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Catholic Northwest Progress
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February 21, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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February 21, 1947
 

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age EigSt A T H O k I C The Rev. Emery J. Blonchard Diocesan Director 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle 4---Telephone .MAIn 8880 HEAVEN OR LIHBO t "VISITING the sick in their homes, especially African homes, can be very unsatisfactory and heartbreaking, yet this is what we have to do for want of means to build and equip a hospital," reads a recent letter from a Fran- cmcan convent in Kenya, British East Africa.."It is dis- couraging on revisiting a patient to discover that medicine which was -carefully measured and left the evening before to be consumed by the patient has been rubbed on his back! "We have been in this new place just two months and have put up a temporary dispensary in order to help the people as much as we can. Every day we realize more and more the great necessity of a hospital. "A few days ago a poor mother brought her infant for treatment. We saw that it was dying and so kept it all day. In the evening we baptized the baby--Marie Therese---and sent her home with her mother having done all we could. Next day Marie Therese died. How many such souls we are deprived of---or rather the good God is deprived of for want of a hospital!" / Zanzibar--Then and Now In the eighteen sixties, Zanzibar made the headlines as the center uf the notorious "slave trade." Despite the vigilance of the European governments, the Arabs continually risked the treacherous coral reefs and obtained their cargo of "black ivory." In 1861, the slave market of Zanzibar attracted unusual buyers. Five French Holy Ghost Fathers could be seen daily buying up the disabled slaves and these • only because the price of the able-bodied was beyond their means. "Such was the beginning of the Church in East Africa," according to the Rev. Peter Kelly, C. S. Sp., who has labored for 11 years in the Vicariate of Zanzibar. The intrepid Father Le Roy (afterwards Arch- bishop) disgu!sed as an Arab peddler, made his way to the mainland of Kenya and began the mission of Mombassa. Other Fathers came and pushed into the intei*ior. Rome appointed Bishop de Courmont, first Vicar Apostolic of Zanzibar, a territory stretching from Guarda- fui in the Red Sea to Mozambique in the South. There was no western boundary. Today this vast territory is divided into 15 vicariates under "the care of various missionary Societies, but the Mother Church--the Vicariate of Zanzibar--is still under the jurisdiction of the Holy Ghost Fathers. The Need of the Hour Missionary Bishops have always been convinced of the necessity of native priests and the war has emphasized this need. It is the constant preoccupation of Bishop McCarthy of Zanzibar that worthy African boys be trained and educated to form a native clergy. When African priests work everywhere among their own people, then and only C I SOLONS WILL READ • MEASURES--SCHOOL BILL WAS HF.ADACHE the senate on Monday last unani- mously killed by indefinite post- ponement a bill which would have required parents to obtain ex- cuses from the superintendent of schools in order to send their children to private or parochial schools. Senator Thomas H. Bienz, Spo- kane, and Senator Lesie V. Mor- gan, Yakima, introduced the bill. Then the sparks began to fly. Telegrams and letters swamped Senator Bienz. Alarmed, he re- turned to Spokane to placate, if possiblef the angry parents who ,accused him of sponsoring an anti- Catholic measure. Never Read It "I didn't even read the bill," he confessed. "The last thing I would do would be to sponsor any meas- ure which would interfere with the right to send children to parocllial schools." Senator Bienz said he signed'the bill beoause Senator Morgan asked him to put his name on it. Senator Morgan said he, too, failed to read the bill, and that he signed it and asked Sen,ator Bienz to join him, because he was asked to in- troduce it by Joe Chandler, legis- lative representative or lobbyist for the Washington Education association. Red-faced, Senator Morgan moved Monday to postpone indefi- nitely the offensive bill. It died without a tear being shed for it. ST, MARTIN ABBEY SEEKS CRAFTSMEN: AS LAY BROTHERS LACEY. -- Further opportunity for tradesmen and craftsmen to follow their chosen work as mem- bers of a religious community is being offered to men by St. Mar- tin Abbey. In keeping with its goal to provide "mechanical and agricultural training on the col- lege level to its students, St. Mar- tin Abbey is at the present seek- ing young men with trade and craft training or who seek such educa- tion in conj,.mction with entering the Benedictine religious order. These men will assist in this pro- gram and serve as permanent members of the maintenance and then can we be assured of sustained effort and progress. Two wars construction corps. " causdd One ask and r htl I The Rev. Ansgar Hallen has ha:'e already irreparable damage, may ig Y'b ' Pen placed in charge of the lay- so, why this plan has not been carried out years ago. It is unfortun-I :" ....... .... Drainers ann ne will airect their ate, indeed. But there cannot be nahve pmests wthout proper forms-c ...... ........ ! .ommumry me aria prayer. tiDE and their formation requires noney. 1c is e nightmare oz an j Bishops in Africa. The building and maintenance of seminaries is a/D, 1_ 11 • the r work fvromer umeson Is drain on resources, yet the white mLssionaries can consider i ] i well done only when hey succeed in building up generous and noble |  * " | f • • I r n a n ned races rrovmclal 0I lriSll leade s area gthe ba do Notes on the Koreans A chaplain writes of his impr.essfons of the Koreans: "Out of the 29 million Koreans, about 250,000 are Catholics, and grand ones too. After a full course of instruction, they are kept on probation for 6 months, and if they prove themselves, are then admitted to Holy Baptism . . . Here in Inchon is an orphanage with 2 Irish, 2 French, and 16 Korean nuns. They have 100 orphans, and care "for 300 out patients daily in their dispensary. You would love Sister Philomena, one of the Irish Nuns; she indeed knows the bitterness of Japanese persecution humiliation, hunger and cold. During the occupation from Pearl Har- bor until a year go, the quns lived on grass. ?90% of the people are desperately poor; on all sides the direst poverty. The laps took everything but the soil and the weather. They must have taken the water, for although surrounded by the Yellow Sea, the Sea of Japan and the Korean Straights, there is little water for purposes of cleanliness. Water shortage perhaps accounts for the fact that practically all the natives have skin diseases." Holy Childhood News The Fourth Grade of Providence Academy, Vancouver writes: "We are enclosing a check for forty dollars for" the pagan babies we have ransomed. At Christmas time we sent you sixty dollars so we now have twenty ranms. Our Holy Childhood Club membeI:s are-glad to help other children to Heaven. The word of Christ must be spread to those who are not Catholics. We are glad to help the priests and sisters in this work." WAYNE RITTER, Secretary, Grade Four. African Floods and Droughts The striking contrast of two extremes is presented by two reports from White Fathers in different sections of Africa. Father Armand Lebel writes: "The rainy season is causing more trouble than usual this year. One of the arches of our mud school has crumbled. The native huts are melting, I might ay, like igloos unde a hot sun! Two bridges have been swept away. There is no telling when trucks will be able to get through again." Father Constant Durette reports: "This year"s drought is naking life hard for the natives. In some villages all I could get was a cup of water for washing and cooking. "With the rainy eason still two l months away, what are you going to do ?' I asked one of our converts. 'Nothing we can do about it,' was the stoical reply. At the mission we padlocked the well and get our water from a brook that has not yet dried up. The natives think this ridiculous: go to the brook for water when there is still water left in the well!" Christian Brothers DUBLIN, Ireland, Feb. 17.-- (NC)--Brother Patrick A. Glee- son has been appointed provincial of the American Province of the Christian Brothers of ,Ireland, which includes the United States, Canada, and Newfoundland. For the past ten years Brother Glee- son has been provincial consultor and director of studies at the American headquarters of the community, Santa Maria on Hud- son, West Park, N. Y. He succeeds the Rev. Brother Patrick J. Ryan, founder of the American Province of the Chris- tian Brothers of Ireland, who died recently at West Park, N. Y. Radio Programs Saturday, ,'ebruary 22, KOL, 7:30 to 8 p. m.--Ave Maria Hour. Sunday, Feb. 23, KIRO, 7 to 7:30 a. m,- Church of the Air. The Rev. Edward J. Taney will dis- cuss "The Tenth Command- ment." Since 1911... a name that has Sunday, Feb. 23, KOMO, 3 to 3:30 p.m. -- Catholic Hour. The Rt. key. Msgr. Fulton J. Sheen will deliver the address entitled "How to Meet Communism." Sunday, Fel 23, KXA, 3:30 to 3:45 p. m. -- Hour of St. Fran- cis. Sunday, Feb. 23, KOI 3:45 to 4 p. tin--Stories from The Digest. HARLAN S. CALLAHAN Sheriff King County Seattle, Wash. Notice of Sheriff's Sale of Real Estate STATE OF  WASHINGTON, County of King. ss. Sheriff's Office. By virtue of a Writ of Special Exe- cution issued out of the Honorable Su- perior Court of King County, on the merited the confidence of, the of Government Lot 61 32. Township 23 North,[ Range 6 E.W.M., described as follows:[ Catholic people of Seattle. Beginning at the quarter corner common to Section 32 and 33, said township and range, a n d running thence West 243.2 feet; thence North 212 feet to the Southerly bank of Cedar JOSEPH ,,". River: thence South 74:5' East 253.12 feet; thence South 142.6 feet to the point of beginning; levied on as the Manning & Sons property ofallofthesaiddefendants herein and each of them, to satisfy a judgment of a foreclosure of a mort- gage amounting to four hundred ten and 69/100 ($410.69) Dollars, interest -u,, u,l="'^r-I Directors and the cost of suit in favor of plain- tiff. Dated thL 24th day of January. 1947. HARLAN S. CALLAHAN, 1634 IJth Ave. EAst 7484 Sheriff. By L. E. ANDERSON, Deputy. First publication Feb• 7, 1947. Final publication. Mar 7. 1947. i Medical Mission iiii!i!iii Sister M. Barbara, M. D., of Wil- mington, Del., one of three Medi- cal Mission Sisters en route to Ranchi, India, where they will open a village hospital at Mandar. The new mission will be among the aboriginal tribes. Departure ceremonies for the Sisters were held at chapel of their mother- house, Fox Chase, Pa (NO Pb toe) ISTATE OFFICERS TO VISIT CHEHALIS, CENTRALIA K, C, CHEHALIS, Wn.--The Chehalis Knights of Columbus will john with the Centralia Knights at the local hall in welcoming the Very Rev. Joseph P. Dougherty, Chancellor of the Diocese and K. C. State Chap- lain, and George Hoffner, state deputy, on their official visit to the Twin City Councils on Febru- ary 26. Grand Knight Leo WaN dock is expecting a large turnout for the occasion. A iarge class of candidates is being readied for initiation in M, arch, and the date hinges on [ the procuring of a suitable hall for the ceremonies and the engag- ing of a place for the banquet. Chehalis is very short of both fa- cilities at the present time. Fathers and Sons Breakfast Another of the popular quar- terly Communion breakfasts spon- sored by the Chehalis Knights will be held on Sunday, Feb. 23, at St. Joseph church hall. Fathers and sons will breakf.ast together, after receiving Holy Communion. All Catholic men are invited to join them on this first Sunday of the Lenten Season. Judge John E. Murray of the Lewi County Superior Court will be the featured speaker. Kaufer Company Announces Two New Broadcasts The Kaufer Company, Catholic supply house, announces arrange- ments have been made with the Ave Maria Hour for two special programs, one for Palm Sunday and one for Easter Sunday, to be broadcast over Radio Station KOL. These will be on the air March 30 and April 6 at 4 p. m. There will also shortly be scheduled a rebroadcast of St. Madeline Sophie Barat dramati- zation, as requested by many. This saint was the foundress of the Re- ligious of The Sacred Heart whose local institution is Forest Ridge Convent. The Kaufer Company has brought a number of Catholic pro- grams to the Northwest. At pres- ent The Ava Maria .Hour may be heard on KOL at 7:30 p. m. each Saturday• The new program :"Stories from the Catholic Digest" is heard Sunday afternoons on KOL at 3:45 p. m. 95-YEAR-OLD ,JESUIT DIES CLEVELAND. -- Brother Jo- seph Nussbaumer, at 95 reputed to be the oldest Jesuit in the United i States, has died at St. Stanislaus Novitiate here. Born in Germany, Brother Nussbaumer came to the United States in 1888. , He entered the Society of Jesus in Germany in 1885. NORTHWEST PROGRESS ii 00Bishop Lane, MaryknOII Superior General, Visits Here En Route to Hawaii. (Continued from Page 1 h:m;:s: way of substitutions B:.shop Lane is as serene and un- Bishop Lane said the 9  o'clock Mass on Sunday, February 1'3, in Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church and spoke in Japanese to the parishioners. He also gave the sermon at the 10:30 Mass. In the afternoon a reception was held for His Excellency in the Parish Hall and this was attended by some 150 Japanese, Filipinos and Chi- nese.. Bishop Lane was a dinner guest Monday evening, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Kuo Pin TenD. Chi- nese Consul in Seattle. Both Mr. and Mrs. Tsao are converts to the faith. Third Visit To Seattle This was the Maryknoll Bishop's third visit to Seattle. :He em- barked in this city for Hong- Kong, in 1923, for his first trip to the Orient. He went to Man- churia two years later to open the mission there, leturning to .Maryknoll in 1929 for the chapter, and was elected to the-Council o the society, and made Rector of the Marylmoll Seminary. He passed through this city again in Friday, Febru(nW 21, 1947 RELIGIOUS ART PIdUl0000-* FOR CATHOLIC HOMES Ionsplnagnxf°;cV'" ." "ftt'!i ala" - ledj" prints are appreciated gifts for weddings and other oc- casions. BY MORGARI-- The delicately tinted pic- tures were formerly imported from Europe, now being pro- duced in U.S.A. acred Heart of Jesus Immaculate Heart of Mary Size 9x12 in., each, $4.00 BY CHAMBERSMany sizes. Priced $].50 to $20.00 The Last Supper, (his newest painting) Sacred Heart of Jesus Immaculate Heart of Mary BY DA VINCI-- The Last Supper, $2.25 to $40.00. Hundreds of other Old Masters as well as pictures by contemporary artists are always in stock. FOR LENTEN READING "The Lenten Missal," 54c up. Visit our Lending Library and beautiful book dept. 1932 enroute to Manchuria, hav- ing been made Prefect Apostolic of the Fushun Mission there. He was to serve continuously until 1946, save for a period in 1940-'41, when he returned to this country to be consecrated Bishop in his home city of Lawrence, Massa- chusetts. Bishop Lane left Seattle, Wed- uesday, for San Francisco, where he in to take ship on February The Kaufer Company hurried as a cloistered monk. Of the hardships he endured while a prisoner of the Japanese, he spzaks lightly, as one would of an !outing. Indignities offered by his 'captors were few. "lhe hardships, he says, were mainly lack of suf- ficient food. And the Ch:.nese Catholics valiantly lightened these I by a system of running contra- I band food to' the prisoners. Russians Were Pro-American At First Under the Russian occupation n Fushun there was much uncer- tainty and, at first, some indis- criminate shooting, the Bishop said. "At first, the Russians were very pro-American," His Excell- ency recalled. "The memory of substantial American contribu- tions of materiel to their forces was fresh in the soldiers' minds. The invaders rolled into Man- churia in American tanks, jeeps and Studebaker trucks. They greeted us with cheers for Amer- ica and its motors. With thumbs up, they cried, 'Studebaker Achin --Harashoi {Studebaker -- Very Good)'. The American motors had just brought them an impossible 2700 kilometers across the sands of the Gobi desert. They were vol- ubly grateful. Later, this pro- American attitude changed." U. S. State Dept. Got Bishop A Pass From Fushun, Bishop Lane went to Dairen, where until the arrival of the consuls in the spring of 1946 he was the only American in the Russian occupied city. After the American State Department exercised its good of- rices in his behalf, Bishop Lane was given a permit by the Russ- ians to depart from Dairen June 1946, and he returned to the United States to attend the gen- eral chapter of his society in Ma- ryknoll, N. Y. As Superior General of the Am- erican Foreign Mission Society, Bishop Lane directs over "Men of Maryknoll," 400' priests, 792 students preparing CATHOLIC SUPPLY HOUSE (Estab. 1904) "The Old Reliable Catholic Book Store" SEATTLE TACOMA • 1904 Fourth Ave. 74 Broadway (Near Stewart St.) MAin 2702 MAin 4:173 Stores also in Spokane, Wash.: Vancouver, B. C. 21 for Hawaii to visit Maryknoll! missioners in the islands. Mass At Marvknoll 'iA-Tfl-lfii/' Mo;e Catholics Church Sunday For NIGHT SET FOB H, N, n British Africa Bro. Amhrose, M.M. 00n00nruy aeUMNAE - Jnan in r.ngmno -- __ The 9 o'clock Mass next Sunday, in ROME.--Startling increases in! ........ I The annual "Back-To-School" m uur aay Mueen ot vtaryrs[ Nz ht for Hol  Nam. Academy he the number of Catholics in Brit- " - g 3 ;' • :' - - n- ish East and West Africa in the ]Church will be offered for Brother] Alumnae Assoc!ation will be held a- period from 1939 to 1946 attest to[Ambrose, M.M., who died in Hal- I Sunday eveuing, March 2, at 6:30 @ a prodigious missionary effort in ]land last week while visiting his o'clock at the A:ademy. n- the heart of the "Dark Continent". rail there All former students of Holy • la y • ,:, "'--- Aam- wh thor mere during the war years. There are] Na,,,.  /, '  - - - 12 now more Catholics in British At- [ Brother Ambrose, Christian J. hers of the Association or not, are Pets, rica than there are in England [VanKemten, was born in Holland invited to participate in the eve- for the and Wales it seems safe to say. d entered Mar knoll in ning of mus c" fun and games and ' m 1888 an Y ..... priesthood, 98 brothers. The Ma- According to figures released • . ..... to renew old fiend-hips hereby Fides mission news sPry- 1926. He served a ne os An- .... "_ ryknoll Si,ters numbering now • . ' • • . eies Mission und ne was rans- zce, the Cathohc populatmn xn   -  -  ..... , t. over 900, though under their own Tananvika iurnned from 429000 Iferred to the Maryknoll parmh or nLe ..........  v .......... administration, labSr in close co- . ;,J . C_^ ....... ' . fhere in 1941 where he served for the Lending Library a:d book de- operation with the Fathers and m ± co av,uuu m ±b; zn t - • - rtment of The Kaufer Co Uanda from 652000, to 861 two years. He has since neen eta- pa ., Brothers. To many these'figures 000. in' Kenya I from 145000 to lioned at the Maryknoll Seminary Cathoi!c Supply House. i904 ,tth I may seem large in view of the comparatively recent entrance of 248,000; in Nyassaiand, from 156,- in New York. Ave., Seattle. 00 to 251,000; in the Gold Coast, our country into the foreign mis- sion field. The total number of from 166,000 to 246,00; and in Sierra Leone, from 7,300 to7,900. D E E D E E - S American priests of all societies Statistics for tEe other British in .foreign mission work is very colonies in middle Africa; Ni- I small--something like one in thir- geria, Northern Rhodesia, and ty-s!x. The Diocese of Bruges in Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, are not Belgiumhas°neinthree'andlit- yetavailable'With°utthem'and B a ty Sh p tle Holland has more priests on without the total for the Union   O foreign missions than in the home of South Africa, British African O country. Within another decade Catholics number 2,214,000, as Amerma should be sending 1000 44 • " [against 2,4 ,000 for Eng],and and priests a year to the foreign mis- ]Wales" SPECIAL! SIDE, Bishop Lane believes. I A total of 232 African-born Maryknollers now are serving in priests now labor in the six col- China, Japan and Korea. They I antes reporting their figures, to- $12.50 PERMANENTS for $10.00 have missions, schools and hospi-[ gether with 109 African Brothers tale in Hawaii and in the Philip-land 1,057 African Sisters. OPERATORS pines, and there are 98 Mary- l knoll priests in South and Central[ The importance of iodine in the Jean McCracken and Frances Mclsaac America. Newest field for their diet for the control of certain apostolic service is in British-con- types of human goiter has been trolled Tanganyika Territory in one of the outstanding develop- 7413 Greenwood Ave. SUnset 6312 meEts in recent medical science. East Africa. Maryknoll undertook the African work in September tlge4;fTa:eaaI'Yi!?if:ifpri::dat"Africa is the most fruitful PUBLIC MARKET CENTER ECONOMY PIKE PLACE CORNER SANITARY WHERE THE BEST MEAT, GROCERIES, FISH AND VEGETABLES ARE SOLD MURRAY'S Pure Food Shop MEATS mission field in the world today," said Bishop Lane. Thi is due, His Excellency added, to the eagerness of the natives for instruction and to the cooperation of the British and Belgian officials with the work of the missioners. Recent reports the B.:shop has had from his priests in the African mission tell of fine opportunities, despite language difficulties. The lan- guage difficulties are multiplied by the fact that there are three tribes living in "the mission area. •his creates an administration dif- Delicatessen FULL UNE FRESH Hams & Bacon 1 5 11 PIKE PLACE MAin Z 9 7 5 CLASSIFIED ADS Rate: 20e ver line. Forms close Thursday a.m. COMPTOMETER SCHOOL HELP WANTED ENROLL NOW -- Day, Half-Day and CATHOLIC MAN OR WOMAN Even i n g Classes tn New Short A leading, old-line. Catholic B 24th day of January, 1947, by the clerk Streamlined Comptometer Course at publisher will have a representative: thereof in the case of Joseph Minor, the Comptometer School, Douglas in the Seattle-Tacoma arefi the Plaintiff, versus John L. Sopchak and Bldg.. MA. 8633 week of February 24th to train one l J'vlia A. Sopchak, his wife. Defend- person in Catholic book distribution ants. No. 378809, and to me, as Sheriff, RUGS & UPHOLSTERY CLEANED to lay-Catholics. Car and $200 in- directed a.nd. delivered: ....... fin your home: windows, woodwork vestment in stock required. Better rOtzce zs nereoy gzven, mat i wm I washed; floors cleaned and waxed, than average commission remunera- p oceed to sell at publm auction to the[ Exterior buildings steam cleaned highest bidder for cash, within the[ MOBILE STEAM CLEANERS ALl hours prescribed by law for Sheriff'sJ 5432 ' tf sales, to-wit at Ten o'Clock A M onl_ --" the 15th day of March, 1947, before the[ INCOME TAX CONSULTANT Court House door of King County, Jet- [ WILLIAM F. MILLER feron Street entrance, at Seattle, in J Your Tax Problems Solved number and name of your pastor, to the State of Washington, the following] (Seattle College Alumnus) Box S, care of The Progress. All described property, situated in Kingl 3rd & Marion correspondence confidential. State of Washington. to-wit: I tion. Splendid annual earnings. Ex- clusive territory. Life-time em meEt. Age immaterial. Sales ence helpful but not neeessar is a really good job. Write fully first letter, including your telephone EL. 2755 tf FOR SALE BY OWNER $4100. Nice home in Cathedral Parish. FOR SALE 7 blocks from Seattle College. Close- Four room house, immaculate condi- in, no racial discrimination. 2 bed- tiDE; large well-landscaped yard, rooms, living room, large bright kit- near St. Anthony Church• Call GR chert with.built-ins; hall, pantry and 1019. 2/.21/47 bah. Basemenl arae. which handyman could develop into 4-room apartment. Interior nicely redecorat- ed; outside neods oaint Terms can BUY OR SELL your home in West Seattle, 1 be arranged. 220 Eleventh Av. El, Seattle through Joe Casey, Agt., WE Until I0 P. M. 1784, 2/21/47 6126 or AV. 4500. _ ..yen ,,.ven.ns --5   FRUITS -- VEGETABLES -- GROCERi ES For three people. Please phone HE. 6694. tf NOTHING'S TOO GOOD FOR YOU PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT Why not for the children too? Chil- WANTED dren s custom-made coats as beauti- 83 P/] SgEET PHONE MkL 1826 BY exporting and importing firm, fully tailored as mother's and dad's fine hand-tailored suits.-No finer Ikll' l young male stenographer typist Re- ply giving full particulars, ace, edu- workmanship any place in Seattle. cation, exporience, salary. Write T. "CHILDREN'S COATS", CA. 6234. & N. c/o The Progress. 2-21-47 2/21/47. He@eft&Co. Sanitary Public Market First and Pike MAin 6996 Neupert's White Center Grocery 9465 Delridge Way AV. 0700 PATRONIZE PROGRESS ADVERTISERS age EigSt A T H O k I C The Rev. Emery J. Blonchard Diocesan Director 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle 4---Telephone .MAIn 8880 HEAVEN OR LIHBO t "VISITING the sick in their homes, especially African homes, can be very unsatisfactory and heartbreaking, yet this is what we have to do for want of means to build and equip a hospital," reads a recent letter from a Fran- cmcan convent in Kenya, British East Africa.."It is dis- couraging on revisiting a patient to discover that medicine which was -carefully measured and left the evening before to be consumed by the patient has been rubbed on his back! "We have been in this new place just two months and have put up a temporary dispensary in order to help the people as much as we can. Every day we realize more and more the great necessity of a hospital. "A few days ago a poor mother brought her infant for treatment. We saw that it was dying and so kept it all day. In the evening we baptized the baby--Marie Therese---and sent her home with her mother having done all we could. Next day Marie Therese died. How many such souls we are deprived of---or rather the good God is deprived of for want of a hospital!" / Zanzibar--Then and Now In the eighteen sixties, Zanzibar made the headlines as the center uf the notorious "slave trade." Despite the vigilance of the European governments, the Arabs continually risked the treacherous coral reefs and obtained their cargo of "black ivory." In 1861, the slave market of Zanzibar attracted unusual buyers. Five French Holy Ghost Fathers could be seen daily buying up the disabled slaves and these • only because the price of the able-bodied was beyond their means. "Such was the beginning of the Church in East Africa," according to the Rev. Peter Kelly, C. S. Sp., who has labored for 11 years in the Vicariate of Zanzibar. The intrepid Father Le Roy (afterwards Arch- bishop) disgu!sed as an Arab peddler, made his way to the mainland of Kenya and began the mission of Mombassa. Other Fathers came and pushed into the intei*ior. Rome appointed Bishop de Courmont, first Vicar Apostolic of Zanzibar, a territory stretching from Guarda- fui in the Red Sea to Mozambique in the South. There was no western boundary. Today this vast territory is divided into 15 vicariates under "the care of various missionary Societies, but the Mother Church--the Vicariate of Zanzibar--is still under the jurisdiction of the Holy Ghost Fathers. The Need of the Hour Missionary Bishops have always been convinced of the necessity of native priests and the war has emphasized this need. It is the constant preoccupation of Bishop McCarthy of Zanzibar that worthy African boys be trained and educated to form a native clergy. When African priests work everywhere among their own people, then and only C I SOLONS WILL READ • MEASURES--SCHOOL BILL WAS HF.ADACHE the senate on Monday last unani- mously killed by indefinite post- ponement a bill which would have required parents to obtain ex- cuses from the superintendent of schools in order to send their children to private or parochial schools. Senator Thomas H. Bienz, Spo- kane, and Senator Lesie V. Mor- gan, Yakima, introduced the bill. Then the sparks began to fly. Telegrams and letters swamped Senator Bienz. Alarmed, he re- turned to Spokane to placate, if possiblef the angry parents who ,accused him of sponsoring an anti- Catholic measure. Never Read It "I didn't even read the bill," he confessed. "The last thing I would do would be to sponsor any meas- ure which would interfere with the right to send children to parocllial schools." Senator Bienz said he signed'the bill beoause Senator Morgan asked him to put his name on it. Senator Morgan said he, too, failed to read the bill, and that he signed it and asked Sen,ator Bienz to join him, because he was asked to in- troduce it by Joe Chandler, legis- lative representative or lobbyist for the Washington Education association. Red-faced, Senator Morgan moved Monday to postpone indefi- nitely the offensive bill. It died without a tear being shed for it. ST, MARTIN ABBEY SEEKS CRAFTSMEN: AS LAY BROTHERS LACEY. -- Further opportunity for tradesmen and craftsmen to follow their chosen work as mem- bers of a religious community is being offered to men by St. Mar- tin Abbey. In keeping with its goal to provide "mechanical and agricultural training on the col- lege level to its students, St. Mar- tin Abbey is at the present seek- ing young men with trade and craft training or who seek such educa- tion in conj,.mction with entering the Benedictine religious order. These men will assist in this pro- gram and serve as permanent members of the maintenance and then can we be assured of sustained effort and progress. Two wars construction corps. " causdd One ask and r htl I The Rev. Ansgar Hallen has ha:'e already irreparable damage, may ig Y'b ' Pen placed in charge of the lay- so, why this plan has not been carried out years ago. It is unfortun-I :" ....... .... Drainers ann ne will airect their ate, indeed. But there cannot be nahve pmests wthout proper forms-c ...... ........ ! .ommumry me aria prayer. tiDE and their formation requires noney. 1c is e nightmare oz an j Bishops in Africa. The building and maintenance of seminaries is a/D, 1_ 11 • the r work fvromer umeson Is drain on resources, yet the white mLssionaries can consider i ] i well done only when hey succeed in building up generous and noble |  * " | f • • I r n a n ned races rrovmclal 0I lriSll leade s area gthe ba do Notes on the Koreans A chaplain writes of his impr.essfons of the Koreans: "Out of the 29 million Koreans, about 250,000 are Catholics, and grand ones too. After a full course of instruction, they are kept on probation for 6 months, and if they prove themselves, are then admitted to Holy Baptism . . . Here in Inchon is an orphanage with 2 Irish, 2 French, and 16 Korean nuns. They have 100 orphans, and care "for 300 out patients daily in their dispensary. You would love Sister Philomena, one of the Irish Nuns; she indeed knows the bitterness of Japanese persecution humiliation, hunger and cold. During the occupation from Pearl Har- bor until a year go, the quns lived on grass. ?90% of the people are desperately poor; on all sides the direst poverty. The laps took everything but the soil and the weather. They must have taken the water, for although surrounded by the Yellow Sea, the Sea of Japan and the Korean Straights, there is little water for purposes of cleanliness. Water shortage perhaps accounts for the fact that practically all the natives have skin diseases." Holy Childhood News The Fourth Grade of Providence Academy, Vancouver writes: "We are enclosing a check for forty dollars for" the pagan babies we have ransomed. At Christmas time we sent you sixty dollars so we now have twenty ranms. Our Holy Childhood Club membeI:s are-glad to help other children to Heaven. The word of Christ must be spread to those who are not Catholics. We are glad to help the priests and sisters in this work." WAYNE RITTER, Secretary, Grade Four. African Floods and Droughts The striking contrast of two extremes is presented by two reports from White Fathers in different sections of Africa. Father Armand Lebel writes: "The rainy season is causing more trouble than usual this year. One of the arches of our mud school has crumbled. The native huts are melting, I might ay, like igloos unde a hot sun! Two bridges have been swept away. There is no telling when trucks will be able to get through again." Father Constant Durette reports: "This year"s drought is naking life hard for the natives. In some villages all I could get was a cup of water for washing and cooking. "With the rainy eason still two l months away, what are you going to do ?' I asked one of our converts. 'Nothing we can do about it,' was the stoical reply. At the mission we padlocked the well and get our water from a brook that has not yet dried up. The natives think this ridiculous: go to the brook for water when there is still water left in the well!" Christian Brothers DUBLIN, Ireland, Feb. 17.-- (NC)--Brother Patrick A. Glee- son has been appointed provincial of the American Province of the Christian Brothers of ,Ireland, which includes the United States, Canada, and Newfoundland. For the past ten years Brother Glee- son has been provincial consultor and director of studies at the American headquarters of the community, Santa Maria on Hud- son, West Park, N. Y. He succeeds the Rev. Brother Patrick J. Ryan, founder of the American Province of the Chris- tian Brothers of Ireland, who died recently at West Park, N. Y. Radio Programs Saturday, ,'ebruary 22, KOL, 7:30 to 8 p. m.--Ave Maria Hour. Sunday, Feb. 23, KIRO, 7 to 7:30 a. m,- Church of the Air. The Rev. Edward J. Taney will dis- cuss "The Tenth Command- ment." Since 1911... a name that has Sunday, Feb. 23, KOMO, 3 to 3:30 p.m. -- Catholic Hour. The Rt. key. Msgr. Fulton J. Sheen will deliver the address entitled "How to Meet Communism." Sunday, Fel 23, KXA, 3:30 to 3:45 p. m. -- Hour of St. Fran- cis. Sunday, Feb. 23, KOI 3:45 to 4 p. tin--Stories from The Digest. HARLAN S. CALLAHAN Sheriff King County Seattle, Wash. Notice of Sheriff's Sale of Real Estate STATE OF  WASHINGTON, County of King. ss. Sheriff's Office. By virtue of a Writ of Special Exe- cution issued out of the Honorable Su- perior Court of King County, on the merited the confidence of, the of Government Lot 61 32. Township 23 North,[ Range 6 E.W.M., described as follows:[ Catholic people of Seattle. Beginning at the quarter corner common to Section 32 and 33, said township and range, a n d running thence West 243.2 feet; thence North 212 feet to the Southerly bank of Cedar JOSEPH ,,". River: thence South 74:5' East 253.12 feet; thence South 142.6 feet to the point of beginning; levied on as the Manning & Sons property ofallofthesaiddefendants herein and each of them, to satisfy a judgment of a foreclosure of a mort- gage amounting to four hundred ten and 69/100 ($410.69) Dollars, interest -u,, u,l="'^r-I Directors and the cost of suit in favor of plain- tiff. Dated thL 24th day of January. 1947. HARLAN S. CALLAHAN, 1634 IJth Ave. EAst 7484 Sheriff. By L. E. ANDERSON, Deputy. First publication Feb• 7, 1947. Final publication. Mar 7. 1947. i Medical Mission iiii!i!iii Sister M. Barbara, M. D., of Wil- mington, Del., one of three Medi- cal Mission Sisters en route to Ranchi, India, where they will open a village hospital at Mandar. The new mission will be among the aboriginal tribes. Departure ceremonies for the Sisters were held at chapel of their mother- house, Fox Chase, Pa (NO Pb toe) ISTATE OFFICERS TO VISIT CHEHALIS, CENTRALIA K, C, CHEHALIS, Wn.--The Chehalis Knights of Columbus will john with the Centralia Knights at the local hall in welcoming the Very Rev. Joseph P. Dougherty, Chancellor of the Diocese and K. C. State Chap- lain, and George Hoffner, state deputy, on their official visit to the Twin City Councils on Febru- ary 26. Grand Knight Leo WaN dock is expecting a large turnout for the occasion. A iarge class of candidates is being readied for initiation in M, arch, and the date hinges on [ the procuring of a suitable hall for the ceremonies and the engag- ing of a place for the banquet. Chehalis is very short of both fa- cilities at the present time. Fathers and Sons Breakfast Another of the popular quar- terly Communion breakfasts spon- sored by the Chehalis Knights will be held on Sunday, Feb. 23, at St. Joseph church hall. Fathers and sons will breakf.ast together, after receiving Holy Communion. All Catholic men are invited to join them on this first Sunday of the Lenten Season. Judge John E. Murray of the Lewi County Superior Court will be the featured speaker. Kaufer Company Announces Two New Broadcasts The Kaufer Company, Catholic supply house, announces arrange- ments have been made with the Ave Maria Hour for two special programs, one for Palm Sunday and one for Easter Sunday, to be broadcast over Radio Station KOL. These will be on the air March 30 and April 6 at 4 p. m. There will also shortly be scheduled a rebroadcast of St. Madeline Sophie Barat dramati- zation, as requested by many. This saint was the foundress of the Re- ligious of The Sacred Heart whose local institution is Forest Ridge Convent. The Kaufer Company has brought a number of Catholic pro- grams to the Northwest. At pres- ent The Ava Maria .Hour may be heard on KOL at 7:30 p. m. each Saturday• The new program :"Stories from the Catholic Digest" is heard Sunday afternoons on KOL at 3:45 p. m. 95-YEAR-OLD ,JESUIT DIES CLEVELAND. -- Brother Jo- seph Nussbaumer, at 95 reputed to be the oldest Jesuit in the United i States, has died at St. Stanislaus Novitiate here. Born in Germany, Brother Nussbaumer came to the United States in 1888. , He entered the Society of Jesus in Germany in 1885. NORTHWEST PROGRESS ii 00Bishop Lane, MaryknOII Superior General, Visits Here En Route to Hawaii. (Continued from Page 1 h:m;:s: way of substitutions B:.shop Lane is as serene and un- Bishop Lane said the 9  o'clock Mass on Sunday, February 1'3, in Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church and spoke in Japanese to the parishioners. He also gave the sermon at the 10:30 Mass. In the afternoon a reception was held for His Excellency in the Parish Hall and this was attended by some 150 Japanese, Filipinos and Chi- nese.. Bishop Lane was a dinner guest Monday evening, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Kuo Pin TenD. Chi- nese Consul in Seattle. Both Mr. and Mrs. Tsao are converts to the faith. Third Visit To Seattle This was the Maryknoll Bishop's third visit to Seattle. :He em- barked in this city for Hong- Kong, in 1923, for his first trip to the Orient. He went to Man- churia two years later to open the mission there, leturning to .Maryknoll in 1929 for the chapter, and was elected to the-Council o the society, and made Rector of the Marylmoll Seminary. He passed through this city again in Friday, Febru(nW 21, 1947 RELIGIOUS ART PIdUl0000-* FOR CATHOLIC HOMES Ionsplnagnxf°;cV'" ." "ftt'!i ala" - ledj" prints are appreciated gifts for weddings and other oc- casions. BY MORGARI-- The delicately tinted pic- tures were formerly imported from Europe, now being pro- duced in U.S.A. acred Heart of Jesus Immaculate Heart of Mary Size 9x12 in., each, $4.00 BY CHAMBERSMany sizes. Priced $].50 to $20.00 The Last Supper, (his newest painting) Sacred Heart of Jesus Immaculate Heart of Mary BY DA VINCI-- The Last Supper, $2.25 to $40.00. Hundreds of other Old Masters as well as pictures by contemporary artists are always in stock. FOR LENTEN READING "The Lenten Missal," 54c up. Visit our Lending Library and beautiful book dept. 1932 enroute to Manchuria, hav- ing been made Prefect Apostolic of the Fushun Mission there. He was to serve continuously until 1946, save for a period in 1940-'41, when he returned to this country to be consecrated Bishop in his home city of Lawrence, Massa- chusetts. Bishop Lane left Seattle, Wed- uesday, for San Francisco, where he in to take ship on February The Kaufer Company hurried as a cloistered monk. Of the hardships he endured while a prisoner of the Japanese, he spzaks lightly, as one would of an !outing. Indignities offered by his 'captors were few. "lhe hardships, he says, were mainly lack of suf- ficient food. And the Ch:.nese Catholics valiantly lightened these I by a system of running contra- I band food to' the prisoners. Russians Were Pro-American At First Under the Russian occupation n Fushun there was much uncer- tainty and, at first, some indis- criminate shooting, the Bishop said. "At first, the Russians were very pro-American," His Excell- ency recalled. "The memory of substantial American contribu- tions of materiel to their forces was fresh in the soldiers' minds. The invaders rolled into Man- churia in American tanks, jeeps and Studebaker trucks. They greeted us with cheers for Amer- ica and its motors. With thumbs up, they cried, 'Studebaker Achin --Harashoi {Studebaker -- Very Good)'. The American motors had just brought them an impossible 2700 kilometers across the sands of the Gobi desert. They were vol- ubly grateful. Later, this pro- American attitude changed." U. S. State Dept. Got Bishop A Pass From Fushun, Bishop Lane went to Dairen, where until the arrival of the consuls in the spring of 1946 he was the only American in the Russian occupied city. After the American State Department exercised its good of- rices in his behalf, Bishop Lane was given a permit by the Russ- ians to depart from Dairen June 1946, and he returned to the United States to attend the gen- eral chapter of his society in Ma- ryknoll, N. Y. As Superior General of the Am- erican Foreign Mission Society, Bishop Lane directs over "Men of Maryknoll," 400' priests, 792 students preparing CATHOLIC SUPPLY HOUSE (Estab. 1904) "The Old Reliable Catholic Book Store" SEATTLE TACOMA • 1904 Fourth Ave. 74 Broadway (Near Stewart St.) MAin 2702 MAin 4:173 Stores also in Spokane, Wash.: Vancouver, B. C. 21 for Hawaii to visit Maryknoll! missioners in the islands. Mass At Marvknoll 'iA-Tfl-lfii/' Mo;e Catholics Church Sunday For NIGHT SET FOB H, N, n British Africa Bro. Amhrose, M.M. 00n00nruy aeUMNAE - Jnan in r.ngmno -- __ The 9 o'clock Mass next Sunday, in ROME.--Startling increases in! ........ I The annual "Back-To-School" m uur aay Mueen ot vtaryrs[ Nz ht for Hol  Nam. Academy he the number of Catholics in Brit- " - g 3 ;' • :' - - n- ish East and West Africa in the ]Church will be offered for Brother] Alumnae Assoc!ation will be held a- period from 1939 to 1946 attest to[Ambrose, M.M., who died in Hal- I Sunday eveuing, March 2, at 6:30 @ a prodigious missionary effort in ]land last week while visiting his o'clock at the A:ademy. n- the heart of the "Dark Continent". rail there All former students of Holy • la y • ,:, "'--- Aam- wh thor mere during the war years. There are] Na,,,.  /, '  - - - 12 now more Catholics in British At- [ Brother Ambrose, Christian J. hers of the Association or not, are Pets, rica than there are in England [VanKemten, was born in Holland invited to participate in the eve- for the and Wales it seems safe to say. d entered Mar knoll in ning of mus c" fun and games and ' m 1888 an Y ..... priesthood, 98 brothers. The Ma- According to figures released • . ..... to renew old fiend-hips hereby Fides mission news sPry- 1926. He served a ne os An- .... "_ ryknoll Si,ters numbering now • . ' • • . eies Mission und ne was rans- zce, the Cathohc populatmn xn   -  -  ..... , t. over 900, though under their own Tananvika iurnned from 429000 Iferred to the Maryknoll parmh or nLe ..........  v .......... administration, labSr in close co- . ;,J . C_^ ....... ' . fhere in 1941 where he served for the Lending Library a:d book de- operation with the Fathers and m ± co av,uuu m ±b; zn t - • - rtment of The Kaufer Co Uanda from 652000, to 861 two years. He has since neen eta- pa ., Brothers. To many these'figures 000. in' Kenya I from 145000 to lioned at the Maryknoll Seminary Cathoi!c Supply House. i904 ,tth I may seem large in view of the comparatively recent entrance of 248,000; in Nyassaiand, from 156,- in New York. Ave., Seattle. 00 to 251,000; in the Gold Coast, our country into the foreign mis- sion field. The total number of from 166,000 to 246,00; and in Sierra Leone, from 7,300 to7,900. D E E D E E - S American priests of all societies Statistics for tEe other British in .foreign mission work is very colonies in middle Africa; Ni- I small--something like one in thir- geria, Northern Rhodesia, and ty-s!x. The Diocese of Bruges in Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, are not Belgiumhas°neinthree'andlit- yetavailable'With°utthem'and B a ty Sh p tle Holland has more priests on without the total for the Union   O foreign missions than in the home of South Africa, British African O country. Within another decade Catholics number 2,214,000, as Amerma should be sending 1000 44 • " [against 2,4 ,000 for Eng],and and priests a year to the foreign mis- ]Wales" SPECIAL! SIDE, Bishop Lane believes. I A total of 232 African-born Maryknollers now are serving in priests now labor in the six col- China, Japan and Korea. They I antes reporting their figures, to- $12.50 PERMANENTS for $10.00 have missions, schools and hospi-[ gether with 109 African Brothers tale in Hawaii and in the Philip-land 1,057 African Sisters. OPERATORS pines, and there are 98 Mary- l knoll priests in South and Central[ The importance of iodine in the Jean McCracken and Frances Mclsaac America. Newest field for their diet for the control of certain apostolic service is in British-con- types of human goiter has been trolled Tanganyika Territory in one of the outstanding develop- 7413 Greenwood Ave. SUnset 6312 meEts in recent medical science. East Africa. Maryknoll undertook the African work in September tlge4;fTa:eaaI'Yi!?if:ifpri::dat"Africa is the most fruitful PUBLIC MARKET CENTER ECONOMY PIKE PLACE CORNER SANITARY WHERE THE BEST MEAT, GROCERIES, FISH AND VEGETABLES ARE SOLD MURRAY'S Pure Food Shop MEATS mission field in the world today," said Bishop Lane. Thi is due, His Excellency added, to the eagerness of the natives for instruction and to the cooperation of the British and Belgian officials with the work of the missioners. Recent reports the B.:shop has had from his priests in the African mission tell of fine opportunities, despite language difficulties. The lan- guage difficulties are multiplied by the fact that there are three tribes living in "the mission area. •his creates an administration dif- Delicatessen FULL UNE FRESH Hams & Bacon 1 5 11 PIKE PLACE MAin Z 9 7 5 CLASSIFIED ADS Rate: 20e ver line. Forms close Thursday a.m. COMPTOMETER SCHOOL HELP WANTED ENROLL NOW -- Day, Half-Day and CATHOLIC MAN OR WOMAN Even i n g Classes tn New Short A leading, old-line. Catholic B 24th day of January, 1947, by the clerk Streamlined Comptometer Course at publisher will have a representative: thereof in the case of Joseph Minor, the Comptometer School, Douglas in the Seattle-Tacoma arefi the Plaintiff, versus John L. Sopchak and Bldg.. MA. 8633 week of February 24th to train one l J'vlia A. Sopchak, his wife. Defend- person in Catholic book distribution ants. No. 378809, and to me, as Sheriff, RUGS & UPHOLSTERY CLEANED to lay-Catholics. Car and $200 in- directed a.nd. delivered: ....... fin your home: windows, woodwork vestment in stock required. Better rOtzce zs nereoy gzven, mat i wm I washed; floors cleaned and waxed, than average commission remunera- p oceed to sell at publm auction to the[ Exterior buildings steam cleaned highest bidder for cash, within the[ MOBILE STEAM CLEANERS ALl hours prescribed by law for Sheriff'sJ 5432 ' tf sales, to-wit at Ten o'Clock A M onl_ --" the 15th day of March, 1947, before the[ INCOME TAX CONSULTANT Court House door of King County, Jet- [ WILLIAM F. MILLER feron Street entrance, at Seattle, in J Your Tax Problems Solved number and name of your pastor, to the State of Washington, the following] (Seattle College Alumnus) Box S, care of The Progress. All described property, situated in Kingl 3rd & Marion correspondence confidential. State of Washington. to-wit: I tion. Splendid annual earnings. Ex- clusive territory. Life-time em meEt. Age immaterial. Sales ence helpful but not neeessar is a really good job. Write fully first letter, including your telephone EL. 2755 tf FOR SALE BY OWNER $4100. Nice home in Cathedral Parish. FOR SALE 7 blocks from Seattle College. Close- Four room house, immaculate condi- in, no racial discrimination. 2 bed- tiDE; large well-landscaped yard, rooms, living room, large bright kit- near St. Anthony Church• Call GR chert with.built-ins; hall, pantry and 1019. 2/.21/47 bah. Basemenl arae. which handyman could develop into 4-room apartment. Interior nicely redecorat- ed; outside neods oaint Terms can BUY OR SELL your home in West Seattle, 1 be arranged. 220 Eleventh Av. El, Seattle through Joe Casey, Agt., WE Until I0 P. M. 1784, 2/21/47 6126 or AV. 4500. _ ..yen ,,.ven.ns --5   FRUITS -- VEGETABLES -- GROCERi ES For three people. Please phone HE. 6694. tf NOTHING'S TOO GOOD FOR YOU PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT Why not for the children too? Chil- WANTED dren s custom-made coats as beauti- 83 P/] SgEET PHONE MkL 1826 BY exporting and importing firm, fully tailored as mother's and dad's fine hand-tailored suits.-No finer Ikll' l young male stenographer typist Re- ply giving full particulars, ace, edu- workmanship any place in Seattle. cation, exporience, salary. Write T. "CHILDREN'S COATS", CA. 6234. & N. c/o The Progress. 2-21-47 2/21/47. He@eft&Co. Sanitary Public Market First and Pike MAin 6996 Neupert's White Center Grocery 9465 Delridge Way AV. 0700 PATRONIZE PROGRESS ADVERTISERS age EigSt A T H O k I C The Rev. Emery J. Blonchard Diocesan Director 907 Terry Avenue, Seattle 4---Telephone .MAIn 8880 HEAVEN OR LIHBO t "VISITING the sick in their homes, especially African homes, can be very unsatisfactory and heartbreaking, yet this is what we have to do for want of means to build and equip a hospital," reads a recent letter from a Fran- cmcan convent in Kenya, British East Africa.."It is dis- couraging on revisiting a patient to discover that medicine which was -carefully measured and left the evening before to be consumed by the patient has been rubbed on his back! "We have been in this new place just two months and have put up a temporary dispensary in order to help the people as much as we can. Every day we realize more and more the great necessity of a hospital. "A few days ago a poor mother brought her infant for treatment. We saw that it was dying and so kept it all day. In the evening we baptized the baby--Marie Therese---and sent her home with her mother having done all we could. Next day Marie Therese died. How many such souls we are deprived of---or rather the good God is deprived of for want of a hospital!" / Zanzibar--Then and Now In the eighteen sixties, Zanzibar made the headlines as the center uf the notorious "slave trade." Despite the vigilance of the European governments, the Arabs continually risked the treacherous coral reefs and obtained their cargo of "black ivory." In 1861, the slave market of Zanzibar attracted unusual buyers. Five French Holy Ghost Fathers could be seen daily buying up the disabled slaves and these • only because the price of the able-bodied was beyond their means. "Such was the beginning of the Church in East Africa," according to the Rev. Peter Kelly, C. S. Sp., who has labored for 11 years in the Vicariate of Zanzibar. The intrepid Father Le Roy (afterwards Arch- bishop) disgu!sed as an Arab peddler, made his way to the mainland of Kenya and began the mission of Mombassa. Other Fathers came and pushed into the intei*ior. Rome appointed Bishop de Courmont, first Vicar Apostolic of Zanzibar, a territory stretching from Guarda- fui in the Red Sea to Mozambique in the South. There was no western boundary. Today this vast territory is divided into 15 vicariates under "the care of various missionary Societies, but the Mother Church--the Vicariate of Zanzibar--is still under the jurisdiction of the Holy Ghost Fathers. The Need of the Hour Missionary Bishops have always been convinced of the necessity of native priests and the war has emphasized this need. It is the constant preoccupation of Bishop McCarthy of Zanzibar that worthy African boys be trained and educated to form a native clergy. When African priests work everywhere among their own people, then and only C I SOLONS WILL READ • MEASURES--SCHOOL BILL WAS HF.ADACHE the senate on Monday last unani- mously killed by indefinite post- ponement a bill which would have required parents to obtain ex- cuses from the superintendent of schools in order to send their children to private or parochial schools. Senator Thomas H. Bienz, Spo- kane, and Senator Lesie V. Mor- gan, Yakima, introduced the bill. Then the sparks began to fly. Telegrams and letters swamped Senator Bienz. Alarmed, he re- turned to Spokane to placate, if possiblef the angry parents who ,accused him of sponsoring an anti- Catholic measure. Never Read It "I didn't even read the bill," he confessed. "The last thing I would do would be to sponsor any meas- ure which would interfere with the right to send children to parocllial schools." Senator Bienz said he signed'the bill beoause Senator Morgan asked him to put his name on it. Senator Morgan said he, too, failed to read the bill, and that he signed it and asked Sen,ator Bienz to join him, because he was asked to in- troduce it by Joe Chandler, legis- lative representative or lobbyist for the Washington Education association. Red-faced, Senator Morgan moved Monday to postpone indefi- nitely the offensive bill. It died without a tear being shed for it. ST, MARTIN ABBEY SEEKS CRAFTSMEN: AS LAY BROTHERS LACEY. -- Further opportunity for tradesmen and craftsmen to follow their chosen work as mem- bers of a religious community is being offered to men by St. Mar- tin Abbey. In keeping with its goal to provide "mechanical and agricultural training on the col- lege level to its students, St. Mar- tin Abbey is at the present seek- ing young men with trade and craft training or who seek such educa- tion in conj,.mction with entering the Benedictine religious order. These men will assist in this pro- gram and serve as permanent members of the maintenance and then can we be assured of sustained effort and progress. Two wars construction corps. " causdd One ask and r htl I The Rev. Ansgar Hallen has ha:'e already irreparable damage, may ig Y'b ' Pen placed in charge of the lay- so, why this plan has not been carried out years ago. It is unfortun-I :" ....... .... Drainers ann ne will airect their ate, indeed. But there cannot be nahve pmests wthout proper forms-c ...... ........ ! .ommumry me aria prayer. tiDE and their formation requires noney. 1c is e nightmare oz an j Bishops in Africa. The building and maintenance of seminaries is a/D, 1_ 11 • the r work fvromer umeson Is drain on resources, yet the white mLssionaries can consider i ] i well done only when hey succeed in building up generous and noble |  * " | f • • I r n a n ned races rrovmclal 0I lriSll leade s area gthe ba do Notes on the Koreans A chaplain writes of his impr.essfons of the Koreans: "Out of the 29 million Koreans, about 250,000 are Catholics, and grand ones too. After a full course of instruction, they are kept on probation for 6 months, and if they prove themselves, are then admitted to Holy Baptism . . . Here in Inchon is an orphanage with 2 Irish, 2 French, and 16 Korean nuns. They have 100 orphans, and care "for 300 out patients daily in their dispensary. You would love Sister Philomena, one of the Irish Nuns; she indeed knows the bitterness of Japanese persecution humiliation, hunger and cold. During the occupation from Pearl Har- bor until a year go, the quns lived on grass. ?90% of the people are desperately poor; on all sides the direst poverty. The laps took everything but the soil and the weather. They must have taken the water, for although surrounded by the Yellow Sea, the Sea of Japan and the Korean Straights, there is little water for purposes of cleanliness. Water shortage perhaps accounts for the fact that practically all the natives have skin diseases." Holy Childhood News The Fourth Grade of Providence Academy, Vancouver writes: "We are enclosing a check for forty dollars for" the pagan babies we have ransomed. At Christmas time we sent you sixty dollars so we now have twenty ranms. Our Holy Childhood Club membeI:s are-glad to help other children to Heaven. The word of Christ must be spread to those who are not Catholics. We are glad to help the priests and sisters in this work." WAYNE RITTER, Secretary, Grade Four. African Floods and Droughts The striking contrast of two extremes is presented by two reports from White Fathers in different sections of Africa. Father Armand Lebel writes: "The rainy season is causing more trouble than usual this year. One of the arches of our mud school has crumbled. The native huts are melting, I might ay, like igloos unde a hot sun! Two bridges have been swept away. There is no telling when trucks will be able to get through again." Father Constant Durette reports: "This year"s drought is naking life hard for the natives. In some villages all I could get was a cup of water for washing and cooking. "With the rainy eason still two l months away, what are you going to do ?' I asked one of our converts. 'Nothing we can do about it,' was the stoical reply. At the mission we padlocked the well and get our water from a brook that has not yet dried up. The natives think this ridiculous: go to the brook for water when there is still water left in the well!" Christian Brothers DUBLIN, Ireland, Feb. 17.-- (NC)--Brother Patrick A. Glee- son has been appointed provincial of the American Province of the Christian Brothers of ,Ireland, which includes the United States, Canada, and Newfoundland. For the past ten years Brother Glee- son has been provincial consultor and director of studies at the American headquarters of the community, Santa Maria on Hud- son, West Park, N. Y. He succeeds the Rev. Brother Patrick J. Ryan, founder of the American Province of the Chris- tian Brothers of Ireland, who died recently at West Park, N. Y. Radio Programs Saturday, ,'ebruary 22, KOL, 7:30 to 8 p. m.--Ave Maria Hour. Sunday, Feb. 23, KIRO, 7 to 7:30 a. m,- Church of the Air. The Rev. Edward J. Taney will dis- cuss "The Tenth Command- ment." Since 1911... a name that has Sunday, Feb. 23, KOMO, 3 to 3:30 p.m. -- Catholic Hour. The Rt. key. Msgr. Fulton J. Sheen will deliver the address entitled "How to Meet Communism." Sunday, Fel 23, KXA, 3:30 to 3:45 p. m. -- Hour of St. Fran- cis. Sunday, Feb. 23, KOI 3:45 to 4 p. tin--Stories from The Digest. HARLAN S. CALLAHAN Sheriff King County Seattle, Wash. Notice of Sheriff's Sale of Real Estate STATE OF  WASHINGTON, County of King. ss. Sheriff's Office. By virtue of a Writ of Special Exe- cution issued out of the Honorable Su- perior Court of King County, on the merited the confidence of, the of Government Lot 61 32. Township 23 North,[ Range 6 E.W.M., described as follows:[ Catholic people of Seattle. Beginning at the quarter corner common to Section 32 and 33, said township and range, a n d running thence West 243.2 feet; thence North 212 feet to the Southerly bank of Cedar JOSEPH ,,". River: thence South 74:5' East 253.12 feet; thence South 142.6 feet to the point of beginning; levied on as the Manning & Sons property ofallofthesaiddefendants herein and each of them, to satisfy a judgment of a foreclosure of a mort- gage amounting to four hundred ten and 69/100 ($410.69) Dollars, interest -u,, u,l="'^r-I Directors and the cost of suit in favor of plain- tiff. Dated thL 24th day of January. 1947. HARLAN S. CALLAHAN, 1634 IJth Ave. EAst 7484 Sheriff. By L. E. ANDERSON, Deputy. First publication Feb• 7, 1947. Final publication. Mar 7. 1947. i Medical Mission iiii!i!iii Sister M. Barbara, M. D., of Wil- mington, Del., one of three Medi- cal Mission Sisters en route to Ranchi, India, where they will open a village hospital at Mandar. The new mission will be among the aboriginal tribes. Departure ceremonies for the Sisters were held at chapel of their mother- house, Fox Chase, Pa (NO Pb toe) ISTATE OFFICERS TO VISIT CHEHALIS, CENTRALIA K, C, CHEHALIS, Wn.--The Chehalis Knights of Columbus will john with the Centralia Knights at the local hall in welcoming the Very Rev. Joseph P. Dougherty, Chancellor of the Diocese and K. C. State Chap- lain, and George Hoffner, state deputy, on their official visit to the Twin City Councils on Febru- ary 26. Grand Knight Leo WaN dock is expecting a large turnout for the occasion. A iarge class of candidates is being readied for initiation in M, arch, and the date hinges on [ the procuring of a suitable hall for the ceremonies and the engag- ing of a place for the banquet. Chehalis is very short of both fa- cilities at the present time. Fathers and Sons Breakfast Another of the popular quar- terly Communion breakfasts spon- sored by the Chehalis Knights will be held on Sunday, Feb. 23, at St. Joseph church hall. Fathers and sons will breakf.ast together, after receiving Holy Communion. All Catholic men are invited to join them on this first Sunday of the Lenten Season. Judge John E. Murray of the Lewi County Superior Court will be the featured speaker. Kaufer Company Announces Two New Broadcasts The Kaufer Company, Catholic supply house, announces arrange- ments have been made with the Ave Maria Hour for two special programs, one for Palm Sunday and one for Easter Sunday, to be broadcast over Radio Station KOL. These will be on the air March 30 and April 6 at 4 p. m. There will also shortly be scheduled a rebroadcast of St. Madeline Sophie Barat dramati- zation, as requested by many. This saint was the foundress of the Re- ligious of The Sacred Heart whose local institution is Forest Ridge Convent. The Kaufer Company has brought a number of Catholic pro- grams to the Northwest. At pres- ent The Ava Maria .Hour may be heard on KOL at 7:30 p. m. each Saturday• The new program :"Stories from the Catholic Digest" is heard Sunday afternoons on KOL at 3:45 p. m. 95-YEAR-OLD ,JESUIT DIES CLEVELAND. -- Brother Jo- seph Nussbaumer, at 95 reputed to be the oldest Jesuit in the United i States, has died at St. Stanislaus Novitiate here. Born in Germany, Brother Nussbaumer came to the United States in 1888. , He entered the Society of Jesus in Germany in 1885. NORTHWEST PROGRESS ii 00Bishop Lane, MaryknOII Superior General, Visits Here En Route to Hawaii. (Continued from Page 1 h:m;:s: way of substitutions B:.shop Lane is as serene and un- Bishop Lane said the 9  o'clock Mass on Sunday, February 1'3, in Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church and spoke in Japanese to the parishioners. He also gave the sermon at the 10:30 Mass. In the afternoon a reception was held for His Excellency in the Parish Hall and this was attended by some 150 Japanese, Filipinos and Chi- nese.. Bishop Lane was a dinner guest Monday evening, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Kuo Pin TenD. Chi- nese Consul in Seattle. Both Mr. and Mrs. Tsao are converts to the faith. Third Visit To Seattle This was the Maryknoll Bishop's third visit to Seattle. :He em- barked in this city for Hong- Kong, in 1923, for his first trip to the Orient. He went to Man- churia two years later to open the mission there, leturning to .Maryknoll in 1929 for the chapter, and was elected to the-Council o the society, and made Rector of the Marylmoll Seminary. He passed through this city again in Friday, Febru(nW 21, 1947 RELIGIOUS ART PIdUl0000-* FOR CATHOLIC HOMES Ionsplnagnxf°;cV'" ." "ftt'!i ala" - ledj" prints are appreciated gifts for weddings and other oc- casions. BY MORGARI-- The delicately tinted pic- tures were formerly imported from Europe, now being pro- duced in U.S.A. acred Heart of Jesus Immaculate Heart of Mary Size 9x12 in., each, $4.00 BY CHAMBERSMany sizes. Priced $].50 to $20.00 The Last Supper, (his newest painting) Sacred Heart of Jesus Immaculate Heart of Mary BY DA VINCI-- The Last Supper, $2.25 to $40.00. Hundreds of other Old Masters as well as pictures by contemporary artists are always in stock. FOR LENTEN READING "The Lenten Missal," 54c up. Visit our Lending Library and beautiful book dept. 1932 enroute to Manchuria, hav- ing been made Prefect Apostolic of the Fushun Mission there. He was to serve continuously until 1946, save for a period in 1940-'41, when he returned to this country to be consecrated Bishop in his home city of Lawrence, Massa- chusetts. Bishop Lane left Seattle, Wed- uesday, for San Francisco, where he in to take ship on February The Kaufer Company hurried as a cloistered monk. Of the hardships he endured while a prisoner of the Japanese, he spzaks lightly, as one would of an !outing. Indignities offered by his 'captors were few. "lhe hardships, he says, were mainly lack of suf- ficient food. And the Ch:.nese Catholics valiantly lightened these I by a system of running contra- I band food to' the prisoners. Russians Were Pro-American At First Under the Russian occupation n Fushun there was much uncer- tainty and, at first, some indis- criminate shooting, the Bishop said. "At first, the Russians were very pro-American," His Excell- ency recalled. "The memory of substantial American contribu- tions of materiel to their forces was fresh in the soldiers' minds. The invaders rolled into Man- churia in American tanks, jeeps and Studebaker trucks. They greeted us with cheers for Amer- ica and its motors. With thumbs up, they cried, 'Studebaker Achin --Harashoi {Studebaker -- Very Good)'. The American motors had just brought them an impossible 2700 kilometers across the sands of the Gobi desert. They were vol- ubly grateful. Later, this pro- American attitude changed." U. S. State Dept. Got Bishop A Pass From Fushun, Bishop Lane went to Dairen, where until the arrival of the consuls in the spring of 1946 he was the only American in the Russian occupied city. After the American State Department exercised its good of- rices in his behalf, Bishop Lane was given a permit by the Russ- ians to depart from Dairen June 1946, and he returned to the United States to attend the gen- eral chapter of his society in Ma- ryknoll, N. Y. As Superior General of the Am- erican Foreign Mission Society, Bishop Lane directs over "Men of Maryknoll," 400' priests, 792 students preparing CATHOLIC SUPPLY HOUSE (Estab. 1904) "The Old Reliable Catholic Book Store" SEATTLE TACOMA • 1904 Fourth Ave. 74 Broadway (Near Stewart St.) MAin 2702 MAin 4:173 Stores also in Spokane, Wash.: Vancouver, B. C. 21 for Hawaii to visit Maryknoll! missioners in the islands. Mass At Marvknoll 'iA-Tfl-lfii/' Mo;e Catholics Church Sunday For NIGHT SET FOB H, N, n British Africa Bro. Amhrose, M.M. 00n00nruy aeUMNAE - Jnan in r.ngmno -- __ The 9 o'clock Mass next Sunday, in ROME.--Startling increases in! ........ I The annual "Back-To-School" m uur aay Mueen ot vtaryrs[ Nz ht for Hol  Nam. Academy he the number of Catholics in Brit- " - g 3 ;' • :' - - n- ish East and West Africa in the ]Church will be offered for Brother] Alumnae Assoc!ation will be held a- period from 1939 to 1946 attest to[Ambrose, M.M., who died in Hal- I Sunday eveuing, March 2, at 6:30 @ a prodigious missionary effort in ]land last week while visiting his o'clock at the A:ademy. n- the heart of the "Dark Continent". rail there All former students of Holy • la y • ,:, "'--- Aam- wh thor mere during the war years. There are] Na,,,.  /, '  - - - 12 now more Catholics in British At- [ Brother Ambrose, Christian J. hers of the Association or not, are Pets, rica than there are in England [VanKemten, was born in Holland invited to participate in the eve- for the and Wales it seems safe to say. d entered Mar knoll in ning of mus c" fun and games and ' m 1888 an Y ..... priesthood, 98 brothers. The Ma- According to figures released • . ..... to renew old fiend-hips hereby Fides mission news sPry- 1926. He served a ne os An- .... "_ ryknoll Si,ters numbering now • . ' • • . eies Mission und ne was rans- zce, the Cathohc populatmn xn   -  -  ..... , t. over 900, though under their own Tananvika iurnned from 429000 Iferred to the Maryknoll parmh or nLe ..........  v .......... administration, labSr in close co- . ;,J . C_^ ....... ' . fhere in 1941 where he served for the Lending Library a:d book de- operation with the Fathers and m ± co av,uuu m ±b; zn t - • - rtment of The Kaufer Co Uanda from 652000, to 861 two years. He has since neen eta- pa ., Brothers. To many these'figures 000. in' Kenya I from 145000 to lioned at the Maryknoll Seminary Cathoi!c Supply House. i904 ,tth I may seem large in view of the comparatively recent entrance of 248,000; in Nyassaiand, from 156,- in New York. Ave., Seattle. 00 to 251,000; in the Gold Coast, our country into the foreign mis- sion field. The total number of from 166,000 to 246,00; and in Sierra Leone, from 7,300 to7,900. D E E D E E - S American priests of all societies Statistics for tEe other British in .foreign mission work is very colonies in middle Africa; Ni- I small--something like one in thir- geria, Northern Rhodesia, and ty-s!x. The Diocese of Bruges in Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, are not Belgiumhas°neinthree'andlit- yetavailable'With°utthem'and B a ty Sh p tle Holland has more priests on without the total for the Union   O foreign missions than in the home of South Africa, British African O country. Within another decade Catholics number 2,214,000, as Amerma should be sending 1000 44 • " [against 2,4 ,000 for Eng],and and priests a year to the foreign mis- ]Wales" SPECIAL! SIDE, Bishop Lane believes. I A total of 232 African-born Maryknollers now are serving in priests now labor in the six col- China, Japan and Korea. They I antes reporting their figures, to- $12.50 PERMANENTS for $10.00 have missions, schools and hospi-[ gether with 109 African Brothers tale in Hawaii and in the Philip-land 1,057 African Sisters. OPERATORS pines, and there are 98 Mary- l knoll priests in South and Central[ The importance of iodine in the Jean McCracken and Frances Mclsaac America. Newest field for their diet for the control of certain apostolic service is in British-con- types of human goiter has been trolled Tanganyika Territory in one of the outstanding develop- 7413 Greenwood Ave. SUnset 6312 meEts in recent medical science. East Africa. Maryknoll undertook the African work in September tlge4;fTa:eaaI'Yi!?if:ifpri::dat"Africa is the most fruitful PUBLIC MARKET CENTER ECONOMY PIKE PLACE CORNER SANITARY WHERE THE BEST MEAT, GROCERIES, FISH AND VEGETABLES ARE SOLD MURRAY'S Pure Food Shop MEATS mission field in the world today," said Bishop Lane. Thi is due, His Excellency added, to the eagerness of the natives for instruction and to the cooperation of the British and Belgian officials with the work of the missioners. Recent reports the B.:shop has had from his priests in the African mission tell of fine opportunities, despite language difficulties. The lan- guage difficulties are multiplied by the fact that there are three tribes living in "the mission area. •his creates an administration dif- Delicatessen FULL UNE FRESH Hams & Bacon 1 5 11 PIKE PLACE MAin Z 9 7 5 CLASSIFIED ADS Rate: 20e ver line. Forms close Thursday a.m. COMPTOMETER SCHOOL HELP WANTED ENROLL NOW -- Day, Half-Day and CATHOLIC MAN OR WOMAN Even i n g Classes tn New Short A leading, old-line. Catholic B 24th day of January, 1947, by the clerk Streamlined Comptometer Course at publisher will have a representative: thereof in the case of Joseph Minor, the Comptometer School, Douglas in the Seattle-Tacoma arefi the Plaintiff, versus John L. Sopchak and Bldg.. MA. 8633 week of February 24th to train one l J'vlia A. Sopchak, his wife. Defend- person in Catholic book distribution ants. No. 378809, and to me, as Sheriff, RUGS & UPHOLSTERY CLEANED to lay-Catholics. Car and $200 in- directed a.nd. delivered: ....... fin your home: windows, woodwork vestment in stock required. Better rOtzce zs nereoy gzven, mat i wm I washed; floors cleaned and waxed, than average commission remunera- p oceed to sell at publm auction to the[ Exterior buildings steam cleaned highest bidder for cash, within the[ MOBILE STEAM CLEANERS ALl hours prescribed by law for Sheriff'sJ 5432 ' tf sales, to-wit at Ten o'Clock A M onl_ --" the 15th day of March, 1947, before the[ INCOME TAX CONSULTANT Court House door of King County, Jet- [ WILLIAM F. MILLER feron Street entrance, at Seattle, in J Your Tax Problems Solved number and name of your pastor, to the State of Washington, the following] (Seattle College Alumnus) Box S, care of The Progress. All described property, situated in Kingl 3rd & Marion correspondence confidential. State of Washington. to-wit: I tion. Splendid annual earnings. Ex- clusive territory. Life-time em meEt. Age immaterial. Sales ence helpful but not neeessar is a really good job. Write fully first letter, including your telephone EL. 2755 tf FOR SALE BY OWNER $4100. Nice home in Cathedral Parish. FOR SALE 7 blocks from Seattle College. Close- Four room house, immaculate condi- in, no racial discrimination. 2 bed- tiDE; large well-landscaped yard, rooms, living room, large bright kit- near St. Anthony Church• Call GR chert with.built-ins; hall, pantry and 1019. 2/.21/47 bah. Basemenl arae. which handyman could develop into 4-room apartment. Interior nicely redecorat- ed; outside neods oaint Terms can BUY OR SELL your home in West Seattle, 1 be arranged. 220 Eleventh Av. El, Seattle through Joe Casey, Agt., WE Until I0 P. M. 1784, 2/21/47 6126 or AV. 4500. _ ..yen ,,.ven.ns --5   FRUITS -- VEGETABLES -- GROCERi ES For three people. Please phone HE. 6694. tf NOTHING'S TOO GOOD FOR YOU PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT Why not for the children too? Chil- WANTED dren s custom-made coats as beauti- 83 P/] SgEET PHONE MkL 1826 BY exporting and importing firm, fully tailored as mother's and dad's fine hand-tailored suits.-No finer Ikll' l young male stenographer typist Re- ply giving full particulars, ace, edu- workmanship any place in Seattle. cation, exporience, salary. Write T. "CHILDREN'S COATS", CA. 6234. & N. c/o The Progress. 2-21-47 2/21/47. He@eft&Co. Sanitary Public Market First and Pike MAin 6996 Neupert's White Center Grocery 9465 Delridge Way AV. 0700 PATRONIZE PROGRESS ADVERTISERS