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Catholic Northwest Progress
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March 28, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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March 28, 1947
 

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.... Friday, March28,194"/ . ....... ........ " .CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS - - = " i i i i i i i i ii i ii i ii i ii - [ :...4 &apos;4 i .:i . " : St. Madin's To t NewManual Arfs Cenier Fdr St. Martin College Build Manual Arts Center " " q Continued from Page 1) ..... .Also to be erec:ea is a new" .... laundry. As .oon as space becomes avail- able in the Manual Arts Center, the basement oi  the main college building will be cleared of its re- creation room and student book- store to make room for the ex- panding physics and chemistry laboratories. Academic Courses Stressed Academic studio, continue to be he primary concern of the Bene- dictines at Lacey, however. The college offers professional - degrees, supplementing the liberal arts training, in general and civil engineering, in business adminis- tration ad journalism. Work in the engineering field will be great- ly facilitated upon completion of the Manual Arts Center since much equipment for these courses will be located there. College Offers Courses In Here is the architect's pendled sketch of the Manual Arts Cehter to be built at St. Martin College, Lacey. The center is being constructed to give coHegia/s opportunity to acquire skills in manual craftsmanship in their spare time ile receiving their col- lege education and to afford g .l.ate r scope to the credit-and class worR for the eagi-. neering degrees offered by the college. New Agriculture Courses in agriculture, pointing to best use of soils axe being offered and will be housed in the new center. - George Risse, maintenance fore- man at the college, is rushing completion of the huge refrigera- tfon plant on the west side of the main building so that he can shift his crew to the work on the Manual Arts structures. The School of Business buildings are being constructed under war surp- lus supervision. buildings  be located off the main col- lege ldll, on the southwest corner Of the large suburban Caaipus. Under construction now are the, classroom ... . . buildings and auditgHtma for the School of Business. These are at top center drawing. The long building (left top) is the first unit of the center prolier. It will be used for warehouse and classroom purlose s. Be- tween the long building and the chssro0m buildings is the present college men's dormi- tory, Benet HaIL At left, with the smoke- stack, is the new laundry building. Other buildings will house classrooms, exhibition halls and special engineering laboratories. q3hina Bishop'.s Escape FrOm Reds Is Saga Packed With Drama ECHNY,. IH., (NC)--P a c k e d with drama the story of the DAFFODIL DINNER IN escape of Bisliop Frmzcis Hoor- ' waarts, S. V. D, of Tsaochowfu PUYAILUP PARISH - from a cunist prison in Chi- . na thrpugh the aid of a group, de- HALL ON SUNDAY scribed as ',endiy communists," " is recounted in the Christian Faro- ..... iy and Our .Iission published ...... here by the Fathers of the Divine PUYALLD-P Women of All t Word. Saints Parish, will sponsor the t annual "Daffodil Dinner," Sunday, t March 30, in the parish hall, and I Ave. S. XV. Serving hours are from I 12 noon to 5 p. m. and roast] turkey will be the main item of the attractive bill of fare. Mrs. Lawrence Kremer is gen- eral chairman. Mrs. John Svoboda has charge of tables, Mrs. Jos. Toynbee of decorations. Mrs.. Gor- don Gross. tickets and publicity, {rs. Frank Kroeper and Mrs. George Latimer of menu. "The daffodil fields are in full .bloom and a glorious sight," says Mrs. Gross "Many people will drive to the valley to see the thousands of acres of blossoms. We invite all to stop by AII Saints hall and enjoy a delicious dinner." Give Your OIL BURNER ABetter Break I AVOID--rbon deposits a n d many unnecessary service calls. USE our scientific MOBILHEAT burner oils. Ntove Oil, Diesel Oil Fuel Oil PACIFIC COAST COAL CO. Oil Division MA. 5080 Also Coal for all purposes. Convenient Credit HARDY'S Incorporated H. F. AROLD,-President F. R. AROLD, Treasurer Jewelers & Silversmitlm Diamond Merchants FILne Watches Glass Ware Pine Street at Fifth Avenue Seattle, 1, HAMMAR OPTOMETRISTS Dr. T. W. Hammar Dr. T. F. Ginnaty ;ome of the details of the 68- year-old Bishop's escape are sup- lied by the prelate, himself, while additional facts were supplied by Bishop Vitua Chang, S V. D., of Sinyangchow. Bishop Hoorwaarts wa arrested by the Reds in the late summer of 1946, and taken from his diocese. He escaped and returned h, diocese early in October. th an amplifier system to enable the 'vast crowds to follow the pro- ceedings. As an example of the false accusations made against him, .the Bishop says, he was charged with buying Church prop- erty and not paying the full price, although the property was purch- ased long before the district came under his jurisdiction. At the same time one of the ,Sisters was accused of treating a patient with the wrong medicine, although at the time of "the patient's illness the Sister had not yet come to China. The Bishop asserts that he suf- ESSAY raZE 60ES TO PROVmENCE ACAOEMY STUDENT fered a torture greater than any in his captivity when he first saw the destruction 'which had been wrought upon his return to his diocese. The Episcopal residence, The comm > " ............. Cathedral and hospital in TSao- ULTnSL lLxtj, LLIJI uv1- the Tsaochowfu ar soon aft- [chowfuo had been stripped bare by the Ja anese surr n- r .. --ithe reds, the prelate says, and all 00oor00:L00 00tes, e %L00n2'S,=00l the mission stations of his 'h" . .___ ........ ]cese had been overrun and looted lie_ the smo,L wz eLL, b " 3" the communists Sx of the sta- first treated m a friendly manner ........ : ..... , lUOS together wlcn cnezr cna o,s, soon their houses schools and oth- P er property were confiscated. ] were burned to the ground. . inspiring talk on religious life. Dragged before a people's court, VANCOUVER. Wash: Norma Collette, senior, .in Providence Ac- ademy, was awarded first priz in the Clark County division of the es- say contest sponsored by Business was awarded first prize, in the Clark County division of the essay contest sponsored by the Business Women's Clubs of America. The subject ,assigned was "Peace Is Our Business." Miss Collette re- ceived a $25 bon& Vocation Week Ftures Speakers During vocation week creers professions, and vocations were presented to the student body by outstanding representatives of var- ious walks of life. Miss Iogen, t instructor of the SL Joseph Nurs- ing School, discussed the nursing profession; Miss Leona Comini. department store buyer, spoke on several aspects of women's work in the business world; Sister Mir- iam Theresa of Marylhurst Col- lge opened vast_horizons to stud- ents interested in social service work; The .Rev. Francis Schae- fers, principal of entral Catholic High School, in Portland, gave an 320 Stewart St. Telephone ELiot 1758 Seattle the Bishop and'a number of his priests and Sisters were accused of having been pro-Japanese and then jailed, he adds. Made Break For Freedom Though kept under strict guard,, two of the Fathers succeeded in making a break for freedom, Bish- op Chang says, taking up the. story, hut they soon were recap- tured and returned to prison. Late in September the prisoners began a novena in honor of St. Theresa, patroness of missionaries, Bishop Chang relates. They prayed for safe deliverance  for themselves and especially for their aged Bish- 'op. On the last day of the novena the group of "friendly commun- ists" made their way into the pri- son and rescued the Bishop. Evading guards they hurried from the lffidn but the Bishop's escape was dtcovered fiuickly. A thorough, search was begun by the troops in charge of the prison. They tipped over every strawstack for miles:. :!.- Crossed Fields on 'All Fours" Only one pile of sorghum stalks in the whole district was left standing. It was located in alarm- yard used as temporary quarkcrs by communist troops, . Bishop Chang relates. 'And it .was u0der this stack that :Bishop Hoorwaarts ested until he could escape during the. darkness. Bishop Hoorwarts said the red soldiers searched for him for nine days and nit.s. He hid during the day, while every village was combed fpr a trace of him, and traveled, oletimes on foo and sometimes "on all fours," at night, cutting acrossflields and avoiding public road,..::Jiventually he made his way back::his See city, which had fallen under nationalist con- trol. . Cruel 'Tf.al' Procedure Bishop Hoorwaarts described the cruel procedure carried on by the communist "people's courts." His trial was held in the open, he re- lates, usually at night, on a stage brightly illuminated and fitted Gleeson and Rock Jewelry Store To Close Good Friday President Orders Ban on Disloyal Employees by U. S. Gteeson & Rock announced, yes- terday, that their jewelry store, at 1510 Westlake Ave., Seattle, will be closed between the hours cg 12 a,nd 3 p. m. on Good Friday. Jerry GleeSon and Clarence Rock proprietors of the firm, both are members of Seattle Council, Knights of Columbus. CATHOLIC CHILDREN'S BOOK CLUB ANNOUNCES APRIL SELECTIONS NEW YORK :-=- The Catholic Children's Book Ciub has an- nounced its April selections as follows: Picture Book Group: "'Benjamin E;usybody," by Irraine Beim; In- termediate Group: "The P.n For- est," by Armstrong Sperry; Older Boys Group: "Galapagos Bound!". bv Felix Reisenberg, Jr.; Older I Cirls Group: "Willow Hill," by ] Phyllis Whitney. 19 Polish Prelate, Prisoner In Two "World Wars, Retires LODZ, Poland-- (NC-Fides)--Ill health, brought about by four years spent in Biecz prison after his arrest by the Gestapo in 1941, has forced the resignation of Arch- bishop" W]odzimierz Jasinski, who read his farewell letter at a Ponti- fical Mass in the i_z Cathedral. As a parish priest at Konin in 1914, he was arrested and im -I prisoned by the Germans in the f#rst World War. Appointed to the See of Lodz in 1 1934, after serving four years as Bishop of Sandomierz. Archbishop Jasisnki gave impetus to the web fare organization, Caritas, and to the Conference of St. Vincent de Paul. He remained at his post until his arrest during the naz.i occupation in World War :II. The Archbishop was freed in May, 1945. Truman's Executive Order Coincides With Revelation of Secret Red Aims In Turkey and Greece iN.C.W.C. News Service) WASHINGTON, March 24. An investigation of the loyalty of civilian employees of the executive branch of the Federal Government has been ordered by President Harry S. Truman. A person will be refused employment, or will be separated from service if already enolled, if all the evidence l CATHOLIC VETERANS - ENDORSE TRUMAN'S , LOYALTY DEMAND i suring only real Americans fill government positions", was en- dorsed today by the Catholic War Veterans, in a wire to President Truman signed by Max H. Soren- sen, CWV national commander. Sorensen also lauded J. Edgar Hoover, FBI Director as the "mas- ter nemesis of anti-American schemers", stating Hoover. was properly selected to lead an inves- tigation of public employees Fr. Conway Lauds President's Foreign Policy Stand NEW YORK. March 25---NC) Fresident Truman's appeal to on-{ gress for aid to Greece and Tur-] key was hailed as a "courageous I challenge to an expanding com- munism" and called the 'g rarest peace-time pronouncement an Am- erican president has ever made" by" the Rev. EcLward A. Conway, S. J.. of St. Louis Ur/iversity, on the Church of the Air program broadcast by the Columbia Broad- casting System. I Father Conway, formerly with [the Social Action Department. na- [tional Catholic Welfare confer- fence, declared that the present in- ternational crisis is not just one of power politics or economic clashes but a spiritual crisis. He added: "The struggle which car resoheO, it must be waged princi- rally on the spiritual plane." U.S. Isolation Now Would Play Into Red Hands Says Fr. Cronin NEW YORK, March 2.--(NC) Analyzing the stand taken by former Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy that economic aid to stop Sc-viet imperialism wod so im- poverish the United States that this country would be an easy prey to communism, and that Soviet ex- pansion would be self-defeating be- cause it would disillusion the peo- ple. the Rev. John F. Cronin, S. S.. Assistant Director of the National Catholic Welfare Conference, de- clared such a policy would turn Europe over to the Reds by de- f=mlt. He made the statement in a letter to the New York TLmes. Father Croni expressed doubt l that dmllumnment wo " '"  " uld check ] the expansion of the Soviet. '"The Ukraine has long since] I been disillusioned, but the only] resolt is ever more severe and ravage purges and reprisals, he concluded. Leaders A Camas-Van couver K. of C. Meeting Photo by Bill Cardiner Leadersat the Comas-Vancouver Knights of Columbus meeting were (left to right in photo) : Bob Moisant, gran d knight of the Camas-Washougal council; John Herb, grand knight of Vancouvvr; George Hofner, K. C. state deputy; Very Rev. Joph P. Dougherty, K. of C. state chaplain and E. Denby Browne, district deputy. m the case shows "reasonable grounds exist for belief that the person is disloyal to the Govern- ment of the United States." Following quickly upon this announcement, the State 1)e- partmcnL under ressure from a Congres considering {he Presi- dent's call for aid to Greece and Turkey, removed the "secret" label from a document which re- vealed the following: That there is "a master plan" abroad which would -separate M,accdonia from Greece and "make untenable any Greek government not subsewient to Communist aims" and that part of this plan is tbe "armed band activities di- rected and assisted from outside the country," wbich arc causing so much trouble in Greece today. That "the Soviet member of the U. N. Commission, aided by his Polish satellite." has done "everything possible to place "Greece in an unfavorable light and place the blame for fron- tier clashes on the Greek gov- ernment. Reference to Poland as a "sateI- lite" of Russia in a document of this sort is considered of particu- lar importance here. That the "Moscow press and radio constantly vilify the 'fascist' regime in Turkey, and Turkish language broadcasts from Radio Moscow even go so far as to call upon the people of Turkey to rise in revolt ,and overthrow their gov- ernment." Coincident with these develop- ments, two admitted former Com- munists told the House of Repre- [ sentatives Comw.ittee on Un- American Activities a Soviet spy ring and a ring fMsifying pass- ports for the benefit of Commu- nists wishing to enter or leave the country are busy in this country The witnesses, Liston M. Oak, and Fred Beal. said Leo.n Jos- ephson of New York is a mem- ber of the Russian secret polk'e, and that he may be "more im- portant" than Gerhard Eisler in the Communist movement in this country. The House Un- American Committee cited Mr. Josephson for contempt, as an outgrowth of his refusal to tes- tify before a sub-committee. President Trunan's order on loyalty investigations directs that all available pertinent sources of information F.B.I. armed servi- ces, Civil Service Commission and other files are to be utilized. CATHOLIC FANEBS OFFERED QUIDANCE IN RURAL HAHEiBOOK lia "Title Serwice HAVE YOU OUTGROWN THE OLD HOME? This spring many families are building or buying homes. Perhaps, you are planning on changing to a new or better home. Consult 3,our realtorbut when you buy--insist on TITLE INSURANCE issued by-- WASHINGTON TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY cat, Szso,ooo Agent - _ : SEATTLE TITLE COMPANY 803 Second Avenue, Seattle 4 MAIn 1534 L. S. Booth, Chairman Charlton L. Hail, President "Demand the Best- It Costs No More" STOUT'S VARIETY 5 and lO-ent STORE 2221 N. 56th St. SHOP AT STOUT'S FOR EASTER CARDS Candles, Baskets, Party Needs and Gifts, Yes, we have Bias Tape, Rick-Rack Seam Binding. Per Package 10c Oil Cloth, 4 Patterns,-per yard .................... 59c and 75e nite Shelf Liners ............  .......................................... .22e Pink and Rose Shelf Liners .................................... 12c Shelf Paper, Beautiful Patterns ........................  ......... ,Be Fuse Plugs, Household Cleaners, Paints, Brushes and Sprayers Lady Jackson Electric Ironers, $10.45 including tax NOW TWO STORES FOR YOUR EASTER CONVENIENCE Easter LiliesAII Other Kinds of Potted Plants (}RDER EARLY FOR CORSAGES UPTOWN FLORIST 530 Queen Anne Ave. CA. 3342 SUNBRIGHT FLORIST 452 12thAvenue CA. 9980 DAFFODIL TURKEY DINNER SUNDAY, MARCH 30 12 Noon to 5 P. M. Adults $1.25 DENVEr-:.--r>;C, -The prob- lems f thc 20tl century American farmer :.ere sf. dmd thoroughly in the "Ariultur] Handbook for Rural Pastors and Laymen," said to be the first handbook of its lfami!y type farm, the evils of kind to be disseminated uder i commercialized agriculture, rural Catholic ,auspices in America. I rebabilitatin' ruralsoft erosiOn,youth farm Intended as a guide to a solidi c-peratives' prob- lems ,and the teachings of the agrarian structure in this coun- t Popes. ! try, the handbook, sponsored by the National Catholic Rural Life Conference a n d prepared by Thomas E. Howarc: Denvdr of- fiel,al in the Departmont of Agri- culture, has been praised by Secre- tary of Agriculture Clinton P." Anderson and Bishop Aloysius J. Muench of Fargo (N.D.), Episco- pal adviser to the NCRLC." Covers ,Many Sub.]ex.s CartTing the mb-title "Relig- ious. Economic, Social and Cul- tural Implication of Rural Life," the book doe not limit itself to basic farm problems It discusses the NCRLC, what it is and who corrjpose it; the responsibilities at the rural pastor, what the De- partment of Agriculture is doing for the American farmer, the Af'I'lfl'', .1. O'SULLIVAN, 12t;' .mvrican Building, Seattle I. t,Vsh|ttgtor IN "!'lie SUH,'nlOi COURT OP" "fifE' S;:t*, ,,f Wa:,hm.vnn fnr t),o C'rllnty of 14il;2. - fn P:obat- In he M;dt('! of .he E:dalr- el" (; W Rr)hrlff, rr-of, a,'rl.- NO. lOl.}9.--r'iohco h (Zred,to ,. NoIcr" is hcFr'.by P. IV'I! that h r* tin- ] dr:; apprlirtcd arid }-iaa bc:en i fl;i/} "; a. EXr'(:I,tF ff Ihe ,tate of r: \\;V l',]hrl2, rIo,:!:-ed ha . I " p-r- <-r,\< hav;n -LsIJr:q'4 ;aJD./ :;;]rl rio-  { C;l:od :r r hr'r'r'i)V I'C(|lijrc,'d to eyvr, hn .om 140 members of the Van- i throughout the nation and spcc]- of Vancouver; Pev. Joseph Vo;gel sarae, duly w.ri'fir:ci, on :said Carl B. couver a n d Camas-Washougal i finally on the work being done in i (,f Sacred Heart Parish in Battle: winae or hi:: attrrmv of record a' lhe a'Adres -rjloI,." stated, and file the same Councils assembled in the parish our own State. ;Ground and the chaplain of Coun-i v:ith the Clerk of said Court. together hall on Wednesday of last week to ell 2999 of Calnas, Rev. Edward with proof of such service within six ..rnontb after the date of first pub!tea- welcome tl.eir state chaplain, Rev., A chorus of girls from the Haves were also in attenclanee, tie. of this notice, or the same will be harr.d. Father Joseph r-.ougnerty, Chart- Academy sang several numbers. The council expressed gratitude! Frt nublioa!on 5arch 7, 1947. !caller of the Divine, and State l Among the c:crgy present were to the committee frc m the Y.L.I i. CARL B. WINGE. Eecu'.or of said Estate Address 1212 American Build- Deputy George Hofner. Rev. John Ean, chaplain of Van-l beaded by Pauline am. who Phrail in Seam< Wwh FaTher Dbuherty ,poko oll the ec.wver ccunell, Rov.-Cannot -Me- I paved -the splendid luncheon ARTHUR J O'SULLIVAN. Attorney [ \\;iork ol [he I(zdghts of I_', lu dsu I G.vecvy ad Ilev. l,'r McNerncy, all wa.; :wzve,l ] r,,r i2. tnlr-. 1?1; Am,'rieqn P.Id;, , E.nl- [|*: 1',1 = Jl ALL SAINTS PARISH HALL 2nd Avenue S. W.Puyallup The handbook was printed at the St. Anthony Guild Pre of I the Franciscan Monastery, Pater- I son, N. J., and is being distributed [ there and at NCRI. headquarters [in Des Moines, Iowa. HiLL TOP CAff 410 -- 15th Ave. N. CApitol 9739 WE WISH TO ANNOUNCE WE WILL BE OPEN SUNDAYS FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCHES From9to2 P.M. i i , , , i i , ,,, WHEN IT'S FURNITURE... Rugs or Electrical Appliances you need it will pay you to shop first at that big Furniture Store in the University District. GRINNELL & McLEAN HOME FURNIsHERS 43!5 l:oiversify Way IE. 5400 ATTIC r BASEMENT ROOMS RE-MODELED, FREE ESTIMAT] Paymenis of $12.46 Per Month, ]Per lom of &verage ALBERT WESOLOWSKI ontractor Est .... Friday, March28,194"/ . ....... ........ " .CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS - - = " i i i i i i i i ii i ii i ii i ii - [ :...4 '4 i .:i . " : St. Madin's To t NewManual Arfs Cenier Fdr St. Martin College Build Manual Arts Center " " q Continued from Page 1) ..... .Also to be erec:ea is a new" .... laundry. As .oon as space becomes avail- able in the Manual Arts Center, the basement oi  the main college building will be cleared of its re- creation room and student book- store to make room for the ex- panding physics and chemistry laboratories. Academic Courses Stressed Academic studio, continue to be he primary concern of the Bene- dictines at Lacey, however. The college offers professional - degrees, supplementing the liberal arts training, in general and civil engineering, in business adminis- tration ad journalism. Work in the engineering field will be great- ly facilitated upon completion of the Manual Arts Center since much equipment for these courses will be located there. College Offers Courses In Here is the architect's pendled sketch of the Manual Arts Cehter to be built at St. Martin College, Lacey. The center is being constructed to give coHegia/s opportunity to acquire skills in manual craftsmanship in their spare time ile receiving their col- lege education and to afford g .l.ate r scope to the credit-and class worR for the eagi-. neering degrees offered by the college. New Agriculture Courses in agriculture, pointing to best use of soils axe being offered and will be housed in the new center. - George Risse, maintenance fore- man at the college, is rushing completion of the huge refrigera- tfon plant on the west side of the main building so that he can shift his crew to the work on the Manual Arts structures. The School of Business buildings are being constructed under war surp- lus supervision. buildings  be located off the main col- lege ldll, on the southwest corner Of the large suburban Caaipus. Under construction now are the, classroom ... . . buildings and auditgHtma for the School of Business. These are at top center drawing. The long building (left top) is the first unit of the center prolier. It will be used for warehouse and classroom purlose s. Be- tween the long building and the chssro0m buildings is the present college men's dormi- tory, Benet HaIL At left, with the smoke- stack, is the new laundry building. Other buildings will house classrooms, exhibition halls and special engineering laboratories. q3hina Bishop'.s Escape FrOm Reds Is Saga Packed With Drama ECHNY,. IH., (NC)--P a c k e d with drama the story of the DAFFODIL DINNER IN escape of Bisliop Frmzcis Hoor- ' waarts, S. V. D, of Tsaochowfu PUYAILUP PARISH - from a cunist prison in Chi- . na thrpugh the aid of a group, de- HALL ON SUNDAY scribed as ',endiy communists," " is recounted in the Christian Faro- ..... iy and Our .Iission published ...... here by the Fathers of the Divine PUYALLD-P Women of All t Word. Saints Parish, will sponsor the t annual "Daffodil Dinner," Sunday, t March 30, in the parish hall, and I Ave. S. XV. Serving hours are from I 12 noon to 5 p. m. and roast] turkey will be the main item of the attractive bill of fare. Mrs. Lawrence Kremer is gen- eral chairman. Mrs. John Svoboda has charge of tables, Mrs. Jos. Toynbee of decorations. Mrs.. Gor- don Gross. tickets and publicity, {rs. Frank Kroeper and Mrs. George Latimer of menu. "The daffodil fields are in full .bloom and a glorious sight," says Mrs. Gross "Many people will drive to the valley to see the thousands of acres of blossoms. We invite all to stop by AII Saints hall and enjoy a delicious dinner." Give Your OIL BURNER ABetter Break I AVOID--rbon deposits a n d many unnecessary service calls. USE our scientific MOBILHEAT burner oils. Ntove Oil, Diesel Oil Fuel Oil PACIFIC COAST COAL CO. Oil Division MA. 5080 Also Coal for all purposes. Convenient Credit HARDY'S Incorporated H. F. AROLD,-President F. R. AROLD, Treasurer Jewelers & Silversmitlm Diamond Merchants FILne Watches Glass Ware Pine Street at Fifth Avenue Seattle, 1, HAMMAR OPTOMETRISTS Dr. T. W. Hammar Dr. T. F. Ginnaty ;ome of the details of the 68- year-old Bishop's escape are sup- lied by the prelate, himself, while additional facts were supplied by Bishop Vitua Chang, S V. D., of Sinyangchow. Bishop Hoorwaarts wa arrested by the Reds in the late summer of 1946, and taken from his diocese. He escaped and returned h, diocese early in October. th an amplifier system to enable the 'vast crowds to follow the pro- ceedings. As an example of the false accusations made against him, .the Bishop says, he was charged with buying Church prop- erty and not paying the full price, although the property was purch- ased long before the district came under his jurisdiction. At the same time one of the ,Sisters was accused of treating a patient with the wrong medicine, although at the time of "the patient's illness the Sister had not yet come to China. The Bishop asserts that he suf- ESSAY raZE 60ES TO PROVmENCE ACAOEMY STUDENT fered a torture greater than any in his captivity when he first saw the destruction 'which had been wrought upon his return to his diocese. The Episcopal residence, The comm > " ............. Cathedral and hospital in TSao- ULTnSL lLxtj, LLIJI uv1- the Tsaochowfu ar soon aft- [chowfuo had been stripped bare by the Ja anese surr n- r .. --ithe reds, the prelate says, and all 00oor00:L00 00tes, e %L00n2'S,=00l the mission stations of his 'h" . .___ ........ ]cese had been overrun and looted lie_ the smo,L wz eLL, b " 3" the communists Sx of the sta- first treated m a friendly manner ........ : ..... , lUOS together wlcn cnezr cna o,s, soon their houses schools and oth- P er property were confiscated. ] were burned to the ground. . inspiring talk on religious life. Dragged before a people's court, VANCOUVER. Wash: Norma Collette, senior, .in Providence Ac- ademy, was awarded first priz in the Clark County division of the es- say contest sponsored by Business was awarded first prize, in the Clark County division of the essay contest sponsored by the Business Women's Clubs of America. The subject ,assigned was "Peace Is Our Business." Miss Collette re- ceived a $25 bon& Vocation Week Ftures Speakers During vocation week creers professions, and vocations were presented to the student body by outstanding representatives of var- ious walks of life. Miss Iogen, t instructor of the SL Joseph Nurs- ing School, discussed the nursing profession; Miss Leona Comini. department store buyer, spoke on several aspects of women's work in the business world; Sister Mir- iam Theresa of Marylhurst Col- lge opened vast_horizons to stud- ents interested in social service work; The .Rev. Francis Schae- fers, principal of entral Catholic High School, in Portland, gave an 320 Stewart St. Telephone ELiot 1758 Seattle the Bishop and'a number of his priests and Sisters were accused of having been pro-Japanese and then jailed, he adds. Made Break For Freedom Though kept under strict guard,, two of the Fathers succeeded in making a break for freedom, Bish- op Chang says, taking up the. story, hut they soon were recap- tured and returned to prison. Late in September the prisoners began a novena in honor of St. Theresa, patroness of missionaries, Bishop Chang relates. They prayed for safe deliverance  for themselves and especially for their aged Bish- 'op. On the last day of the novena the group of "friendly commun- ists" made their way into the pri- son and rescued the Bishop. Evading guards they hurried from the lffidn but the Bishop's escape was dtcovered fiuickly. A thorough, search was begun by the troops in charge of the prison. They tipped over every strawstack for miles:. :!.- Crossed Fields on 'All Fours" Only one pile of sorghum stalks in the whole district was left standing. It was located in alarm- yard used as temporary quarkcrs by communist troops, . Bishop Chang relates. 'And it .was u0der this stack that :Bishop Hoorwaarts ested until he could escape during the. darkness. Bishop Hoorwarts said the red soldiers searched for him for nine days and nit.s. He hid during the day, while every village was combed fpr a trace of him, and traveled, oletimes on foo and sometimes "on all fours," at night, cutting acrossflields and avoiding public road,..::Jiventually he made his way back::his See city, which had fallen under nationalist con- trol. . Cruel 'Tf.al' Procedure Bishop Hoorwaarts described the cruel procedure carried on by the communist "people's courts." His trial was held in the open, he re- lates, usually at night, on a stage brightly illuminated and fitted Gleeson and Rock Jewelry Store To Close Good Friday President Orders Ban on Disloyal Employees by U. S. Gteeson & Rock announced, yes- terday, that their jewelry store, at 1510 Westlake Ave., Seattle, will be closed between the hours cg 12 a,nd 3 p. m. on Good Friday. Jerry GleeSon and Clarence Rock proprietors of the firm, both are members of Seattle Council, Knights of Columbus. CATHOLIC CHILDREN'S BOOK CLUB ANNOUNCES APRIL SELECTIONS NEW YORK :-=- The Catholic Children's Book Ciub has an- nounced its April selections as follows: Picture Book Group: "'Benjamin E;usybody," by Irraine Beim; In- termediate Group: "The P.n For- est," by Armstrong Sperry; Older Boys Group: "Galapagos Bound!". bv Felix Reisenberg, Jr.; Older I Cirls Group: "Willow Hill," by ] Phyllis Whitney. 19 Polish Prelate, Prisoner In Two "World Wars, Retires LODZ, Poland-- (NC-Fides)--Ill health, brought about by four years spent in Biecz prison after his arrest by the Gestapo in 1941, has forced the resignation of Arch- bishop" W]odzimierz Jasinski, who read his farewell letter at a Ponti- fical Mass in the i_z Cathedral. As a parish priest at Konin in 1914, he was arrested and im -I prisoned by the Germans in the f#rst World War. Appointed to the See of Lodz in 1 1934, after serving four years as Bishop of Sandomierz. Archbishop Jasisnki gave impetus to the web fare organization, Caritas, and to the Conference of St. Vincent de Paul. He remained at his post until his arrest during the naz.i occupation in World War :II. The Archbishop was freed in May, 1945. Truman's Executive Order Coincides With Revelation of Secret Red Aims In Turkey and Greece iN.C.W.C. News Service) WASHINGTON, March 24. An investigation of the loyalty of civilian employees of the executive branch of the Federal Government has been ordered by President Harry S. Truman. A person will be refused employment, or will be separated from service if already enolled, if all the evidence l CATHOLIC VETERANS - ENDORSE TRUMAN'S , LOYALTY DEMAND i suring only real Americans fill government positions", was en- dorsed today by the Catholic War Veterans, in a wire to President Truman signed by Max H. Soren- sen, CWV national commander. Sorensen also lauded J. Edgar Hoover, FBI Director as the "mas- ter nemesis of anti-American schemers", stating Hoover. was properly selected to lead an inves- tigation of public employees Fr. Conway Lauds President's Foreign Policy Stand NEW YORK. March 25---NC) Fresident Truman's appeal to on-{ gress for aid to Greece and Tur-] key was hailed as a "courageous I challenge to an expanding com- munism" and called the 'g rarest peace-time pronouncement an Am- erican president has ever made" by" the Rev. EcLward A. Conway, S. J.. of St. Louis Ur/iversity, on the Church of the Air program broadcast by the Columbia Broad- casting System. I Father Conway, formerly with [the Social Action Department. na- [tional Catholic Welfare confer- fence, declared that the present in- ternational crisis is not just one of power politics or economic clashes but a spiritual crisis. He added: "The struggle which car resoheO, it must be waged princi- rally on the spiritual plane." U.S. Isolation Now Would Play Into Red Hands Says Fr. Cronin NEW YORK, March 2.--(NC) Analyzing the stand taken by former Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy that economic aid to stop Sc-viet imperialism wod so im- poverish the United States that this country would be an easy prey to communism, and that Soviet ex- pansion would be self-defeating be- cause it would disillusion the peo- ple. the Rev. John F. Cronin, S. S.. Assistant Director of the National Catholic Welfare Conference, de- clared such a policy would turn Europe over to the Reds by de- f=mlt. He made the statement in a letter to the New York TLmes. Father Croni expressed doubt l that dmllumnment wo " '"  " uld check ] the expansion of the Soviet. '"The Ukraine has long since] I been disillusioned, but the only] resolt is ever more severe and ravage purges and reprisals, he concluded. Leaders A Camas-Van couver K. of C. Meeting Photo by Bill Cardiner Leadersat the Comas-Vancouver Knights of Columbus meeting were (left to right in photo) : Bob Moisant, gran d knight of the Camas-Washougal council; John Herb, grand knight of Vancouvvr; George Hofner, K. C. state deputy; Very Rev. Joph P. Dougherty, K. of C. state chaplain and E. Denby Browne, district deputy. m the case shows "reasonable grounds exist for belief that the person is disloyal to the Govern- ment of the United States." Following quickly upon this announcement, the State 1)e- partmcnL under ressure from a Congres considering {he Presi- dent's call for aid to Greece and Turkey, removed the "secret" label from a document which re- vealed the following: That there is "a master plan" abroad which would -separate M,accdonia from Greece and "make untenable any Greek government not subsewient to Communist aims" and that part of this plan is tbe "armed band activities di- rected and assisted from outside the country," wbich arc causing so much trouble in Greece today. That "the Soviet member of the U. N. Commission, aided by his Polish satellite." has done "everything possible to place "Greece in an unfavorable light and place the blame for fron- tier clashes on the Greek gov- ernment. Reference to Poland as a "sateI- lite" of Russia in a document of this sort is considered of particu- lar importance here. That the "Moscow press and radio constantly vilify the 'fascist' regime in Turkey, and Turkish language broadcasts from Radio Moscow even go so far as to call upon the people of Turkey to rise in revolt ,and overthrow their gov- ernment." Coincident with these develop- ments, two admitted former Com- munists told the House of Repre- [ sentatives Comw.ittee on Un- American Activities a Soviet spy ring and a ring fMsifying pass- ports for the benefit of Commu- nists wishing to enter or leave the country are busy in this country The witnesses, Liston M. Oak, and Fred Beal. said Leo.n Jos- ephson of New York is a mem- ber of the Russian secret polk'e, and that he may be "more im- portant" than Gerhard Eisler in the Communist movement in this country. The House Un- American Committee cited Mr. Josephson for contempt, as an outgrowth of his refusal to tes- tify before a sub-committee. President Trunan's order on loyalty investigations directs that all available pertinent sources of information F.B.I. armed servi- ces, Civil Service Commission and other files are to be utilized. CATHOLIC FANEBS OFFERED QUIDANCE IN RURAL HAHEiBOOK lia "Title Serwice HAVE YOU OUTGROWN THE OLD HOME? This spring many families are building or buying homes. Perhaps, you are planning on changing to a new or better home. Consult 3,our realtorbut when you buy--insist on TITLE INSURANCE issued by-- WASHINGTON TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY cat, Szso,ooo Agent - _ : SEATTLE TITLE COMPANY 803 Second Avenue, Seattle 4 MAIn 1534 L. S. Booth, Chairman Charlton L. Hail, President "Demand the Best- It Costs No More" STOUT'S VARIETY 5 and lO-ent STORE 2221 N. 56th St. SHOP AT STOUT'S FOR EASTER CARDS Candles, Baskets, Party Needs and Gifts, Yes, we have Bias Tape, Rick-Rack Seam Binding. Per Package 10c Oil Cloth, 4 Patterns,-per yard .................... 59c and 75e nite Shelf Liners ............  .......................................... .22e Pink and Rose Shelf Liners .................................... 12c Shelf Paper, Beautiful Patterns ........................  ......... ,Be Fuse Plugs, Household Cleaners, Paints, Brushes and Sprayers Lady Jackson Electric Ironers, $10.45 including tax NOW TWO STORES FOR YOUR EASTER CONVENIENCE Easter LiliesAII Other Kinds of Potted Plants (}RDER EARLY FOR CORSAGES UPTOWN FLORIST 530 Queen Anne Ave. CA. 3342 SUNBRIGHT FLORIST 452 12thAvenue CA. 9980 DAFFODIL TURKEY DINNER SUNDAY, MARCH 30 12 Noon to 5 P. M. Adults $1.25 DENVEr-:.--r>;C, -The prob- lems f thc 20tl century American farmer :.ere sf. dmd thoroughly in the "Ariultur] Handbook for Rural Pastors and Laymen," said to be the first handbook of its lfami!y type farm, the evils of kind to be disseminated uder i commercialized agriculture, rural Catholic ,auspices in America. I rebabilitatin' ruralsoft erosiOn,youth farm Intended as a guide to a solidi c-peratives' prob- lems ,and the teachings of the agrarian structure in this coun- t Popes. ! try, the handbook, sponsored by the National Catholic Rural Life Conference a n d prepared by Thomas E. Howarc: Denvdr of- fiel,al in the Departmont of Agri- culture, has been praised by Secre- tary of Agriculture Clinton P." Anderson and Bishop Aloysius J. Muench of Fargo (N.D.), Episco- pal adviser to the NCRLC." Covers ,Many Sub.]ex.s CartTing the mb-title "Relig- ious. Economic, Social and Cul- tural Implication of Rural Life," the book doe not limit itself to basic farm problems It discusses the NCRLC, what it is and who corrjpose it; the responsibilities at the rural pastor, what the De- partment of Agriculture is doing for the American farmer, the Af'I'lfl'', .1. O'SULLIVAN, 12t;' .mvrican Building, Seattle I. t,Vsh|ttgtor IN "!'lie SUH,'nlOi COURT OP" "fifE' S;:t*, ,,f Wa:,hm.vnn fnr t),o C'rllnty of 14il;2. - fn P:obat- In he M;dt('! of .he E:dalr- el" (; W Rr)hrlff, rr-of, a,'rl.- NO. lOl.}9.--r'iohco h (Zred,to ,. NoIcr" is hcFr'.by P. IV'I! that h r* tin- ] dr:; apprlirtcd arid }-iaa bc:en i fl;i/} "; a. EXr'(:I,tF ff Ihe ,tate of r: \\;V l',]hrl2, rIo,:!:-ed ha . I " p-r- <-r,\< hav;n -LsIJr:q'4 ;aJD./ :;;]rl rio-  { C;l:od :r r hr'r'r'i)V I'C(|lijrc,'d to eyvr, hn .om 140 members of the Van- i throughout the nation and spcc]- of Vancouver; Pev. Joseph Vo;gel sarae, duly w.ri'fir:ci, on :said Carl B. couver a n d Camas-Washougal i finally on the work being done in i (,f Sacred Heart Parish in Battle: winae or hi:: attrrmv of record a' lhe a'Adres -rjloI,." stated, and file the same Councils assembled in the parish our own State. ;Ground and the chaplain of Coun-i v:ith the Clerk of said Court. together hall on Wednesday of last week to ell 2999 of Calnas, Rev. Edward with proof of such service within six ..rnontb after the date of first pub!tea- welcome tl.eir state chaplain, Rev., A chorus of girls from the Haves were also in attenclanee, tie. of this notice, or the same will be harr.d. Father Joseph r-.ougnerty, Chart- Academy sang several numbers. The council expressed gratitude! Frt nublioa!on 5arch 7, 1947. !caller of the Divine, and State l Among the c:crgy present were to the committee frc m the Y.L.I i. CARL B. WINGE. Eecu'.or of said Estate Address 1212 American Build- Deputy George Hofner. Rev. John Ean, chaplain of Van-l beaded by Pauline am. who Phrail in Seam< Wwh FaTher Dbuherty ,poko oll the ec.wver ccunell, Rov.-Cannot -Me- I paved -the splendid luncheon ARTHUR J O'SULLIVAN. Attorney [\\;iork ol [he I(zdghts of I_', lu dsu I G.vecvy ad Ilev. l,'r McNerncy, all wa.; :wzve,l ] r,,r i2. tnlr-. 1?1; Am,'rieqn P.Id;, , E.nl- [|*: 1',1 = Jl ALL SAINTS PARISH HALL 2nd Avenue S. W.Puyallup The handbook was printed at the St. Anthony Guild Pre of I the Franciscan Monastery, Pater- I son, N. J., and is being distributed [ there and at NCRI. headquarters [in Des Moines, Iowa. HiLL TOP CAff 410 -- 15th Ave. N. CApitol 9739 WE WISH TO ANNOUNCE WE WILL BE OPEN SUNDAYS FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCHES From9to2 P.M. i i , , , i i , ,,, WHEN IT'S FURNITURE... Rugs or Electrical Appliances you need it will pay you to shop first at that big Furniture Store in the University District. GRINNELL & McLEAN HOME FURNIsHERS 43!5 l:oiversify Way IE. 5400 ATTIC r BASEMENT ROOMS RE-MODELED, FREE ESTIMAT] Paymenis of $12.46 Per Month, ]Per lom of &verage ALBERT WESOLOWSKI ontractor Est .... Friday, March28,194"/ . ....... ........ " .CATHOLIC NORTHWEST PROGRESS - - = " i i i i i i i i ii i ii i ii i ii - [ :...4 '4 i .:i . " : St. Madin's To t NewManual Arfs Cenier Fdr St. Martin College Build Manual Arts Center " " q Continued from Page 1) ..... .Also to be erec:ea is a new" .... laundry. As .oon as space becomes avail- able in the Manual Arts Center, the basement oi  the main college building will be cleared of its re- creation room and student book- store to make room for the ex- panding physics and chemistry laboratories. Academic Courses Stressed Academic studio, continue to be he primary concern of the Bene- dictines at Lacey, however. The college offers professional - degrees, supplementing the liberal arts training, in general and civil engineering, in business adminis- tration ad journalism. Work in the engineering field will be great- ly facilitated upon completion of the Manual Arts Center since much equipment for these courses will be located there. College Offers Courses In Here is the architect's pendled sketch of the Manual Arts Cehter to be built at St. Martin College, Lacey. The center is being constructed to give coHegia/s opportunity to acquire skills in manual craftsmanship in their spare time ile receiving their col- lege education and to afford g .l.ate r scope to the credit-and class worR for the eagi-. neering degrees offered by the college. New Agriculture Courses in agriculture, pointing to best use of soils axe being offered and will be housed in the new center. - George Risse, maintenance fore- man at the college, is rushing completion of the huge refrigera- tfon plant on the west side of the main building so that he can shift his crew to the work on the Manual Arts structures. The School of Business buildings are being constructed under war surp- lus supervision. buildings  be located off the main col- lege ldll, on the southwest corner Of the large suburban Caaipus. Under construction now are the, classroom ... . . buildings and auditgHtma for the School of Business. These are at top center drawing. The long building (left top) is the first unit of the center prolier. It will be used for warehouse and classroom purlose s. Be- tween the long building and the chssro0m buildings is the present college men's dormi- tory, Benet HaIL At left, with the smoke- stack, is the new laundry building. Other buildings will house classrooms, exhibition halls and special engineering laboratories. q3hina Bishop'.s Escape FrOm Reds Is Saga Packed With Drama ECHNY,. IH., (NC)--P a c k e d with drama the story of the DAFFODIL DINNER IN escape of Bisliop Frmzcis Hoor- ' waarts, S. V. D, of Tsaochowfu PUYAILUP PARISH - from a cunist prison in Chi- . na thrpugh the aid of a group, de- HALL ON SUNDAY scribed as ',endiy communists," " is recounted in the Christian Faro- ..... iy and Our .Iission published ...... here by the Fathers of the Divine PUYALLD-P Women of All t Word. Saints Parish, will sponsor the t annual "Daffodil Dinner," Sunday, t March 30, in the parish hall, and I Ave. S. XV. Serving hours are from I 12 noon to 5 p. m. and roast] turkey will be the main item of the attractive bill of fare. Mrs. Lawrence Kremer is gen- eral chairman. Mrs. John Svoboda has charge of tables, Mrs. Jos. Toynbee of decorations. Mrs.. Gor- don Gross. tickets and publicity, {rs. Frank Kroeper and Mrs. George Latimer of menu. "The daffodil fields are in full .bloom and a glorious sight," says Mrs. Gross "Many people will drive to the valley to see the thousands of acres of blossoms. We invite all to stop by AII Saints hall and enjoy a delicious dinner." Give Your OIL BURNER ABetter Break I AVOID--rbon deposits a n d many unnecessary service calls. USE our scientific MOBILHEAT burner oils. Ntove Oil, Diesel Oil Fuel Oil PACIFIC COAST COAL CO. Oil Division MA. 5080 Also Coal for all purposes. Convenient Credit HARDY'S Incorporated H. F. AROLD,-President F. R. AROLD, Treasurer Jewelers & Silversmitlm Diamond Merchants FILne Watches Glass Ware Pine Street at Fifth Avenue Seattle, 1, HAMMAR OPTOMETRISTS Dr. T. W. Hammar Dr. T. F. Ginnaty ;ome of the details of the 68- year-old Bishop's escape are sup- lied by the prelate, himself, while additional facts were supplied by Bishop Vitua Chang, S V. D., of Sinyangchow. Bishop Hoorwaarts wa arrested by the Reds in the late summer of 1946, and taken from his diocese. He escaped and returned h, diocese early in October. th an amplifier system to enable the 'vast crowds to follow the pro- ceedings. As an example of the false accusations made against him, .the Bishop says, he was charged with buying Church prop- erty and not paying the full price, although the property was purch- ased long before the district came under his jurisdiction. At the same time one of the ,Sisters was accused of treating a patient with the wrong medicine, although at the time of "the patient's illness the Sister had not yet come to China. The Bishop asserts that he suf- ESSAY raZE 60ES TO PROVmENCE ACAOEMY STUDENT fered a torture greater than any in his captivity when he first saw the destruction 'which had been wrought upon his return to his diocese. The Episcopal residence, The comm > " ............. Cathedral and hospital in TSao- ULTnSL lLxtj, LLIJI uv1- the Tsaochowfu ar soon aft- [chowfuo had been stripped bare by the Ja anese surr n- r .. --ithe reds, the prelate says, and all 00oor00:L00 00tes, e %L00n2'S,=00l the mission stations of his 'h" . .___ ........ ]cese had been overrun and looted lie_ the smo,L wz eLL, b " 3" the communists Sx of the sta- first treated m a friendly manner ........ : ..... , lUOS together wlcn cnezr cna o,s, soon their houses schools and oth- P er property were confiscated. ] were burned to the ground. . inspiring talk on religious life. Dragged before a people's court, VANCOUVER. Wash: Norma Collette, senior, .in Providence Ac- ademy, was awarded first priz in the Clark County division of the es- say contest sponsored by Business was awarded first prize, in the Clark County division of the essay contest sponsored by the Business Women's Clubs of America. The subject ,assigned was "Peace Is Our Business." Miss Collette re- ceived a $25 bon& Vocation Week Ftures Speakers During vocation week creers professions, and vocations were presented to the student body by outstanding representatives of var- ious walks of life. Miss Iogen, t instructor of the SL Joseph Nurs- ing School, discussed the nursing profession; Miss Leona Comini. department store buyer, spoke on several aspects of women's work in the business world; Sister Mir- iam Theresa of Marylhurst Col- lge opened vast_horizons to stud- ents interested in social service work; The .Rev. Francis Schae- fers, principal of entral Catholic High School, in Portland, gave an 320 Stewart St. Telephone ELiot 1758 Seattle the Bishop and'a number of his priests and Sisters were accused of having been pro-Japanese and then jailed, he adds. Made Break For Freedom Though kept under strict guard,, two of the Fathers succeeded in making a break for freedom, Bish- op Chang says, taking up the. story, hut they soon were recap- tured and returned to prison. Late in September the prisoners began a novena in honor of St. Theresa, patroness of missionaries, Bishop Chang relates. They prayed for safe deliverance  for themselves and especially for their aged Bish- 'op. On the last day of the novena the group of "friendly commun- ists" made their way into the pri- son and rescued the Bishop. Evading guards they hurried from the lffidn but the Bishop's escape was dtcovered fiuickly. A thorough, search was begun by the troops in charge of the prison. They tipped over every strawstack for miles:. :!.- Crossed Fields on 'All Fours" Only one pile of sorghum stalks in the whole district was left standing. It was located in alarm- yard used as temporary quarkcrs by communist troops, . Bishop Chang relates. 'And it .was u0der this stack that :Bishop Hoorwaarts ested until he could escape during the. darkness. Bishop Hoorwarts said the red soldiers searched for him for nine days and nit.s. He hid during the day, while every village was combed fpr a trace of him, and traveled, oletimes on foo and sometimes "on all fours," at night, cutting acrossflields and avoiding public road,..::Jiventually he made his way back::his See city, which had fallen under nationalist con- trol. . Cruel 'Tf.al' Procedure Bishop Hoorwaarts described the cruel procedure carried on by the communist "people's courts." His trial was held in the open, he re- lates, usually at night, on a stage brightly illuminated and fitted Gleeson and Rock Jewelry Store To Close Good Friday President Orders Ban on Disloyal Employees by U. S. Gteeson & Rock announced, yes- terday, that their jewelry store, at 1510 Westlake Ave., Seattle, will be closed between the hours cg 12 a,nd 3 p. m. on Good Friday. Jerry GleeSon and Clarence Rock proprietors of the firm, both are members of Seattle Council, Knights of Columbus. CATHOLIC CHILDREN'S BOOK CLUB ANNOUNCES APRIL SELECTIONS NEW YORK :-=- The Catholic Children's Book Ciub has an- nounced its April selections as follows: Picture Book Group: "'Benjamin E;usybody," by Irraine Beim; In- termediate Group: "The P.n For- est," by Armstrong Sperry; Older Boys Group: "Galapagos Bound!". bv Felix Reisenberg, Jr.; Older I Cirls Group: "Willow Hill," by ] Phyllis Whitney. 19 Polish Prelate, Prisoner In Two "World Wars, Retires LODZ, Poland-- (NC-Fides)--Ill health, brought about by four years spent in Biecz prison after his arrest by the Gestapo in 1941, has forced the resignation of Arch- bishop" W]odzimierz Jasinski, who read his farewell letter at a Ponti- fical Mass in the i_z Cathedral. As a parish priest at Konin in 1914, he was arrested and im -I prisoned by the Germans in the f#rst World War. Appointed to the See of Lodz in 1 1934, after serving four years as Bishop of Sandomierz. Archbishop Jasisnki gave impetus to the web fare organization, Caritas, and to the Conference of St. Vincent de Paul. He remained at his post until his arrest during the naz.i occupation in World War :II. The Archbishop was freed in May, 1945. Truman's Executive Order Coincides With Revelation of Secret Red Aims In Turkey and Greece iN.C.W.C. News Service) WASHINGTON, March 24. An investigation of the loyalty of civilian employees of the executive branch of the Federal Government has been ordered by President Harry S. Truman. A person will be refused employment, or will be separated from service if already enolled, if all the evidence l CATHOLIC VETERANS - ENDORSE TRUMAN'S , LOYALTY DEMAND i suring only real Americans fill government positions", was en- dorsed today by the Catholic War Veterans, in a wire to President Truman signed by Max H. Soren- sen, CWV national commander. Sorensen also lauded J. Edgar Hoover, FBI Director as the "mas- ter nemesis of anti-American schemers", stating Hoover. was properly selected to lead an inves- tigation of public employees Fr. Conway Lauds President's Foreign Policy Stand NEW YORK. March 25---NC) Fresident Truman's appeal to on-{ gress for aid to Greece and Tur-] key was hailed as a "courageous I challenge to an expanding com- munism" and called the 'g rarest peace-time pronouncement an Am- erican president has ever made" by" the Rev. EcLward A. Conway, S. J.. of St. Louis Ur/iversity, on the Church of the Air program broadcast by the Columbia Broad- casting System. I Father Conway, formerly with [the Social Action Department. na- [tional Catholic Welfare confer- fence, declared that the present in- ternational crisis is not just one of power politics or economic clashes but a spiritual crisis. He added: "The struggle which car resoheO, it must be waged princi- rally on the spiritual plane." U.S. Isolation Now Would Play Into Red Hands Says Fr. Cronin NEW YORK, March 2.--(NC) Analyzing the stand taken by former Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy that economic aid to stop Sc-viet imperialism wod so im- poverish the United States that this country would be an easy prey to communism, and that Soviet ex- pansion would be self-defeating be- cause it would disillusion the peo- ple. the Rev. John F. Cronin, S. S.. Assistant Director of the National Catholic Welfare Conference, de- clared such a policy would turn Europe over to the Reds by de- f=mlt. He made the statement in a letter to the New York TLmes. Father Croni expressed doubt l that dmllumnment wo " '"  " uld check ] the expansion of the Soviet. '"The Ukraine has long since] I been disillusioned, but the only] resolt is ever more severe and ravage purges and reprisals, he concluded. Leaders A Camas-Van couver K. of C. Meeting Photo by Bill Cardiner Leadersat the Comas-Vancouver Knights of Columbus meeting were (left to right in photo) : Bob Moisant, gran d knight of the Camas-Washougal council; John Herb, grand knight of Vancouvvr; George Hofner, K. C. state deputy; Very Rev. Joph P. Dougherty, K. of C. state chaplain and E. Denby Browne, district deputy. m the case shows "reasonable grounds exist for belief that the person is disloyal to the Govern- ment of the United States." Following quickly upon this announcement, the State 1)e- partmcnL under ressure from a Congres considering {he Presi- dent's call for aid to Greece and Turkey, removed the "secret" label from a document which re- vealed the following: That there is "a master plan" abroad which would -separate M,accdonia from Greece and "make untenable any Greek government not subsewient to Communist aims" and that part of this plan is tbe "armed band activities di- rected and assisted from outside the country," wbich arc causing so much trouble in Greece today. That "the Soviet member of the U. N. Commission, aided by his Polish satellite." has done "everything possible to place "Greece in an unfavorable light and place the blame for fron- tier clashes on the Greek gov- ernment. Reference to Poland as a "sateI- lite" of Russia in a document of this sort is considered of particu- lar importance here. That the "Moscow press and radio constantly vilify the 'fascist' regime in Turkey, and Turkish language broadcasts from Radio Moscow even go so far as to call upon the people of Turkey to rise in revolt ,and overthrow their gov- ernment." Coincident with these develop- ments, two admitted former Com- munists told the House of Repre- [ sentatives Comw.ittee on Un- American Activities a Soviet spy ring and a ring fMsifying pass- ports for the benefit of Commu- nists wishing to enter or leave the country are busy in this country The witnesses, Liston M. Oak, and Fred Beal. said Leo.n Jos- ephson of New York is a mem- ber of the Russian secret polk'e, and that he may be "more im- portant" than Gerhard Eisler in the Communist movement in this country. The House Un- American Committee cited Mr. Josephson for contempt, as an outgrowth of his refusal to tes- tify before a sub-committee. President Trunan's order on loyalty investigations directs that all available pertinent sources of information F.B.I. armed servi- ces, Civil Service Commission and other files are to be utilized. CATHOLIC FANEBS OFFERED QUIDANCE IN RURAL HAHEiBOOK lia "Title Serwice HAVE YOU OUTGROWN THE OLD HOME? This spring many families are building or buying homes. Perhaps, you are planning on changing to a new or better home. Consult 3,our realtorbut when you buy--insist on TITLE INSURANCE issued by-- WASHINGTON TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY cat, Szso,ooo Agent - _ : SEATTLE TITLE COMPANY 803 Second Avenue, Seattle 4 MAIn 1534 L. S. Booth, Chairman Charlton L. Hail, President "Demand the Best- It Costs No More" STOUT'S VARIETY 5 and lO-ent STORE 2221 N. 56th St. SHOP AT STOUT'S FOR EASTER CARDS Candles, Baskets, Party Needs and Gifts, Yes, we have Bias Tape, Rick-Rack Seam Binding. Per Package 10c Oil Cloth, 4 Patterns,-per yard .................... 59c and 75e nite Shelf Liners ............  .......................................... .22e Pink and Rose Shelf Liners .................................... 12c Shelf Paper, Beautiful Patterns ........................  ......... ,Be Fuse Plugs, Household Cleaners, Paints, Brushes and Sprayers Lady Jackson Electric Ironers, $10.45 including tax NOW TWO STORES FOR YOUR EASTER CONVENIENCE Easter LiliesAII Other Kinds of Potted Plants (}RDER EARLY FOR CORSAGES UPTOWN FLORIST 530 Queen Anne Ave. CA. 3342 SUNBRIGHT FLORIST 452 12thAvenue CA. 9980 DAFFODIL TURKEY DINNER SUNDAY, MARCH 30 12 Noon to 5 P. M. Adults $1.25 DENVEr-:.--r>;C, -The prob- lems f thc 20tl century American farmer :.ere sf. dmd thoroughly in the "Ariultur] Handbook for Rural Pastors and Laymen," said to be the first handbook of its lfami!y type farm, the evils of kind to be disseminated uder i commercialized agriculture, rural Catholic ,auspices in America. I rebabilitatin' ruralsoft erosiOn,youth farm Intended as a guide to a solidi c-peratives' prob- lems ,and the teachings of the agrarian structure in this coun- t Popes. ! try, the handbook, sponsored by the National Catholic Rural Life Conference a n d prepared by Thomas E. Howarc: Denvdr of- fiel,al in the Departmont of Agri- culture, has been praised by Secre- tary of Agriculture Clinton P." Anderson and Bishop Aloysius J. Muench of Fargo (N.D.), Episco- pal adviser to the NCRLC." Covers ,Many Sub.]ex.s CartTing the mb-title "Relig- ious. Economic, Social and Cul- tural Implication of Rural Life," the book doe not limit itself to basic farm problems It discusses the NCRLC, what it is and who corrjpose it; the responsibilities at the rural pastor, what the De- partment of Agriculture is doing for the American farmer, the Af'I'lfl'', .1. O'SULLIVAN, 12t;' .mvrican Building, Seattle I. t,Vsh|ttgtor IN "!'lie SUH,'nlOi COURT OP" "fifE' S;:t*, ,,f Wa:,hm.vnn fnr t),o C'rllnty of 14il;2. - fn P:obat- In he M;dt('! of .he E:dalr- el" (; W Rr)hrlff, rr-of, a,'rl.- NO. lOl.}9.--r'iohco h (Zred,to ,. NoIcr" is hcFr'.by P. IV'I! that h r* tin- ] dr:; apprlirtcd arid }-iaa bc:en i fl;i/} "; a. EXr'(:I,tF ff Ihe ,tate of r: \\;V l',]hrl2, rIo,:!:-ed ha . I " p-r- <-r,\< hav;n -LsIJr:q'4 ;aJD./ :;;]rl rio-  { C;l:od :r r hr'r'r'i)V I'C(|lijrc,'d to eyvr, hn .om 140 members of the Van- i throughout the nation and spcc]- of Vancouver; Pev. Joseph Vo;gel sarae, duly w.ri'fir:ci, on :said Carl B. couver a n d Camas-Washougal i finally on the work being done in i (,f Sacred Heart Parish in Battle: winae or hi:: attrrmv of record a' lhe a'Adres -rjloI,." stated, and file the same Councils assembled in the parish our own State. ;Ground and the chaplain of Coun-i v:ith the Clerk of said Court. together hall on Wednesday of last week to ell 2999 of Calnas, Rev. Edward with proof of such service within six ..rnontb after the date of first pub!tea- welcome tl.eir state chaplain, Rev., A chorus of girls from the Haves were also in attenclanee, tie. of this notice, or the same will be harr.d. Father Joseph r-.ougnerty, Chart- Academy sang several numbers. The council expressed gratitude! Frt nublioa!on 5arch 7, 1947. !caller of the Divine, and State l Among the c:crgy present were to the committee frc m the Y.L.I i. CARL B. WINGE. Eecu'.or of said Estate Address 1212 American Build- Deputy George Hofner. Rev. John Ean, chaplain of Van-l beaded by Pauline am. who Phrail in Seam< Wwh FaTher Dbuherty ,poko oll the ec.wver ccunell, Rov.-Cannot -Me- I paved -the splendid luncheon ARTHUR J O'SULLIVAN. Attorney [\\;iork ol [he I(zdghts of I_', lu dsu I G.vecvy ad Ilev. l,'r McNerncy, all wa.; :wzve,l ] r,,r i2. tnlr-. 1?1; Am,'rieqn P.Id;, , E.nl- [|*: 1',1 = Jl ALL SAINTS PARISH HALL 2nd Avenue S. W.Puyallup The handbook was printed at the St. Anthony Guild Pre of I the Franciscan Monastery, Pater- I son, N. J., and is being distributed [ there and at NCRI. headquarters [in Des Moines, Iowa. HiLL TOP CAff 410 -- 15th Ave. N. CApitol 9739 WE WISH TO ANNOUNCE WE WILL BE OPEN SUNDAYS FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCHES From9to2 P.M. i i , , , i i , ,,, WHEN IT'S FURNITURE... Rugs or Electrical Appliances you need it will pay you to shop first at that big Furniture Store in the University District. GRINNELL & McLEAN HOME FURNIsHERS 43!5 l:oiversify Way IE. 5400 ATTIC r BASEMENT ROOMS RE-MODELED, FREE ESTIMAT] Paymenis of $12.46 Per Month, ]Per lom of &verage ALBERT WESOLOWSKI ontractor Est