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Catholic Northwest Progress
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February 21, 1964     Catholic Northwest Progress
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February 21, 1964
 

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6--THE PROGRESS Friday, Feb. 21, 1964 1 Aura of Mystery Cloaks Crucifix Relic at Milton By PAT WINKLER Assistant City Editor, Tacoma News-Tribune M I L T O N (Special to The Progress) -- An aura of mystery cloaks a cen- turies-old plaster crucifix hanging in the W. J. Shar- ick home here. A family treasure, the cruci- fix was found in the ruins of a church, apparently near Je- mez, N.M., by Sharick's grand- father in 1870, but neither the origin of the crucifix nor its exact age is known. A small sheet of tattered pa- per attached to the cross states: "Found in the ruins of Jemez Church." Another piece of paper at- tached to the Christ figure reads: "This was carried by the 'Penitentes' . . . (illeg- ible) this cross during a per- iod of I00 years. Albuquerque, New Mexico." The Sharick family also pos- sesses an old paper, the Mon- roe's Iron-Clad,Age, an Indian- apolis newspaper, dated Feb. 12, 1887, that carries a story about the discovery of the cru- cifix. Grandfather Sharick was on an expedition into "Big Horn" Country with a group of men at: the time. The Age prefaces the narra- tive: "The following interest- ing narrative of one' of Albu- querque's prominent business men, I. J. Sharick, who dared to venture on the hazardous expedition at a time the Sioux were never more hostile." The article continues: "The believers in Jesus Christ will find at I. J. Sharick's the THE STORY behind this ancient crucifix found in the ruins of a New Mexico church puzzles W. J. Sharick of Tacoma and his family. Jeweler in Albuquerque, a veritable relic recovered from the Jernes (apparently Je- mez) ehureh ruins, Christ on the eross, known to date back to 1659. As the church in ruins is prehistoric, it is like- ly to be four centuries old. The reliet (the Age's spelling) is as veritable an image as can be seen." In 1889 Grandfather Sharick moved to Tacoma and later to Name, Alaska. He brought the crucifix. And today the cruel- fix remains in the hands of his grandson, W. J. Sharick. The grandson has had of- fers for the relic, but, he notes, "You just can't put a price on something like that." Mrs. Sharick said the family plans to keep the crucifix. Fas- cinated by antiques, she said she plans to write to New Mexi- co in an attempt to determine the origin and age. The crucifix may have been brought into the Southwest by the Spaniards and placed in a mission. Nuns Remember Enthusiasm Of Nation's 'Star Boarder' SAN ANTONIO (N.C.) A good student enthusi- astic about school activi- ties is the way the "na- tion's star boarder" is remembered at Incarnate Word High school. This is the description given by teachers of 19-year-old War- rie Lynn Smith who has gone to Washington to live at the White House with her close friend, Lynda Bird Jonhson, daughter of the President. "She was more than a good, loyal student. When she volun- teered for a school fictivity, she did it with enthusiasm. She was dedicated to her school," Feature Films On Television BeHingham KING-TV (NBC) Channel 5 KVOS-TV Channel 12 KIRO-TV (CBS) Channel 7 Tacoma Seattle KTNT-TV (CBS) Channel el KOMO-TV (ABC) Channel 4 KTVW-TV Channel ]3 MOTION PICTURE CLASSIFICATION BY NATIONAL LEGION OF DECENCY: A-I--Morally Unobjectionable for General Patrcage; A-II--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults and Adolescents; A-III--Morally Unobjectionable for Adults: B--Morally Objectionable in Part for All; C-Condemned; SC--Separate Classification; NR--No Rating Available. (Note: The ratings listed below were those given the original movies. Most films be/ore being shown on tele. vision are edited to con/orm to the television code and to the individual station's time schedule. For this reason, objectionable parts contained in the original plot may be aeteted in the television verston and thus the originat Legion rating may not be entirely correct.) SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2l 1:30 ).m.--KVOS-TV--Falcon Out West ................................ A-II 2:30 ).m.--KIRO-TV--Blue Dahlia ...................................... A-11 4:00 Lm.--KIRO-TVNot of This Earth ................................ A-l| I:30 =.m.--KTVW-TVWlse Glrl ........................................ A-I 9:00 ).m.lKING-TV--Story of Three Loves .......................... A-II 10:00 ).m.KTNT-TV--House of Frankenstein ............................. L, lt:00 ).m.KVOS-TV3:10 to Yuma ................................... A.II 11:00 Lm.KtRO-TVThe Sundowners ................................... A.'il 11;30 ).m.KING-TV--Gun Fury .......................................... A-II 11:15 Lm.KOMO-TVThe Bad Seed ..................................... A-If 12:30 Lm,KVOS-TV--Race Street . ..................................... A-ll SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23 11:00 a.m,KVOS-TV--Malta Story ........................................ A-I 12:00 3.m.KlRO-TV--D[sputed Passage .. ................................. A-I |:00 ).m.KING-TVS renkt hrough .... .................................. A.1 2:30 ).m.KOMO-TV--Poor Little Rich Girl .............................. A-I 4:30 Lm.KTNT-TV--Torzan's Savage Fury ............................. A-I 4:30 Lm.KTVW-TV--The Clay Pigeon ................................... A-I :00 ).m.KVOS-TV--Seo Hawk .......................................... A-I 7:00 ).m.KTVW-TV--Blead on the Moon ............................... A-II 7:00 Lm.KTNT-TV--D[amonct Horseshoe ................................ NR 11:1S .m.KOMO-TV--To0 of the World ................................ A-I MONOAY, FEBRUARY 24 t):30 a.m,KOMO-TV--Lure of the Swamp .............................. A-ll 2:00 p.m.KTNT-TV--Love Under Fire ................................... A-I 3:30 p.m.KING-TV--Crlme Wave ........................... , .......... NR $:$0 p.m.KVOS-TV--Mlsslon Over Korea ................................ A-I 7:30 p.m.KING-TV--Prlnce of Players ................................ A-II 10:30 p.m.KTNT-TV--To Mary, With Love ............................... A-II It:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--The Fugitive ........................................ A-I n:3o p.m.KOMO-TVThe Seekers ....................................... NR }:00 o.m.--KTVW-TVCareer ............................................. A-I TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 9:30 p.m.KOMO-TVShootout at Medicine Bend ...................... A-1 2:00 p.m,KTNT-TV--To Mar'/, With Love ............................... A-H 3:30 p.m.KING-TVCottle Town ........................................ A-I 5:30 p.m.KVOS-TV--Famliy Secret ...................................... B 10:30 p.m.KTNT-TVeadlonds Of Dakota ................................ A-I '11:00 p.m.KVOS-TV--Waoons Roll at Night ............................. A-II '11:30 p.m.KOMO-TVThe Purple Plain ................................. A-II !:00 o.m.--KTVW-TV---Consolatlon Marrla0e .............................. NR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 9:30 p.m.KOMO-TV-.-Copper Sky ........................................ A-II 2:00 p.m.KTNT-TV--Badlonds of Dakota ................................ A-f 3:30 p.m.KING-TV--Valennno (Part I) ................................... B S'30 p.m.--KVOS.TVThe Golden Idol .................................. NR 7:00 p.m.KIRO-TV--Up Perlscol)e ....................................... A-I 10:00 p.m.KTVW-TV--The Navy Comes Through ......................... A-I 10"30 p.m.KTNT-TVThe Great American Broadcast .................. A-II '11:00 p.m.--KVOS-TV--Small Town Girl ................................... A-I 11:30 p.m.KOMO-TVVlva Zapata ....................................... A-II .1:4S p.m.KTVW-TV--Morshal of Mesa City ............................. A-I 1:00 o.m.KTV W-TVConsp[racy ......................................... A-I THURSnAY, FEBRUARY 2/ 9:30 a.m.KOMO-TV--Khyber Patrol ..................................... A-I 2:00 p.m.--KTNT-TV--The Great Amerlcon Broadcast .................. A-If 3:30 p.m.--KiNO-TV--Valennno {Port II) .................................. B 5::10 p.m,--KVOS-TVSudan ............................................... NR 7:00 p.m.--KIRO-TV--Vengeance ValJey .................................. A-II Y:e p.m,--KTNT-TVMan From Colorado ............................... A-II 10:30 p.m.KTNT-TVHere Comes Mr. Jordan .......................... A-II 10:30 p.m.--KTVW-TV--Crlmlnal Lawyer .................................. Aql 11: p.m.--KVOS-TVWhen Tomorrow Comes .......................... A-II 11: p.m.KOMO-TV--The People Against O'Hara ...................... A-II 1:00 a.m.--KTVW-TVCrashlng Hollywood ................................ A-I FRIDAY, FEaRUARY 211 9:30 o.m.--KOMO.TV--Stagocoach to Fury .............................. A-II 2:00 p.m.KTNT-TV--GIrl From Avenue "A" ............................ A-I 3:$0 p.m.KING.TV--The Lawless ........................................ A-II S:30 p.mKVOS-TV--Last of the Comanches ............................. A-I 0:00 p.m.--KTVW.TV--Crock Up .......................................... A-II 10:40 p.m.--KTNT.TV--Llfeboat ............................................ A-I I I1:00 p.m.KVOS.TVSusplclon ........................................... A-II 11:00 p.m.KTVW-TVFalcon In San Francisco .......................... A-II 11:30 p.m.KOMO-TV--Any Number Can Play ........................... NR 1:00 a.m.KTVW-TV--Fovr Jacks and a Jill ............................ A-II 1:00 a.m.--KVOS-TVDeeI Freeze ........................................ N R / This Review Is Sponsored by Catholic Gifts & Church Goods, Inc. Religious goods for the home, church and school. A pleasant shopping atmosphere with a select variety of religious gifts. 607 Union St., Seattle I MUtual 2-3929 one of Warrie Lynn's former teachers recalls. Warrie Lynn, a Catholic, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. War/told Smith, Jr., of San Antonio. She roomed in a dor- mitory with the President's daughter at the University of Texas, Austin. She has remained close to Incarnate Word High School since her ,,raduation in 1962, corresponding with faculty members and making oceff- sional visits, one just before leaving for Washington. "She was very humble about moving into the White House," one of the Sisters said. "I remember hearing her say, 'I hope it doesn't go to my head,' and 'I don't know how I'll do it. Frankly, I'm a little scared.' " Most of Warrie Lynn's formal education has been in Catholic schools conducted by the Con- gregation of Sisters of Charity of Incarnate Word. Prior to en- rolling in Incarnate Word High School, she attended Incarnate Word Elementary School for five years. Warrie Lynn and Lynda Bird have transferred to George Washington Univer- sity, a private institution in the capital. Warrie Lynn is majoring in education. Lynda Bird is a liberal arts major. Both are sophomores. Washington will not be new to Warrie Lynn. She spent a month last summer with the Johnson family. In Washington, Elizabeth Carpenter, Mrs. Johnson's press secretary, was asked why the First Lady wanted Warrie Lynn to come along with Lynda Bird. Mrs. Carpenter said: "I think Lady Bird wanted Lynda not to be denied the friendships of college. But on the other hand, she wanted Lynda with her." Pope Praises CRS.NC, Urge Its Support NEW YORK. -- (NC) -- Pope Paul VI has praised the work of Catholic Relief Serv- ices -- National Catholic Wel- fare Conference as an "out- standing example of fraternal love" and urged all U. S. Catholics to support it. "We cherish the confident hope that the Catholics of the United States will continue their steadfast cooperation with this most worthy cause," Pope Paul said in a message to the Bishops of the United States. The Pope's message was sent in connection with the 1964 Bishops' Relief Fund Appeal, which will be conducted nation- wide from March 1 to 8. A minimum goal of $5 million has been set for the campaign, which is the chief financial sup- port of CRS-NCWC. MERZ SHEET METAL WORKS We do new and repair jobs for ell purposa, where .heat metal is re- cluired. MAIn 3-0242 208 Jackson Street SEATTLE 4 Our Readers Write Few Realistic Meal .Time Ideas Editor, The Progress: Your Lenten menus in the February 14 issue provided us with some amusement, if few realistic meal-time ideas. The dinner for February 21, for example: after one finished grating the cucumbers, chopping the peanuts, shredding the co- conut, etc, he would be too exhausted to shift through the shavings and eat them. Do your SU home econom- ics majors anticipate having small armies of helpers when they venture into the real- life world of crowded, short- on-time kitchens? These comments are, how- ever, a mere man's view al- though my wife concurs. If you can take another com- ment from a brand-new sub- scriber: I applaud The Progress' de- sire to counteract the simpli- fied, "Ladies' Home Journal"- type of advice as characterized On Preventing Editor, The Progress: . . In the United States suicide has become one of the leading causes of death. Sui- cide is the seventh cause of death in the .U.S. Among those under 30 years of age, suicide is the third cause of death. Suicide accounts for one per cent of all reported deaths. The suicide rates are not the same in all parts of our nation. Seattle has the highest suicide rate of any American city. Suicide accounts for three per cent of all deaths reporte d in Seattle. One death of every 30 is a suicide in Seattle. One out of 301 This does not seem possible, but it is true. What is worse is that each year the suicide rate shows a small, but clear rise over the year before. No aspect of this situation is more tragic than the fact that most suicides can easily be prevented. The reason for this is that no one ever takes his own life unless he has made many repeated threats to do SO. Somehow an idea las grown up that those who make suicide threats are only talking. No idea can be more false. No idea can be more dangerous. At the least any person making a threat of suicide would be so unhappy that any good person ought to want to help the one making the threat find peace of soul. No doubt there are many who make suicide threats and do not in fact carry out the threat. On the other hand, if one makes a threat of suicide there is a very high degree of proba- bility that he will carry out the threat sooner or later. Research has shown this over and over again. In certain well informed circles, it is an axiom that a suicide attempt can be looked for from any person that makes any threat to take his own life. Warnings to this e/- feet have been made publie by the U. S. Department of Public Health and other re- spected health organizations. Still the average person remains in complete ignorance of this important fact. The great majority of Americans cling to the notion that suicide threats are only talk. America's shocking suicide rate is the re- suit. There is no doubt that if the family and friends of those making suicide threats would only take these threats seriously, suicide would disap- pear for all practical purposes. by Dears Abby, Ann, Sister Ruth, etc. The possible harm in accepting these daily columns as realistic social and moral guidelines is admitted. But why should The Prog- ress somewhat insult the in- telligence of its readers by attempting to superficially glamorize your advice de- partment by giving it a mov- ie-star connotation? If Reverend Nevins' "editing" of Loretta Young's column bor- ders on the actual writing of the answers, as I suspect it does, then Catholic readers would much rather discuss problems with him, in a spirit- ual, rather than a Hollywood, context. The Progress is well-read in our house, even down to the last coconut shred. Anthony R. Monahan 111 8th Ave., No. 187 Seattle Further Suicides Is The Northwest Progress able 'to do nothing about this terrible situation? If I may be so bold, would it not be pos- sible to put a warning about the danger of ignoring a sui- cide threat in some prominent place in each edition of your paper? If I may presume to suggest it, the editorial page, the front page, or better both would be excellent places to put such warnings. My sugges- tion really does not call for a great deal of space. It would be possible to fully convey the idea in a few terse sentences Yet there is every reason to think such warnings repeated- ly givea would do a great deal of good. Each year more Amerieans die by their own hands than were killed as soldiers in the worst year of the Second World War by tbe armed forces of Japan, our power- ful Far Eastern foe in that greatest of confliets. As noted above, 7eattle has a suicide rate triple that of the nation as a whole. All but a handful of these suicides would have been prevented if only timely attention had been given to suicide threats. Somehow the American peo- ple just simply MUST be taught never never never to ignore any suicide threat. Is there any better place for them to learn this than from the Catholic press? Suicide is a mortal sin against the Holy Ghost. The potential suicide may very well be insane. Care of and protection for the sick is one of the highest of all Chris- tian acts. This is true be the person suffering from a phys- ical or mental illness. Of course, no man can judge the suicide. Only Christ can do this. The Per- feet Judge will give due eon- sideration to insanity and to anything else that reduees or wipes out the guilt of our sin- ful acts. Besides all else Christ is very merciful. Still it remains true that sui- cide takes a soul to God under conditions that hardly seem favorable for judgment. Be- sides all spiritual considera- "tions, suicide is a great cause of human misery. Words can not describe the mental torture of the family of the suicide from fear their loved one is in hell. Donald Ebner 1478 Etbur Ave. Lakewood, Ohio Criticism of CBS' (The following letter was ad- dressed to the Columbia Broad- casting System in care of its Se- attle affiliate, KIRO-TV, Chan- nel 7, and called by the writer to the attention of The Progress.) Gentlemen: This refers to your recent CBS Reports program dealing with the Catholic Church and federal aid to education. In my opinion the program was badly distorted and cre- ated some false impressions. First, it was apparently predicated on the idea that everybody favors federal aid to education. It quoted so- called educational figures as taking this for granted, but no one opposing federal aid was quoted. Such "educators" in the past have distinguished themselves mainly by their interest in the taxpayer's dollar. They care not where the money comes from as long as it arrives in ever-increasing quantities. Nor are they con- cerned about the loss of local school control which inevi- tably would hinge on annual congressional appropriations for local education. I know of no basisforabald assumption that the American public or the Congress is in favor of federal aid to edu- cation except in sTeeial im- pacted areas. The fact that Congress has not approved Program on Education federal aid cannot properly be attributed to Catholics. Even if the latter were un- animously opposed to federal aid, or unanimously demanding federal aid to parochial schools, which they are not, their vot- ing power cannot be sufficient to determine the issue. It might be more accurate to blame the Republicans and southern Democrats for the failure of your aid to educa- tion bill. Some Catholic leaders have insisted that if Congress is to adopt federal aid to education as a continuing policy, similar aid must flow to parochial schools as a matter of sheer economics, unless Congress wants the public schools to as- sume the burden now carried, by parochial schools. I suspect, however' that many Catholics, like myself, are opposed to federal inter- vention in school financing or control. I personally resented the comments of one of your in- terviewees who said that the Catholic Church alone is pre- venting federal aid to educa- tion, or words to that effect. -This simply is not true. Such a statement should not have been permitted on the air because it was simply an expression of religious bigotry. Ted F. Berry 12237 2nd Ave. N. W. Seattle Menus 'Lead Astray' Editor, The Progress: First of all, a paragraph to tell you how much we enjoy The Progress. Our first year as subscribers is just ending and we have no doubts that we are better in- formed Catholics thanks to you and The Progress. I especially enjoy the instruc- tions from Father Trese, (many are Clipped and saved) and felt a real closeness to the Second Vatican Council via our own Archbishop's reports, I must add, in spite of his hard to take remarks about females. I could go on listing favorite fea- tures, (mustn't leave out the great editorials) but that is not the main purpose of this letter. Will therefore stop praising and get to the point. You are, by the way'of "Lent- en Menus and Recipes," leading us astray! Really Father, have you had time to read them? My dear husband is embarking on his fii'st Lent as a Catholic and is having enough troubles learning the many rules new to him without you adding to his confusion. To quote the Paulist Press excellent pamphlet "All About Lent" by George Wilson: "To fast means to eat less than usual. How mueh less? ENOUGH TO FEEL IT. For the purposes of today's Cath- die, the American Bishops have described the fasting setup to include only one complete meal a day. At this meal you may eat anything you wish including meat. Be- sides the one good meal, you may also have two other small meals of the "grab-a- bite" type. The two together should not be as mueh as a good meal and no meat may be eaten at them." The Most Reverend Fulton Sheen tells us how fortunate we are only to feel hunger for the 40 days of Lent when to so many on this earth hunger is an unceasing pain. How can we even begin to feel the slightest hunger if we follow the Lenten menus sug- gested in The Progress??? Your breakfasts of French toast etc. on Monday, Pancakes plus on Tuesday and eggs and potatoes on Wednesday cannot be classed as the "grab-a-bite" meals. Ditto for the lunches. We have been taught that fasting is an act of penance and that penance is a mortifi- cation performed in a spirit of penitence for sin. How pos- sibly can these delicious, fill- ing, nourishing and attractive meals be suggested as proper Lenten fasting? You are leading us astray. I wonder if you will also add a feature shortly titled "Lenten Sufferings Made Enjoyable." Just poking fun, although I mean every word! Enclosed find my check for another year of The Progress. Thank you for a great paper. Mrs. D. C. Abbott Aldarra Farms Fall City Editor's Note: The Lenten menus and recipes published in The Progress refer to the kind of fnodnot quantity. We hope our readers realize that the two small meals of Lent, regardles/ of their content, ought not to exceed in quantity the main meal. On Smoking Editor, The Progress: I think your editorial on smoking was evasive and mis- leading. For instance, you listed only one disease as being caused by smoking whereas the medical report listed several. You com- pared the harmful effects of smoking with the harmful ef- fects of using motor vehicles and eating fats, disregarding the fact that cars and fats are necessities of life which we all need but smoking is merely one of life's frills which no one really needs. You made the whole medical report appear rather question- able with the statement, "If smoking hurts you," or words to that effect. But didn't the medical re- port prove quite conclusively that smoking is a health hazard to all smokers more or less, de- pending on their occupation, how much they smoke and how long they continue? It is true that Catholic' papers don't advertise tobacco but un- fortunately sam e clergymen have taken to smoking in pub- lic and, since young people look up to ministers and priests as models of proper conduct, any example they set will impress young people far more than any paid advertisement possibly could. A READER Tacoma. Order The order which prevails in society is by nature moral. Grounded as it is in truth, it must function according to the norms of justice, it should be inspired and per- fected by mutual love, and finally it should be brought to an ever more refined and human balance in freedom. Pope John XXIII Pacem in Terris '00;hould We Punish Son for Cheating?' By REV. WALTER IMBIORSI(I Family Life Director, Archdiocese of Chicago Guest Columnist for Rev. John L. Thomas, S.J. Our boy, a sophomore in high school, was just sus- pended /or cheating in a test. l maintain that n,e must punish him. His mother says that everyone cheats in tests. What do you say? IRST of all, I'd say that his mother is letting her son down. She seems to be forgetting the man she hopes he will become when she excuses the boy for such a lapse! Cheating is an area which today has lost the sharp distinc- tion between the black of wrong and the white of right. It is a gray area which has such subtle shadings in adult minds that the kids are left bewildered. How has this happened? It happened in many ways, not the least of 'which is the sort of cultural atinosphere in which we exist which makes it "OK" for Dad to fix a ticket or Morn to lie to a salesman, but sinful for Junior to lie to that same Dad or Mom. The same atmosphere where all politicians are judged dis- honest, but movie stars may change spouses as often as cars; where education is equated with honors and marks rather than the knowledge gained; and, where parents measure all too often their success or failure by the size of Junior's first pay check. Your boy was fortunate to be caught. Now he has a chance --a chance to mend the error of his ways, to be punished and then forgiven, and to start anew. Don't think for one minute that he was unaware of his wrongdoing. Do not think either that he doesn't know that he is better off relieved of the burden of the guilt he felt. Whether he needs punishment more than that received at school is debatable. It would depend on the attitude of the boy, on your success in communicating your disappointment in him, on the reasons why he cheated in the first place. Responsibility Must Be Taught F he feels that cheating is some sort of "cool" game to be played between teacher and pupil, he needs to be taught his own responsibility in a class room. If he suspects that either you or his mother are more concerned over the humiliation of his having been caught than over the fact that he cheated himself, both you and he need to do some soul searching. Lastly, if he cheated because he felt you would not be satis- fied with the best he could do, it is high time you clarified your feelings on that score! The sophomore desperately needs to be liked by you and by his friends (an almost impossible combination) because he doesn't like himself very much. He can no longer be the child he was, and he can't get a very clear picture of the man he wants to beeome. A mother usually recognizes these needs in- tuitively, although she cannot always verbalize them to her husband. This may be the situation at your house and may explain the stand she has taken. I do not think she is honest yvith herself when she says he may cheat because all youngsters do. Sttrely she would not ex- cuse excessive drinking on your part because "everyone does"! It is difficult, however, for a woman to detach the sin from the sinner. She cannot see, as easily as you, that your son can be punished without being rejected. Any punishment at this age must not destroy the fragile sense of his own worth for which your boy is struggling. She must be helped to see that this boy is now more man than child; that the steps he is taking now are decisive ones. She cannot want him to be a cheating man, so she must not permit him to be a cheating boy. Sense of Values Wrong HERE is no doubt that both high school and college groups are permeated with a philosophy of cheating-is-a-game, which drives them to spend more time devising clever tricks than d studying. It is much the greater prize to attain a dishonest 991 per cent than have the knowledge represented in an honest 100 per cent. In fact, isn t it rather weird to be really 100 per cent learned? And even as we decry this trend, we must recognize that these young people are products of the adult society which we have helped to build. We must learn not to take corruption around us for granted. We must denounce evident wrong-doing. We must be firm in our own religious principles both at home and at work. Why? Because children see right through adults and their ""pious" platitudes. The child depends on his parents to be honest and courageous; the, are his models. If only parents and teachers alike could recognize these lapses from perfection as similar to the first faltering steps of the toddler--erratic but growing stronger; unbalanced, but prom- ising more steadiness tomorrow; independent, but always with the hand reaching out for reassurance. They fell often then; they are not through falling. They still need all the encouragement, rewards, punishments, and love that they ever did. We do not always find it as easy to give as they grow older. What do I say? I must say, do everything you can to help him become an honest man by firmly guiding him to be an. honest boy. I THE SIGN OF GOOD FOOD ... I 70 Stores In Eastern & Western Washingon To Serve You Why not TREAT THE FAMILY TO ONE OF OUR DELIGHTFUL DINNERS Delicious Sea- foods served in our lovely dining rooms daily. And o course FOR BANQUETS a "Private" DINNER PARTIES o LUNCHEONS --always the finest menuto your order.-- t in lovely surroundings!" WE SERVE the widest choice of sea- foods--jus he wry you want Chem--AND SEA-FOOD SALADS --Deliciousl For Reservations Phone THE SORRENTO Terry at Madison, Seattle MA 2-6400 I I II II Illii