied already by Rus- sia in countries of her zone in Europe. Miniature Soviet Rclmblic The communist Earn affd its methods are compared, by observ- ers in Greece, to the Nazis in Germany during their rutlflss campaign prior to Hitler's :tri- umph in 1933. It conducts a con- nt barrage of propaganda and pressure on the population. Eam's action is on a national and inter- national scale, with many agencies in London, Paris and lew York and with the implied assurance that Earn is Greece herself and soon will be in control of the Country. The military arm of the Greek Communists is the so called "De- mocratic Army" otherwise knowr as "bandits." Itis well disciplined, 'e'I-armed and well trained. It acts with great energy and has cceeded in seizing full control of considerable areas of the coun- try, as example Thessaly, where the Greek authorities no longer lave access. Here miniature Sov- t republics have been set up. :" Demoralizing Tactics : The atrocities now heing pei'pe- ti'ated by the "bandits" in North- ern Greece are used by the Com- munists to intimidate the popula- "flora The threat is directed espec- ially against all who helped to save the lives of British soldiers, dlors and airmen during the war. he Greek people, having recent- iy witnessed the slaughter of 65,- 000 of their fellow citizens live lnder constant fear of what is to come. : The legitimate Greek army is "lso a target of communist pene- tration. A conscript army, it ecessarily includes all citizens and the communist element am- ong the soldiers is used by Earn ,O spread treason and defections. here 2s a special communist or- ganization with cells in the army called Kossor, which promotes de- • .eatism and disruption. Now the army has been re-or- ganized and equipped with modern weapons by the British. The new Greek commandos are reported to be picked men with excellent mo- rale and armed with light weap- ons suitable for mountain war- fare. Russh Moves By 300,000 . Parachute Trcops * There is clear evidence of AI-i banian, Yugoslav and Bulgar in- tervention in the Greek civil war• e satellites' pressure on the northern Greek border is strongly upported by a steadily increas- Ing contingent of the Red Army in Bulgaria. Including two recent- y arrived parachute divisiop, it is dd to total 300,000 men. Vol- same basis a,b delegates of inde- pendent nations, this Commission is weak internally. Communits on her staff recognize of course the Soviet member as their only chieT. Seerelriat Sympathetic Towards Conmmnlsm Especially the Secretariat of the Commission was so biased in its pro-Soviet and anti-Greek at- titude, that it has discredited it- self completely. The Secretary is Roescher Lund, a man with notor- ious communist sympathies. The deputy SeCretary is a representa- tive of the Polish puppet regime, "Gottesman. The press officer, Mr. Ryan is a Russian who has ac- the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 16, 18-19). In other words, "Thou art the Rock, and upon this Rock I will build my Church." Later, Jesus told him "I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not; and do thou, when once thou hast turned again, strengthen thy brethren" (Luke 22, 32). And then, after the Resurrec- tion, in a very dramatic way, St.' Peter is told to feed not only the lambs but the sheep of God's flock (John 21, 16-17). So St. Peter was established as -tead of Christ's Church in lan- guage as clear as one could use. ln'd since the Church was to live forever, it would forever be need- ing a visible Head and representa- tive of Christ Jesus, its invisible Head. That Head would be the successor, not of St. John or St. AAdrew, but of St. Peter. That is why we Catholics re- vere and honor our Holy Father-- quired Canaan citizenship. The|because we see in him the succes- remaining assisting secretaries [sor of St. Peter and the Visible are: a Ukrainian Volokhov, Paul- lain a Frenchman and Shearer al-: legedly an Anglo-Saxon. All favor the communist side. • The majority of the Commis- sion, however, is considered to be taking its work seri6usly and im- partially. It is tired of and some* constant propaganda and pressure of the Earn,, which acts as though it were the legitimate Greek state. When the Soviet delegate, to- gether with the Albanian, Yugo- slav and Bulgarian liaison offi- cers, was trying to concentrate the Commission's work only on Greek domestic affairs, this ef- fort failed. Another trick of the Soviet delegate was, when he tried to have the CommiSsion hear the commander of the "Democratic Army", "general" Marko in his capacity as commander, hoping in this way to obts for him inter- national recognition. The commis- sion again refused. Marko was finally invited under his original name Valadis to meet i with a special team of the Cam- !mission, but he failed to appear. This prompted the Russian and "Polish" members to desert the team and proceed for a secret consultation with the "general." With such Trojan Horses in its midst, the Commission, in spite of the hardest efforts of its majority, cannot possibly perform a unmai- mous and constructive, work. If exclusively the U. N. were charged with solving the Greek problem, it would be Russia's vie- tory. Great Thoughts F]gOM I'E  Tiead of Christ's Church. I Question Box Q. Is the Last Gospel really a part of the Mass ? A. The Gospel which is read at the end of the Mas is a devel- opment in the iturgy. Originally the service ended at the "Ite Mis- sa est." The. prayer before the blessing and the blessing by the priest "are private devotions that gradually became a part of the Li- turgical service. The beginning of the Gospel of St. John was much used as a private devotion during the !Tid- die Ages. Sometimes-it was read at Baptism and Extreme Unction. Priests recited it as a prayer of thanksgiving after Mass, a trace of this still being found in the ceremonial for bishops which di- rects that the Bishop was to .be- gin the ast Gospel of the altar and recite while retiring to the throne. At the beginning of the thir- teenth century this Gospel of St. John was said at the altar hy many priests. In 1570 Pope Pins V. made it of universal observa- tion. Q. What genuine relics of our Divine Lord are there in ex- istence? Does the robe which He wore still exist? A. The only relics identified directly with our Divine Lord are the winding robe which He wore in the tomb, the Cross on which He hung, the nails which fatened Him. to the Cross, and a portion of the Crown of Thorns. The robe which He habitually wore has not been preserved. Thanks Be To God We, Thy people and the sheep of Thy flock, will celebrate Thy glory for- ever; From generation to generation we shall sing Thy praises! I shall give thanks in a great as- sembly; in a vast throng I shall praise Thee. He has not done in like manner to every nation. What shall I give to the Lord for all that He gives to me? Excerpts tken from Pmlms 78, , 47, lz. "Quotations Worth 00uoting" Sursum Corda What's Right With the World? By Rev. Jomes M. Gillis, C.S.P. Momentous Decision IT should not be necessary to explain again and again that this column does not concern itself with politics. But there are high politics and low politics; politics as an art and science and politics as an ignoble trade. Unfortunately when people in general use the word politics, they don't mean what Aristotle meant, or St. Thomas, or St. Rob- to interfere in'America. He said: ert Bellarmine or Grotius. They ] "By the. policy to which we have don't mean the kind of politics  cohered since the days of Wash- which you "find ling ton, we have done more for in "The Feder- [ the cause "of liberty in the world alist" written I than we could effect by resort to by the men I arms. We have shown to other ha- who selected a., tions the way to greatness and ]happiness. We should adhere to form of gov- ernment for the  our system of peace and avoid the [ Jnited States I distant wars of Europe. We should But when thekeep our lamp burning brightly word-- or the [ on this western shore as a light to subject matter [ all nations, ather than to hazard without t h e I its utter extinction amid the ruins w o r d -- ap- of fallen and 'falling republics in pears in this Europe." column it is Such is the policy which we the nobler, not the baser thing are now asked to abandon. With- that I have in mind. out arguing either for or against the suggestion. I am content to Now comes the necessity of remark that the Amerioan people speaking about what may well be will do well to decide this momen- the most important political ques- tous matter with the utmost care lion that has confronted the peo- :ple since the founding of the Re- and only after mature deliberation., public. The .suggestion has been We shall come back to the ques- i made by no less a person than tion again, and consider the more the President of the United States recent reasons for the contem- that we break a tradition to which plated cbange. we haw adhered since 1783. We are asked to step in and take a If you want to get results, ex- hand in the conflict between po- periment and nature will talk to litical systems in Europe. Hither- ,cu; don't experiment with lead to we have declined to do so. When eenciis. --Thomas A. Edison. the French people dethroned and decapitated their King 'to set up what they called a Republic, but which had little if any resemblance to our Repuhlie, we didn't say nay to them, even though "we had been so greatly indebted to the King that we might never have got started without him. We didn't even say to the regicides, "What you call a Republic is a svage dictatorship, and we don't like it." We minded our own .business. When the so-called Republic was' taken over by Napoleon Bona- parte, and even when he made it an Empire, we kept our mouth shut We did business with him as we had done business with King Louis ,and with the members of the Directory, though these latter were as savage as Hitler or Stalin. It was our prfnciple not to" tell the French.people, or any other people what form of government they should have. We adhered to that .principle with relative if not absolute fi- delity for a hundred years omd more. When we interfered "be- tween Spain and Cuba; afifl Spain and the Philippines, we took pains to explain that we were acting for the sake of philanthropy, not politics. Even so, we did make something of a break With our tradition. In strict accordance with that tradi- tion we would not have interfered even to prevent inhumanity. When the Hungarian patriot Louis t:cssuth came to our shores in 1850 to enlist the sympathy of the American people in his struggle against Austria, he was received with great enthusiasm. He en- listed the support of Daniel Web- .Southern Accent IT'S u long, long way.from Atlanta t9 Shanghai, parti- cularly when there are many fletours en route. How Wil- noth Farmer, graduate of a Methodist college in Georgia's Capital, made the trip has been told so well in The Emory Alum- nus, that it bears repetition: "The 'boys' of '98 should be in- terested to learn that Father Francis Xavier is still sufficiently interested in them to have re- quested recently a list of the names and addresses of the living members of the aid Oxford "class. "The trouble is, most of the old boys will have no idea who Father Francis Xavier is. The name wi!l bring back no memories• While the 'Father' might cuse out-right wonderment among the alumni of Yet II!bmine the World • h i;: (Continhed f.r0m Page 1) shackled by stafidKrdized conven- tions, they saw m ore deeply the mystery of life and ceath. !'::t'% Russian Writers Foretold Struggle ..-,% . Leontiev believeffhe mission of the Russian people ws to beget the hnti-Christ. He foresaw the revolution as a tyrannical and bloody • one, attracting the peoples of the' East and ten going on to annihilate the bourgeois world of the Wet, bringing not the end of the world but the end of the epoch of materialism, natioralism, liber- alism. Pecherin believed that Russi would bring "its om annihilation" for which one would hate his own country for a time, but in the end. it would inaug-drate a new cycle of world history. a small Methodist college.  Pushkin foresaw the possibility "Francis Xavier' is the relig ,, ' " [ of a Russian revblt senseless ,and mus name of the young fellow " ' I merciless" but i the end freedom from Conyers whom they knew I zising on her light-shedding as Wilmth A Farmer He is an l . ,, - ' • • • .  wings. . especmlly " noteworthy person. I Lerm0ntov in his poem Predic- After some 16 years as a Prates [ -lion written in 1830 foretold the taut missionary in Cbiry, he was revolution "The day ll come, for Rus- sia, that drR day $qmn the Tsarsydiadem will fall, and the)', Rabble who loved him once, xli love no more, - And many will ubsist on death and gore, , , Downtrodden law no shelter will provide ':: For child or guiltless woman. Plague will ride From stinking corpses through the grief-strtek land charge of all Jesuit work in I Where fluttering')ra, from cot-" Shanghai, where tages demadd • " his address is 260 Nanzing :Road, c/o the Sacred Help none can g;e!;A famine's Heart Church. gnaing pangs Vill grip the countryside th converted to Catholicism a,nd now serves as a Jesuit priest in that country. "Fri6nds and relatives of Father Farmer lost track of him for many a year, for from the time of Pearl Harbor Iy until last Aug- ust no word was received from him by letter or otherwise. "He had been under Japanese rule since the fall of Shanghai, and from December 1941, to Aug- ust 1945, was interned. At liberty for more than a year now, he is in "The Japanese held the priest 1 in especially close custody because [ he would have been too valuable a I man to their enemies, what with[ his thorough speaking knowledge[ of both Chinese and Japanese. I "lather Farmer has been in' China for 45 years in both Protestant and Catholic work, and lms served in all sections of the vast country. After he had been graduated from Emory and haken ministerial training at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., he became a missionary in 1901 and served the Protestant Church un- til 1917. "Then came his conversion and he left China to study for the priesthood--for seven years in Fnance and England, one at St. Andrew's:on-the- H u d s o n, New York. That was the only occasion on which he was returned to the States since going to the Orient. "Going back to Shanghai in 1925, he has •been based there ever since. But for all his experiences the like of which no other Emory man has undergone, he's un- changed in at least two respects. First he wants to know where his cassmates are and what they're doing. Secondly, to quote a re- turned veteran who recently saw t,'m in Shanghai: "He hasfi't lost his Southern accent one bit'." God. and Your Child By Marie Cecilia McGrath, Ph. D. Devotion As A Habit- HAW you ever thought that it would require almost a miracle for a person whose interests have "been absorbed all week by everything except religious thoughts, to go into Church for a half hour on Sunday and then be able so to control his mind or that he assistg at Mass with devotion and realization ? Our minds do not work that way. We oannot draw out of nothingness, suddenly and th no particular stimulus, a high, degree of interest. There must be prep- aration through what psycholo- gists call association. Spiritual writers speak of this association as. the remote preparation for a particular form of prayer, wheth- er it is hearing Mass, or medita- tion, or any ther type of spiri- tual devotion• We are ahvays slrange and at a loss when on unfamiliar ground. This holds true for interest in God and the ability to converse with Him, as well as for anyone else• Vv'hat can we do about the 'situation practically, you and I and the friends whom we might influence? We know the value of the Mass. We want to hear Sunday Mass worthily and profff- ably. How can we do it? Let us begin with this matter of remote preparation. Are we faithful to morning and night prayers? How do we say them? If we say them inattentively, Joseph, help me! .... O Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in Thee!" Or, you may make up an ejaculation on the spur of the mdment: "My God, I do love you! .... Holy Spirit, this -needs light, so please !" Such aspirations can become a habit and as such, they serve to keep the heart and will close to Our Lrd. CNG THE GLOBE Another big help, especially for insuring that we hear Sunday Mass properly, is to make a little intention in our prayers of unit- ing with all the Masses to be said that day or night• Some simple statement such as, "Sweet Sacred Heart,  unite myself to Thy Sacrifice in all the Masses of today," or "of tonight" would serve this purpose. There are actually, on an average, four ruthless fangs Dawn on the siTdams will shed• a crimson light = And then will be-,re, yealed the Ln of migh t . Whom thott wilt know; and thou wilt underst4ti Wherefore a shying blade is in his hand ..... Sorrow will be the: lot, grief melt thine eyes :' And he will la4gt all thy tears and sighs." Tyrutchev feared the dark ir- rational elements' in Russia would bring a catastrophe and foresaw Christianity as its saving power: "A homeless orphan, man, be- reft of power And naked, stands before the dread abyss, Stands face to face in this his direful hour With its dark emptiness: and all that quickens , Glad things and:light seem now a dream long past; 'Tis unfamiliar tli'gs, unsolved, as darkness fllickens Reveal his fated- heritage at last." . Cheadaev foresaw the triumph of barbarism in' Russia, saying: "It will triumph "not because it is right but because we are wrong." Dostoievsky predicted in his work The Possessed that Russia would undergo the :!'temptation of bread and power" of a godless social teaching/:wierein "Every member of society spies on the others, and it is his. duty to in- form against th ' . . all are slaves, and equal in their slavery. Cicero will have-his: tongue cut ! out, Copernicus Will have his eyes put out, ShakesIeare will be stoned . . . slaves are bound to be equal . . . A teaal, r who laughs with children at t/ir God, and at their cadle is on our side; the lawyer who defends an educated murderer because, he is more cultured than his. victims and could not help murdering them to get money is one Of us; the school boys who murder a peasant for the sake of sensation :are ours; the juries who acqult evel-y criminal are ours; the prosecutor who FEAST Sunday, Marqli : .--St. John Ciimacus, while yery young, made such progress in:qeriing that he Was called the scholastic. :His most noted boolv is: called the "Climax, or Ladder of Perfec- tion.' ..... Monday, March 31.St. Benja- min, deacon and"martyr, su£fered chalices raised each second of the I in Persia during-the persecution day and night. To unite with' under Varanes, grandson of Sa- these elevations of the Sacred [ par III. He w a tortured and Host and Chalice which encircle [ executed in 424. the globe, is to center our mind[ Tuesday, April l.St, ltugn, on Holy Mass as well as to bring [ Bishop of Grenoble, from the cra- us much grace. Idle appeared to,:be:a child at It is possible, too, with a little tbenediction" He/:rigned his Bi- effort,.to recMl.this offering sev- ] shopric and end:red an austere eral times during the day to ; [Abbey but was nyer able to oh- make it as it were, a salute to ] tain -ermission from the HoP Our Lord fronn wherever we may a i " i in litu y ...... : ..... I See th t he mg t de so de. De ]n the mlusI: OI ne worK-a-uayi, .... -;" ' -1-2 world Thi ...... ne oeo on Apr.¢ ±  . • s Is no rouen, nu I[ will make all the difference be-I Wednesday, April 2.---ML Frsn- tween attention and inattention, ] cls of Paula left.hLs home in Cala- devotion and weariness, at Sun- I bria to live as a nit. St. Fran- day Mass. Try it and see. cis workedm miracles and ;rter. But when the question came .Good books like good friends are ! up as to whether we should in-'then our habit will be just the few and chosen, the more select] terfere between Hungary and same inattention at ,Mass on Sun- the more en3oyable Alcott • -- • Austria, Henry Clay, then Secre-. day morning. Our morning and • * * tary of State rejected the sug- night prayers could be fervent Let us be steadfast for Amer- gestion, ones. This is the place to start. ica, work and live for America, His statement is so significant They may not be long prayers, and eternally be on guard to de-ltha t I quote it, in substance. He lbut they must be said with at- e " " fend the Constitution and our ref fred to our ancient policy of tention and devotion. way of living against the virulent [ non-intervention" and mde the Another help is a fervent pray- poison of Communistic ideologT, i point that if we interfere in EU- er now and then during the day: J. clgar Hoover. rope, Europe would have a right "My Jesus, mercy! .... Jesus, Mary, trembles at a trR1 who fears he shall not be advanced enough is ours; among officials and literary men we have lots, and they don't know it themselves . . . We will' "•proclaim destruction, we will set fires going, we will set legends ' going, every scurvy oToup wiH he of use. Well there ql! be an up- heaval; there's going to be such an upset as the world has nev;r seen before Russia will be over- whelmed with darkness, and the earth will weep for its gods." Of The Daa But though he ana others, such as Khomyakov, saw a godless fa- naticism possessing Russia. they nevertheless saw that after pass- ing through this night of dark- ness there would come the dawn when Russia would give the Faith to Europe ,and be the medium of unting Europe and Asia. They did not expect to see that day, but they believed it would come, as Khomyakov said: "We must remember that not -one of us will survive until the time of the harvest, but that our spiritual and ascetic labors .of plowing, sowing and weeding are not for Russia's sake alone, but for the sake of the whole world. This thought alone can give perma- nence to our efforts . . . Russian life holds many treasures, not for "her own people, but for many others, if not for all nations." Soloviev, who died at the close of the last century, declared in the face of Russia's imminent dark- 'hess that "Russia has a religious calling of world wide significance. .In the poverty and humiliation of her people, are the signs of her special vocation. Dostoievsky Pictured a Land Freed From Devils Dostoievsky himself believed that Russia like the young man in the land of the Genasenes- would become filled with devils in the beginning of the twentieth century. "All the sores, all the foul caR-. raglans, all the impurities, all the devils great and small, have mul- fiplied in that great invalid our beloved Russia." But then he believed that a the devil was cast out of the gaunt rnn into the swine, and plunged themselves into the sea/ that the devils of Russia "Will cast themselves down, possessed and raving, from the rocks into the sea, and we shall all be drowned--and a good thing too, for that is all we are fit for, but Russia will be healed ,and will sil: at the feet o? Jesus, and will look upon Him with astonishment." . .. "Sin is a stench, but stench will pass when the sun rises. Sin is transient, Christ is eternal; ou" people are subject to many sins, but they have only one idea, only one true love, and that is Christ."• There are three great qualities " of the Russian soul which war- rant these optimistic forecasts as to the future brilliance of Russia; deep religious feeling, capacity for pain and suffer- ing, and feIlowship. First, deep religious feeling. Atheism is not natural to the Russian. people, it has been art importation from the Western World. The Russian people have never been concerned with the problem of atheism, but only the problem of God's dealing with men in a sinful world. Russian writers and philosophers have seen in their country's persecution of religion, only their vain hope to despise. What is it that gives substance to the violence of their atheism if it be not the reality of the ob- ject which is attacked? Could men espouse prohibition unless there was something to prohibit; could there be anti-Christians un- less there were Christians ? How could there be atheists unless there were something to atheate? I AII atheists would be fools fight- 1 (Continu n  DAYS died at the age of 91 on Good Friday in 1507. : Thnrsday, April 3.--St. Richara, Bishop of Chichester, died in 1253 while preaching against the Sara- cens. Friday, April 4.Isidore, Arch- bishop, was born of a ducal fam- ily at Carthagena in Spain. He succeeded his brother Leander as Archbishop of Seville and success- fully foug]t against the Arian heresy. He died at Seville on April 4, 636, and was declared a Doctor of the Church within 16 years of his death. Saturday, April 5,V i n e en Fetter was called the 'Angel of Judgment.' At the point of death, because of grie over the schs=m afflicting the Church, he was mi- raculously recalled and told to go forth and convert sinners. For 21 years he preached throughout KMrope and converted thousands. He died at Vannes in Brittany in 1.419,