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Catholic Northwest Progress
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February 21, 1947     Catholic Northwest Progress
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February 21, 1947
 

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e O . -- _ . . Friciay ebma21, i9 7 =C A T'HO'L:I-C NOR T H"E S T P'ROG R ES S " .......  ............................................... ? ..................... ,,' tii'T I i % .................... f ....... f .... Ii "-''f'-T ......................................... ............................... il  " " Honor Gel00IOn Cardina! In N.Y. Cathedral PrelQt F eale! Opposed. Nazism In its Stronghold (N.C.W.C. News Service NEW YORK, Feb. 17 " Wel- comed as '-'an outstanding defend- er of man's God-given rights" and as "a hero for our Holy Faith," His Eminence Konrad Cardinal yon Preysing, Bishop of Berlin, was present in the sanctuary at solemn Mass yesterday in St. Pat- lic-k Cathedral, here. His Emin- ence Francis Cardinal Spe!Iman, Archbishop of New York, presided at the Mass at wh;ch a congrega- tioh bf 4,500 assisted. In the eve- ning, the visiting prelate was fet- ed at a public reception in the Cathedral Girls' High School aud- itorium. Cardinal yon Preysing occupied a red brocade throne erected on the Epistle side in the sanctuary. The German prelate, whose fear- less attacks upon nazism during its hey-day in its own stronghold won him world-wide renown, was welcomed to the Cathedral by Msgr. Joseph F. Flannelly, admin- istrator. "As Ainerieans," Monsignor Flannelly told the Cardinal in his welcome, "we at% delighted to regard you as an Outstanding defender of man's Ggd-given rights. AS Catholics, your pres- ence brings us joy because we esteem you as a hero for our Holy Faith. We thank God for the example of steadfastness in the Faith which He has provid- ed for us in you." James A. Farley formei  Post-l - ' . " - I master General, presided at the I reception. Cardinal spe|Iman inTI troduced Cardinal yon Preysing I and the speakers included Theo- I bold Dengler, New York attorney, I who only recently completed a mission with the merican Mili- tary Governme'nt in Germany. The Cardinal Bisrlop of Berlin in his response to the acclaim at the reception, said his primary motive for visiting the United States was to personally express the pro- found gratitude of his people "for the generous and marvelous char- ity of all Americans." He said it was an example of charity "that knows no bounds and excludes no one and is restoring to a discour- Berlin Cardinal 00EFENSE 00EM$ TO RAft iTS DAY 1N Arrives Wearing oR, TISO'S TSAL .Tiara of Worrie . (Special C0rrepondefit, N.C.W.C.. dP I ]JRATIeLAVv: er-Vsioee)ia, Feb. (Continued from Page 1) In the over-all picture there is 17 eRo) "As long as I am ,an absolute lack of fuel, thou-lpresient, nobody in Sldvakia Will sands of families being without be %6hdmned 'to death." anJ the b!ycle tires by his priests -rio lump 0 coal- hundreds of I Thi-s staOeient made in 1942 by are badly needed by all his people, to sbrve their Wollen parlshes in the outlying sections of hts see. H Eminence praises warmly and gratefully the extensive aid rehdered by War Relief Services National Catholic Welfare Con- ference, the CARE food packages and the assistance of the Bishop's War Emergency and Relief Com- mittee. "I have come"to America," he told me, "to thank the American people for all they have done and all they ake doing to aid my peo- ple. I t is. part also of my purpose to toll them omethihg of the misery and Want in Europe, Ger- many, epeciall Bhrlin, that their genorosity is helping to alleviate." I?,=stributed (Jhmstmas PfiJekags Peoill Last Christmas, :His Eminence related, he received a hundred CARE packages 9 f food from Archbishop John T. McN{cholas, O. i., of Cincinnati, Chairman of h e N.C.W.C. Administrative Board, and these he distri'buted personally as ar as they rould go, making each package serve a number of families. "I can't desc{ibe for you," he said, "the joy t brought, even when each_ package was divided among many beneficiaries. Wid- ows, with children and ol d people were the ones I made a special ef- fort to assist. The people wer e .quite 5slde themselves with happiness to receive a little but- {er, a iltti ,heat." Shoeso ireiy Nil Th lack of ho, and iJarticu- larly 1:he lack of Sols for uppers, pres'ets a Special prob!em.  The people made out Well enough while the weather was mild, but now that Europe i s e.xeriencing one of the worst winters in years, it is another matter, the Ca{'dinal s.ald. The people can not ,venture out of their homes, some of 'hich are crude shelters indeed. They cannot go to church; the children cannot attend school, and the priests experience the utlost dif- ficulty attending to their paro- chial duties. Yes, he added, shoes are a great need. tire Rev. Dr..J6eph Tiso, former[ president bf he ar time puppet[ Slovak.Rgime, "vlen a mother en--[ treated him .in ehalf of her son I whb had :been ffnddned to death[ for rehso by a lovak court, was recalled at the trial Of Dr. Tiso thousands of, persons are Without anything approximat:ng adequate shelter; w a r n: clothing and blankets are sorely ne.edd; hospi- t'als are heated but part time, and there is general undernourish- ment. 2he Cardinal said that 17 of trio lal-ge churches in hts Berlin dio- ch'e have been t0t|ly destroyed and a d0.en or mre have been badly damaged, briers have sut- lured lesshr detucti6n and many small chtpels have been reduced to i'uins. Th Cardinal makes it plain that he speaks chiefly about Bec- lin becat=e it is a Situation with which he is mbst familiar. But, he hasteiis to add, the piCtUre there is not much differeht fiom what it is in most large cities of Ger- manj,, and in fact in all of war- tbrn Europe. "T6day, more than ever before," he said, "America has become a land of iope and promise for the Weary people Of the Old World." New Ybrk was a source o{ con- ,tant amazement to Cardinal yon Pr'eysing on his first day in the United States He tasted the first ilk he had had in two years, found the tall bUildings, magn::fi- cent bridges and broad roadwaj/s the Veribable "fairyland" he had been told it Would be. But it was, perhaps, the whole- ness of the clty and the vigor of its busy life the{ impressecl hirfi most. He said he could not get over the experience of driving through a city without shattered windows and mere shells of houses to be viewed on every side. When the wheels of the Amer- ican commercial airplane touched the ground of the New York field. after some 30 hours of flight, Cardinal Spellman was on hand to greet the distinguished visitor. With Cardinal Spellman were Archbishop J. Francis A. McIn- tyro, Coadjutor of New York; and the Roy. Paul F. Tanner, Assist- ant General Secretary of the N.C.W.C., who is accompanying Cardinal yon Preysing on his visit to various Ameri.can cities. lefore the Slovak National Cou here. The former Slovak presi- dent, is being t/:ied with several of his War-time ininisters, on 113 separate charges, each of which :err:us the death penalty. A 27-year:Oll soldier, whose life I Dr. Tiso spared by commuting the death Sentence to life mprison- mont. appea;ed as a witness at the !atter's trial, if'he defense counsel was also n possession of aletter frbm the "soldier's mother relat- ing how her Son's life was spared but the court refdsed the defense's request to have it read. Tells of Nhzi Pressure 'Th defense also "gMned from te'stmOny Of Dr. Mai'tin Sokol, the fore-nor president of Slovak Parlia- ment. Dr. Sokol, who w/s recently re- leased by the Russians to appear at the trial, had taken an active part in the secret preparations for reconstructing Czechosl o v a k i a. While making it clear at the be- ginning of his testimony that there had never _beeii much friendship between himself and Dr. Tiso. he testified that the former presi- dent, whom he described as hav- ing been under constant and heavy pressure from the nazis, on several occasions intervened to prevent German brutalities. When the court stated that Dr Tlso must have been willing to accept re- sponsibility for the German atroci- ties in Slovakia and if not Willing he should have resigned, Dr. Sokol declared that such a resignation would have brought Slovakia even greater harm. POOgE SUPPRESS HUNGARIAN BISHOPS' PASTORAL LETTERS ROME -- (CIP) Cardinal aged and despairing continent its ] Mindszenty, Archbishop o Eszt- .... ergom and Primate of ;Hungary, faith and hope." ]f"  III /'  * " .CardiIl yon ]Prey.sing s00id. : h Wrlm* protestetl in a recent kddress in Ii 1 LllLIi I.  Budpa est against th d'sres, pee'hlS.Seeondary purpose m coming to the U. S. was to acquaint tile |   . u ,. . , , | for religious liberty shown ny the Pedestal, But P00cture Not rope generally. - |  -  a i    , Two pastoral letters Of the "Unless you have seen with your a, ll ] l/-I,, % NIl Hungarian Hierarchy, the Card- own eyes," the Cardinal said, "and ,!1 I.llll dK]7J I %. IIt,l inal declared, could not be pub- lived for years, as I have, in the fished because of a prohibition by midst of misery and squalor, it is difficult to realize fully the extent arid the severity of the tragedy which has befallen much o] Eu- rope. Some of the damage is b e- yond hope of repair; no one can zecall to life the millions of dead of all countries; no one can take away the emptiness and pain from the hearts of orphans, widows and Other bereaved survivors. Against hhis tragic background each single act of mercy shown to the sick and the dying, the starving an`d the shelterless, becomes something doubly precious and meritorious. Blessed indeed are the merciful. Since the war, Am. erica, more than ever before, has become a land of hope and promise for the weary people of the Old WOrld." MONTANA PRIEST BENEFIGIARY OF HALF MILLION WiLL PEORIA, ,Ill., Feb. 19.--The Rev. Frank J. Burns of Missoula, Mont., former Navy Chaplain, has been named principal beneficiary of an estate estimated at $500,000. The will of :4Iiss Agnes ThuG Thewlis, aged 86. was filed in probate court here this week. Father Burns recently returned to the Helena Diocese from duty with the U. S, Navy. The area of Continental United States in square miles is 3,738,393. (Continued from Page 1) ;gate, singing the familiar hymns of home parishes. just finished, they had .a force- If sometimes during the war ful incentive, now lacking, to GI Joe was painted in impossibly keep right with God. bight colors, he should not be Good Example Still 1M[arehes  poi-trayed in all-dark hues now. But good example {ill marches tip the aisle i.n an Amehcah Uni-[ form. in Tientsin lately, soe 800 Ik- rines attended the Week's mission conducted by Father R.bgiS Boule, C.P., of Pittsburgh, former. . Navy. chaplai now superio r 9 f the laS - sionist h6use in Peiping. Weekday noon and afternoon Masses in downtown Tokyo's Army-occupied bhildins are poor- ly attended, outside Lent. But in regularity an1 high percentage of daily commuflicarits, those little congregations, which include of- ficers, enlisted men anl civilians, are always impressive. Ever evening soldiers kneel for night prayers in tile Chapel of 1st Cavalry Division headquarters, T6kyo. General In Chblr Seou! , Korea,. offers an .impre.s- sire spectacle every Sunday morn- thg as Arneriah h01dirs climb the Stps, and jeetis tifi'd tff cars xoll up the steep incline" to the cathedral. I noticed that. smiling Father Thomas Robertson, chap- lain from Bt. piiul, hn., wore his hat)piest smiles as he Witched his GI congregation ei-6Vdihg !n for that 9 o'cl0'ck Mass. In the choir, c0nductd by Fahhr J-e{-dme Sweeney of St. Colun4Oan's mis- sions, you Wbu|l se G4ii. Archi- bald V. Arnold beside a buck pri- VNCOUVE Hamilton's Funeral Home RAY O. ANDREWS PAUL L. MYLAN Especially Equipped for Cath0ile Funerals 802 IV. llih Vancouver, Wash. Telephone 1157 Certainly. the Communist-inspired "demonstrations" against him in a few Chinese 'cities are unfair to him .and ciuite unrepi-esentative ot the Chinese people. GI Joe, whether a slightly be- wildered lad of 18 or a battle- wise re-enlistee of 24, is, as Gen- eral MacArthur has said, largely what his home traihing has made him. That training incIudes his school, companions, movies, ann magazines as well as his mother's teaching. His present circumstan- ces can press dangerously on Weak spots left unfortified by that training or produced by it. Thus S0*he oldiers of a victorious army met moral defeat. I rente-mlaer only two Gl's v'hbse names were really Joe. One, t red-head from Anstin, hrm., was a daffy eommumcant iii TRyo. So was the other. He wetit tick to Cincinnati, some months ago, to enter a iiovltit. Hdagafian Cardidal these authorities. AlmOst all Catholic activities, he stated, re- quire advance permission rom the police; religious processions, for instance, are allowed only if a special authorization is obtained- Although in the Hungarian elec- tions the moderate Smallholc[ers Party obtained a substantial ma- jority of votes, many key posts in the governm'ent are held by Communistists w h o owe their power to the Russian occupation army. HUNGARihN COURT SENTENCES BISHOP I BUDAPEST, Feb. 18.--(Radio,, NCI Bishop Stephen Zadravecz, O. F. M., Titular of Dometiopolis, has been sentenced to a four-year prison term as the aftermath of' his scond" trial since the end of the ar before a Hungarian Pc0-, pie's Court. Previously the pre- late had ]seen tried and sentenced to a 5%-year term which later was annulled by a court of ap- peals. The trial of the 62-year-old pre- late had been followed with great interest by the people of this city, Direct Plea To where many regard him as a hero. S Large crowds of admirers flocked P00esident Truman it the hearings and many knelt i to receive his blessing as he en- tered and left the court room. BUDAPEST. Feb. 17 (Rad:,o.- VIUE-CAMERLENGO DIES NC)-His Em:ncnce Joseph Cardi- VATICAN CITY. Feb. 18. (Ra- nal Mindszen{y, Primate of Hun-idio, NC} Archbishop Tito Troc- giry, has sent a cable to Presi-!chi. and Vice-Camerlengo of the tent Harry Truman and King I Holy Roman Church, has died George VI of England pleading]here at the age of 82. He was or- the case of the 700,000 Hungar- dained in 1887 and consecrated in i ans being deported from Slovakia. 1915. Previously the Cardinal had made i svel-al public statements deplor- I JO H NbfL. FITZPAtRiCK Smitli Tower, ing the inhumane eircumstahces] Seattle 4, Washington in Which the deportations were be- IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for the County ing carried out. of King.--In Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of James Crdinal Mindszenty had also Ward. deeeased.--No. 101148.--Notice to Creditors. issued ,i lette rhqdcst!ng the in- I Notice is hereby given that the un- habitants of Budapest to hold de-dez'signed has been appointed and has votions in honor of the Holy Eu- qualified as Executor of the estate of James Ward. deceased, tliat all persons charist on the day that Hungary having claims against said deceased are signs the peace treaty, and to hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Executor or his keep a watch before the relic of iattorney of xecord at the address be- the right bahd of St. Stephen, low stated, and file the same with t.._ ' t Clerk of said Cotwt, together with king and patron of Hungary. proof of such service within e.x months after the date of first publica- tion of this notice, or the same will be JUNEAU LEAGU O barred. . i:I. MEET, SUNDAY Frt ,hlicalion February 21. 1947 1 REVEREND.E.J. McFADDEN. Execut-I JUNEAU--The League of the or of said Etpte. Address: 1706 Smith ] Tower. Seattle 4. Wash. ] Sacred Heart will meet in the JOHN L. FITZPATRICK, Attorney fog church after benediction at 8 p. m. ' Estate, ]706 Smith Tower, Seattle 4. ! Wash . . ] Sunday, Fcb. 23. Final publication March 7, 1947. :.New Ordiner00 Most Rev. Geqrge Joseph Don- nblly, AuxiliaiT Bishop of St. Louis since 140, who. has been named BiShop of the Diocese of Leavenwortfi, guns. Born in Ma- plewoocl, Mo., in. 1889 h was or- dained in 1921 and e6nsecrated St. Louip in 1940. Photo y Belkeh (NC Pllotoa) i:R, O*i00EiLLY-AMONG THOSE TAKEN OFF S, NORTH SEA "Ihe Rev. Patrick J. O'Reilly, S. J., 75-year-old veteran of mis- sion work in Alaska and the Northwest, was among the 86 passengers taken off the S. S. North Sea, Friday morning, when the Seattle-bound ship Which went aground near Belle Bella, B. C. Father O'Reilly was en route from Ketchikan to Portland to re- ceive a new assignment in mis- sionary work. He had been serv- ing as pastor at Sitka. Father O'Reilly is reported none the worse for his experiences and now resting at the Jesuit Noviti- ate, Sherican, Ore. Ship Moved Hospital The North Sea, on which Father O'Reilly sailed from Ketchikan, had been chartered, the first of this month, to move the Govern- merit Sanitarium for Indians from Skagway to Sitka. The Sisters of St. Ann have, been in charge Of the Sanitaxium for many years. The ship moved the Indian pati- ents. sisters and other personnel and hospital equipment in one trip. The sanitarium now is established at Sitka in buildings formerly used by U. S. armed forces. Fr, Albutt, Juneau Pastor00 Is Guest of Seattle Serra Club The Rev. Clifford Albutt, S.J., pastor of the Catholic Church in juneau, Was a guest 5f the Seattle Serra Club at its luncheon meet- ing, Friday, in the Go,n-nan Ho- tel. Father Albutt assisted in or- ganizing the Fairbanks Serra Club when he was stationed in that city. Father Albutt returned to Ju- neau, Saturday. He was in Seattle a few days on 'busines and made China's Envoy Welcomed By ffoly Father " _  none." His I--Ioli- "It is a gesture of pm'ticular consideration which will not-only be appreciated. ,n all its import- ance by the entire Catholic world," he continued. "but above all it will be greeted by the 'Catholics of China with profound satisfaction and lively gratitude' Dr. Wu, in presenting his cre- dentials, had spoken of fhe ser- ious duties that now face man- kind, and the Holy Father com- mented on this by saylng that "there is na plaee, where such a statement could find a truer echo than in the house ef the father of Christianity, who cher- ishes an equal benevolence for all peoples,, regardless of any limitations of time and space, or nrigin and language, of race and culture." "Today," he added, "discord and conflicting interests still divide the nations a tragic consequence of the dreadful war. But in every country the more noble, farseeing and mature minds have learned in the school of suffer:.ng m the re- cent pa,t that despite all their differences they "have a common element so essential that no one can tamper with it without im- periling the very foundations and prosperity of his own people." "As an outstanding jurist and member of legislative co,m-his- sions and internhti0nal confer- enees Your Excellency is in a Ietter positlon than many oth- ers to judge how far the present results Obtained by the ilers of the nations eoneerning the fun- damentals of a secure and last- ing peace have satisfied er de- luded the legitimate expctat|ons of humanity," the Pontiff told China's envoy. "It is because we notice that Your Excellency, an authority in postwar international questions, affirms principles of brotherhood and love among nations as indis- pensable factors of international justice," he noted, "that our hope increases "that such sentiments be ealized and that they may over- come the opposing forces that aim at preventing or delaying the ad- vent of a true pece." Y.. L i. Initiate Twenty-two VANCOUVER, Feb. 19.--St. James Institute of the Y. L. I. met last Friday in the parish hall with the president, Mrs. Lillian Orth- mann presiding. Highlight of the evening was the Tnitiation of 22 candidates. Miss Madalon Babcock, presi- dent of the newly organized Past Presidents Club announced a party on April 11 to be gwen for all who transferred from associate to beneficial membership. Plans were also made to assist with the USO work being carried on at Barnes Hospital. Members were addressed 'by Miss Mable Barlow. district deputy from Seattle, Wash., and by Mrs. Helen Hanson, institute deputy from Portland. The Roy. Connor McGreevy, Rev. Patrick McNerny and Roy. Joseph Vogel also talked briefly. Officers assisting the president in the nitiation ceremonies were the round trip by plane. Mrs. Delima Pechin. Miss Theresa Downey, Mrs. Dors %'astradowski, er and Mrs. Alice Granatir. Those serving on the flag team Pet sburg Altar for the initiation were: Miss Dor- othy Lechnit Miss Lucille Mad- SOciety [ntefiains Geo Hutchison Miss LaVern Muench, iss Anne Was- tradowski and Miss Claire M. Wrangell Group 955 mpire Bldg. Seattle 4, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for King County By MONICA FINN In Probate. PETERSBURG, AlaSka, Feb. 15 In the Matter of the Estate of Albert M. Berger, Deeeased.--No. 100734--- Last Week end the members of Notice to Creditors. Notice is hereby gven that the un- the Petersburg Altar Society of dersigned has been appointed and has St. Catherine's C h u r c h w e r e qualified as Administratrix of the es- tate of Albert M. Burger. Deceased; hostesses to the Altar Society of that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby required to W'angell. The.group of 10 mum- ser4e the same. duly verified, on said b.rs came to Petersburg on Sat- Hazel B. Burger or her attorneys of] record at the address below stated, I lTday" on the RADAR owned by and file the same with t!e ?/irk oo Mr. Lee Ellls. The w0men were said Court, together xvt p I such service within six months after l enttained at dinndr at the the date of first publication of this no-I American Legion Hall at :30 tlee, or the same will be barred. [ First publication February 14, 1947.[ p. m. A short business meeting HAZEL B. BERGER. Administratrix followed the dinner. The evening of said Estate. Address 955 Empire Bldg.. Seattle 4. Wash." was spent playing bingo and pinG- STUNTZ & HICKS. Attorneys for Es- tate. 955 Empire Bldg., Seattle, 4. chle. The prizes were won by Mrs. Wash. Wonders and Mrs. Nolan of Final Publication, March 7. 1947. wrangell. Mrs. Ray Sembe{-g and PATRICK A. GERAGITY Mrs. Norman Guthrie of Peters- SGS Empire Bldg. Seattle 4. Wash. burg were in charge of the ar- IN THE SUPERIOR COURr OF THE State of Washington for King County rangements for the dinner. --In Probate. On Sunday at l0 a. m.. the In the Matter of the Estate of Rose S. Aekerman. Deceased.--No. 100999. Wrangell choir joined the Peters- --Notice to Creditors. burg choir in the ngin of a Notice is hereby ven that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has Hgh M-ass wh:'ch Was offered bv oualified as Executor of the estate of Wr. Hoch. The Altar boy from Ro" S. Ackerman. Deceased; fhat all per!":-s having claims against said de- Wangell served the Mass. eeasod are hereby required to serve the same. duly verified, on said Ex- The following Altar Society eeutor or his attorney of record al the mombers came from Wrangell: address below stated, and file the same Mrs. Ronald Schwartz. pres- with the Clerk of said Court, toether with proof of such service within six months after the date of first publica-, ident; Mi-s. race Millis. secre- tion of this nolice, or the same will be I tarv: Mrs. Erhma Case. Mrs. Jus- barred. to Herriadez, Mrs. John Everson. FirCt p.b]icafion February 14, 1947. 1 CYRIL H. ACKERMAN, Execntor of Mrs. Bertha Christiansen, Mi.s said Estate. Address 865 Empire| Building'. Seattle. Wash. Marie Mullins. Miss OrDha Rag- PATRICK A. GERAGHTY. Attorney t lin, Mrs. Guggenbickler. Mrs. for Estate. 865 Empire Building. Se- attic. Wash W6nders, and Irs. Roy Nolan. Final PublicatiOn. March 7. 1947. Power flows through Puget Sound Giafit cables laid Puget Sound bring power to the Olympic Peninsula - and the great Bremerton Navy Yards. They stretch from Rich- mond Beach to Presi- ........ ddht's Poinma di-* tance of over four - -miles. Another of the Iitt[e known, but ira- ' p0rtant items in the investment value of a large power System. Easter 'is on the way  Turn your thoughts to i. Easter with emphasis on new clothes for you and the family, and thoughtful_Easter gifts for loved ones ..... Then turn to Rhodes for yourselection. - Second at Union MAin 8000 1, HOMe,OWNeO .o. Fr. ffConnor Attends Federal Housing Meet In Juneau 2UNEAU, Fb. 14. The Rev. Paul C. O'Connor, S.J., pastor of Hooper Bay is in Juneau to at- tend a meeting of the Federal Housing AdminiStration board ot Which he is a meifiber. Father O'C6nnor has ,authored a number of books and many maga- zine articles. His versatile pen has helped support the missions he has personally sei-ved in the North- 1,and. Iis lats bb0k, "Eskimo Parish," came off the Bruce Pub- lishing c0miany's {-esse early this ye/r. It !s .a thrilling account of the :_klaska Missioner's adven- tures with ae Innuit Eskimos to Wiom he was priest, doctor and cherished friend. English Diocese To Build 40 Schools LONDON. (NC)--Forty mod- ern schools are scheduled to be built in the Southwark diocese, covering south-east England and London South of the river "ITlames, Lo meet the demands of the edu- cational reforms legalized in the Education Act of 1944. VISIT sons AT ST. 5IARTIN W'ENATCHEIiI--Mr. and Mrs. 3oe Monda and Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Abair, spent the week end at st. Martin College, at Lacey, vis- iting with their sons Joe and George Monde and Joe Abair. JON L. FITZPATRICK, 1706 Smith Tower, Seattle, Wshington IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for the County of King. In Probate. In the matter of the Estate of Mary A. Schellin, deceased.--No. 100952.--No- tice to Creditors. Notice is hereby given that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as Executor of the estate of Mary A. Schellin, Deceased, that all persons having claims against sald de- ceased are hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Albert Schellin, Executor,or hls attorney of record at the address below sthted, and file the same with the Clerk of said Court, together with proo of Such ervice within ix m0nths after the date of first publication of this notice, or the same will be barred. Date of First pubIication February 21, 1947. ALBERT SCHELLIN, Executor of said Estate. Address: 1706 Smith Tover. Seatqe, Washington. JOHN L. FITZPATRICK. Attorney for Estate, 1706 Smith Tower. Seattle, Washington. Final publication March 7. 1947. HOME LOANS' -To refinance, buy, build or improve* G.I. LOAN -- FHA LOANS Prudential Savings & Loan Association STEPHEN S. SELAK, Pres. Third Ave. & Spring MAin 3200 i i  i i e O . -- _ . . Friciay ebma21, i9 7 =C A T'HO'L:I-C NOR T H"E S T P'ROG R ES S " .......  ............................................... ? ..................... ,,' tii'T I i % .................... f ....... f .... Ii "-''f'-T ......................................... ............................... il  " " Honor Gel00IOn Cardina! In N.Y. Cathedral PrelQt F eale! Opposed. Nazism In its Stronghold (N.C.W.C. News Service NEW YORK, Feb. 17 " Wel- comed as '-'an outstanding defend- er of man's God-given rights" and as "a hero for our Holy Faith," His Eminence Konrad Cardinal yon Preysing, Bishop of Berlin, was present in the sanctuary at solemn Mass yesterday in St. Pat- lic-k Cathedral, here. His Emin- ence Francis Cardinal Spe!Iman, Archbishop of New York, presided at the Mass at wh;ch a congrega- tioh bf 4,500 assisted. In the eve- ning, the visiting prelate was fet- ed at a public reception in the Cathedral Girls' High School aud- itorium. Cardinal yon Preysing occupied a red brocade throne erected on the Epistle side in the sanctuary. The German prelate, whose fear- less attacks upon nazism during its hey-day in its own stronghold won him world-wide renown, was welcomed to the Cathedral by Msgr. Joseph F. Flannelly, admin- istrator. "As Ainerieans," Monsignor Flannelly told the Cardinal in his welcome, "we at% delighted to regard you as an Outstanding defender of man's Ggd-given rights. AS Catholics, your pres- ence brings us joy because we esteem you as a hero for our Holy Faith. We thank God for the example of steadfastness in the Faith which He has provid- ed for us in you." James A. Farley formei  Post-l - ' . " - I master General, presided at the I reception. Cardinal spe|Iman inTI troduced Cardinal yon Preysing I and the speakers included Theo- I bold Dengler, New York attorney, I who only recently completed a mission with the merican Mili- tary Governme'nt in Germany. The Cardinal Bisrlop of Berlin in his response to the acclaim at the reception, said his primary motive for visiting the United States was to personally express the pro- found gratitude of his people "for the generous and marvelous char- ity of all Americans." He said it was an example of charity "that knows no bounds and excludes no one and is restoring to a discour- Berlin Cardinal 00EFENSE 00EM$ TO RAft iTS DAY 1N Arrives Wearing oR, TISO'S TSAL .Tiara of Worrie . (Special C0rrepondefit, N.C.W.C.. dP I ]JRATIeLAVv: er-Vsioee)ia, Feb. (Continued from Page 1) In the over-all picture there is 17 eRo) "As long as I am ,an absolute lack of fuel, thou-lpresient, nobody in Sldvakia Will sands of families being without be %6hdmned 'to death." anJ the b!ycle tires by his priests -rio lump 0 coal- hundreds of I Thi-s staOeient made in 1942 by are badly needed by all his people, to sbrve their Wollen parlshes in the outlying sections of hts see. H Eminence praises warmly and gratefully the extensive aid rehdered by War Relief Services National Catholic Welfare Con- ference, the CARE food packages and the assistance of the Bishop's War Emergency and Relief Com- mittee. "I have come"to America," he told me, "to thank the American people for all they have done and all they ake doing to aid my peo- ple. I t is. part also of my purpose to toll them omethihg of the misery and Want in Europe, Ger- many, epeciall Bhrlin, that their genorosity is helping to alleviate." I?,=stributed (Jhmstmas PfiJekags Peoill Last Christmas, :His Eminence related, he received a hundred CARE packages 9 f food from Archbishop John T. McN{cholas, O. i., of Cincinnati, Chairman of h e N.C.W.C. Administrative Board, and these he distri'buted personally as ar as they rould go, making each package serve a number of families. "I can't desc{ibe for you," he said, "the joy t brought, even when each_ package was divided among many beneficiaries. Wid- ows, with children and ol d people were the ones I made a special ef- fort to assist. The people wer e .quite 5slde themselves with happiness to receive a little but- {er, a iltti ,heat." Shoeso ireiy Nil Th lack of ho, and iJarticu- larly 1:he lack of Sols for uppers, pres'ets a Special prob!em.  The people made out Well enough while the weather was mild, but now that Europe i s e.xeriencing one of the worst winters in years, it is another matter, the Ca{'dinal s.ald. The people can not ,venture out of their homes, some of 'hich are crude shelters indeed. They cannot go to church; the children cannot attend school, and the priests experience the utlost dif- ficulty attending to their paro- chial duties. Yes, he added, shoes are a great need. tire Rev. Dr..J6eph Tiso, former[ president bf he ar time puppet[ Slovak.Rgime, "vlen a mother en--[ treated him .in ehalf of her son I whb had :been ffnddned to death[ for rehso by a lovak court, was recalled at the trial Of Dr. Tiso thousands of, persons are Without anything approximat:ng adequate shelter; w a r n: clothing and blankets are sorely ne.edd; hospi- t'als are heated but part time, and there is general undernourish- ment. 2he Cardinal said that 17 of trio lal-ge churches in hts Berlin dio- ch'e have been t0t|ly destroyed and a d0.en or mre have been badly damaged, briers have sut- lured lesshr detucti6n and many small chtpels have been reduced to i'uins. Th Cardinal makes it plain that he speaks chiefly about Bec- lin becat=e it is a Situation with which he is mbst familiar. But, he hasteiis to add, the piCtUre there is not much differeht fiom what it is in most large cities of Ger- manj,, and in fact in all of war- tbrn Europe. "T6day, more than ever before," he said, "America has become a land of iope and promise for the Weary people Of the Old World." New Ybrk was a source o{ con- ,tant amazement to Cardinal yon Pr'eysing on his first day in the United States He tasted the first ilk he had had in two years, found the tall bUildings, magn::fi- cent bridges and broad roadwaj/s the Veribable "fairyland" he had been told it Would be. But it was, perhaps, the whole- ness of the clty and the vigor of its busy life the{ impressecl hirfi most. He said he could not get over the experience of driving through a city without shattered windows and mere shells of houses to be viewed on every side. When the wheels of the Amer- ican commercial airplane touched the ground of the New York field. after some 30 hours of flight, Cardinal Spellman was on hand to greet the distinguished visitor. With Cardinal Spellman were Archbishop J. Francis A. McIn- tyro, Coadjutor of New York; and the Roy. Paul F. Tanner, Assist- ant General Secretary of the N.C.W.C., who is accompanying Cardinal yon Preysing on his visit to various Ameri.can cities. lefore the Slovak National Cou here. The former Slovak presi- dent, is being t/:ied with several of his War-time ininisters, on 113 separate charges, each of which :err:us the death penalty. A 27-year:Oll soldier, whose life I Dr. Tiso spared by commuting the death Sentence to life mprison- mont. appea;ed as a witness at the !atter's trial, if'he defense counsel was also n possession of aletter frbm the "soldier's mother relat- ing how her Son's life was spared but the court refdsed the defense's request to have it read. Tells of Nhzi Pressure 'Th defense also "gMned from te'stmOny Of Dr. Mai'tin Sokol, the fore-nor president of Slovak Parlia- ment. Dr. Sokol, who w/s recently re- leased by the Russians to appear at the trial, had taken an active part in the secret preparations for reconstructing Czechosl o v a k i a. While making it clear at the be- ginning of his testimony that there had never _beeii much friendship between himself and Dr. Tiso. he testified that the former presi- dent, whom he described as hav- ing been under constant and heavy pressure from the nazis, on several occasions intervened to prevent German brutalities. When the court stated that Dr Tlso must have been willing to accept re- sponsibility for the German atroci- ties in Slovakia and if not Willing he should have resigned, Dr. Sokol declared that such a resignation would have brought Slovakia even greater harm. POOgE SUPPRESS HUNGARIAN BISHOPS' PASTORAL LETTERS ROME -- (CIP) Cardinal aged and despairing continent its ] Mindszenty, Archbishop o Eszt- .... ergom and Primate of ;Hungary, faith and hope." ]f"  III /'  * " .CardiIl yon ]Prey.sing s00id. : h Wrlm* protestetl in a recent kddress in Ii 1 LllLIi I.  Budpa est against th d'sres, pee'hlS.Seeondary purpose m coming to the U. S. was to acquaint tile |   . u ,. . , , | for religious liberty shown ny the Pedestal, But P00cture Not rope generally. - |  -  a i    , Two pastoral letters Of the "Unless you have seen with your a, ll ] l/-I,, % NIl Hungarian Hierarchy, the Card- own eyes," the Cardinal said, "and ,!1 I.llll dK]7J I %. IIt,l inal declared, could not be pub- lived for years, as I have, in the fished because of a prohibition by midst of misery and squalor, it is difficult to realize fully the extent arid the severity of the tragedy which has befallen much o] Eu- rope. Some of the damage is b e- yond hope of repair; no one can zecall to life the millions of dead of all countries; no one can take away the emptiness and pain from the hearts of orphans, widows and Other bereaved survivors. Against hhis tragic background each single act of mercy shown to the sick and the dying, the starving an`d the shelterless, becomes something doubly precious and meritorious. Blessed indeed are the merciful. Since the war, Am. erica, more than ever before, has become a land of hope and promise for the weary people of the Old WOrld." MONTANA PRIEST BENEFIGIARY OF HALF MILLION WiLL PEORIA, ,Ill., Feb. 19.--The Rev. Frank J. Burns of Missoula, Mont., former Navy Chaplain, has been named principal beneficiary of an estate estimated at $500,000. The will of :4Iiss Agnes ThuG Thewlis, aged 86. was filed in probate court here this week. Father Burns recently returned to the Helena Diocese from duty with the U. S, Navy. The area of Continental United States in square miles is 3,738,393. (Continued from Page 1) ;gate, singing the familiar hymns of home parishes. just finished, they had .a force- If sometimes during the war ful incentive, now lacking, to GI Joe was painted in impossibly keep right with God. bight colors, he should not be Good Example Still 1M[arehes  poi-trayed in all-dark hues now. But good example {ill marches tip the aisle i.n an Amehcah Uni-[ form. in Tientsin lately, soe 800 Ik- rines attended the Week's mission conducted by Father R.bgiS Boule, C.P., of Pittsburgh, former. . Navy. chaplai now superio r 9 f the laS - sionist h6use in Peiping. Weekday noon and afternoon Masses in downtown Tokyo's Army-occupied bhildins are poor- ly attended, outside Lent. But in regularity an1 high percentage of daily commuflicarits, those little congregations, which include of- ficers, enlisted men anl civilians, are always impressive. Ever evening soldiers kneel for night prayers in tile Chapel of 1st Cavalry Division headquarters, T6kyo. General In Chblr Seou! , Korea,. offers an .impre.s- sire spectacle every Sunday morn- thg as Arneriah h01dirs climb the Stps, and jeetis tifi'd tff cars xoll up the steep incline" to the cathedral. I noticed that. smiling Father Thomas Robertson, chap- lain from Bt. piiul, hn., wore his hat)piest smiles as he Witched his GI congregation ei-6Vdihg !n for that 9 o'cl0'ck Mass. In the choir, c0nductd by Fahhr J-e{-dme Sweeney of St. Colun4Oan's mis- sions, you Wbu|l se G4ii. Archi- bald V. Arnold beside a buck pri- VNCOUVE Hamilton's Funeral Home RAY O. ANDREWS PAUL L. MYLAN Especially Equipped for Cath0ile Funerals 802 IV. llih Vancouver, Wash. Telephone 1157 Certainly. the Communist-inspired "demonstrations" against him in a few Chinese 'cities are unfair to him .and ciuite unrepi-esentative ot the Chinese people. GI Joe, whether a slightly be- wildered lad of 18 or a battle- wise re-enlistee of 24, is, as Gen- eral MacArthur has said, largely what his home traihing has made him. That training incIudes his school, companions, movies, ann magazines as well as his mother's teaching. His present circumstan- ces can press dangerously on Weak spots left unfortified by that training or produced by it. Thus S0*he oldiers of a victorious army met moral defeat. I rente-mlaer only two Gl's v'hbse names were really Joe. One, t red-head from Anstin, hrm., was a daffy eommumcant iii TRyo. So was the other. He wetit tick to Cincinnati, some months ago, to enter a iiovltit. Hdagafian Cardidal these authorities. AlmOst all Catholic activities, he stated, re- quire advance permission rom the police; religious processions, for instance, are allowed only if a special authorization is obtained- Although in the Hungarian elec- tions the moderate Smallholc[ers Party obtained a substantial ma- jority of votes, many key posts in the governm'ent are held by Communistists w h o owe their power to the Russian occupation army. HUNGARihN COURT SENTENCES BISHOP I BUDAPEST, Feb. 18.--(Radio,, NCI Bishop Stephen Zadravecz, O. F. M., Titular of Dometiopolis, has been sentenced to a four-year prison term as the aftermath of' his scond" trial since the end of the ar before a Hungarian Pc0-, pie's Court. Previously the pre- late had ]seen tried and sentenced to a 5%-year term which later was annulled by a court of ap- peals. The trial of the 62-year-old pre- late had been followed with great interest by the people of this city, Direct Plea To where many regard him as a hero. S Large crowds of admirers flocked P00esident Truman it the hearings and many knelt i to receive his blessing as he en- tered and left the court room. BUDAPEST. Feb. 17 (Rad:,o.- VIUE-CAMERLENGO DIES NC)-His Em:ncnce Joseph Cardi- VATICAN CITY. Feb. 18. (Ra- nal Mindszen{y, Primate of Hun-idio, NC} Archbishop Tito Troc- giry, has sent a cable to Presi-!chi. and Vice-Camerlengo of the tent Harry Truman and King I Holy Roman Church, has died George VI of England pleading]here at the age of 82. He was or- the case of the 700,000 Hungar- dained in 1887 and consecrated in i ans being deported from Slovakia. 1915. Previously the Cardinal had made i svel-al public statements deplor- I JO H NbfL. FITZPAtRiCK Smitli Tower, ing the inhumane eircumstahces] Seattle 4, Washington in Which the deportations were be- IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for the County ing carried out. of King.--In Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of James Crdinal Mindszenty had also Ward. deeeased.--No. 101148.--Notice to Creditors. issued ,i lette rhqdcst!ng the in- I Notice is hereby given that the un- habitants of Budapest to hold de-dez'signed has been appointed and has votions in honor of the Holy Eu- qualified as Executor of the estate of James Ward. deceased, tliat all persons charist on the day that Hungary having claims against said deceased are signs the peace treaty, and to hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Executor or his keep a watch before the relic of iattorney of xecord at the address be- the right bahd of St. Stephen, low stated, and file the same with t.._ ' t Clerk of said Cotwt, together with king and patron of Hungary. proof of such service within e.x months after the date of first publica- tion of this notice, or the same will be JUNEAU LEAGU O barred. . i:I. MEET, SUNDAY Frt ,hlicalion February 21. 1947 1 REVEREND.E.J. McFADDEN. Execut-I JUNEAU--The League of the or of said Etpte. Address: 1706 Smith ] Tower. Seattle 4. Wash. ] Sacred Heart will meet in the JOHN L. FITZPATRICK, Attorney fog church after benediction at 8 p. m. ' Estate, ]706 Smith Tower, Seattle 4. ! Wash . . ] Sunday, Fcb. 23. Final publication March 7, 1947. :.New Ordiner00 Most Rev. Geqrge Joseph Don- nblly, AuxiliaiT Bishop of St. Louis since 140, who. has been named BiShop of the Diocese of Leavenwortfi, guns. Born in Ma- plewoocl, Mo., in. 1889 h was or- dained in 1921 and e6nsecrated St. Louip in 1940. Photo y Belkeh (NC Pllotoa) i:R, O*i00EiLLY-AMONG THOSE TAKEN OFF S, NORTH SEA "Ihe Rev. Patrick J. O'Reilly, S. J., 75-year-old veteran of mis- sion work in Alaska and the Northwest, was among the 86 passengers taken off the S. S. North Sea, Friday morning, when the Seattle-bound ship Which went aground near Belle Bella, B. C. Father O'Reilly was en route from Ketchikan to Portland to re- ceive a new assignment in mis- sionary work. He had been serv- ing as pastor at Sitka. Father O'Reilly is reported none the worse for his experiences and now resting at the Jesuit Noviti- ate, Sherican, Ore. Ship Moved Hospital The North Sea, on which Father O'Reilly sailed from Ketchikan, had been chartered, the first of this month, to move the Govern- merit Sanitarium for Indians from Skagway to Sitka. The Sisters of St. Ann have, been in charge Of the Sanitaxium for many years. The ship moved the Indian pati- ents. sisters and other personnel and hospital equipment in one trip. The sanitarium now is established at Sitka in buildings formerly used by U. S. armed forces. Fr, Albutt, Juneau Pastor00 Is Guest of Seattle Serra Club The Rev. Clifford Albutt, S.J., pastor of the Catholic Church in juneau, Was a guest 5f the Seattle Serra Club at its luncheon meet- ing, Friday, in the Go,n-nan Ho- tel. Father Albutt assisted in or- ganizing the Fairbanks Serra Club when he was stationed in that city. Father Albutt returned to Ju- neau, Saturday. He was in Seattle a few days on 'busines and made China's Envoy Welcomed By ffoly Father " _  none." His Holi- "It is a gesture of pm'ticular consideration which will not-only be appreciated. ,n all its import- ance by the entire Catholic world," he continued. "but above all it will be greeted by the 'Catholics of China with profound satisfaction and lively gratitude' Dr. Wu, in presenting his cre- dentials, had spoken of fhe ser- ious duties that now face man- kind, and the Holy Father com- mented on this by saylng that "there is na plaee, where such a statement could find a truer echo than in the house ef the father of Christianity, who cher- ishes an equal benevolence for all peoples,, regardless of any limitations of time and space, or nrigin and language, of race and culture." "Today," he added, "discord and conflicting interests still divide the nations a tragic consequence of the dreadful war. But in every country the more noble, farseeing and mature minds have learned in the school of suffer:.ng m the re- cent pa,t that despite all their differences they "have a common element so essential that no one can tamper with it without im- periling the very foundations and prosperity of his own people." "As an outstanding jurist and member of legislative co,m-his- sions and internhti0nal confer- enees Your Excellency is in a Ietter positlon than many oth- ers to judge how far the present results Obtained by the ilers of the nations eoneerning the fun- damentals of a secure and last- ing peace have satisfied er de- luded the legitimate expctat|ons of humanity," the Pontiff told China's envoy. "It is because we notice that Your Excellency, an authority in postwar international questions, affirms principles of brotherhood and love among nations as indis- pensable factors of international justice," he noted, "that our hope increases "that such sentiments be ealized and that they may over- come the opposing forces that aim at preventing or delaying the ad- vent of a true pece." Y.. L i. Initiate Twenty-two VANCOUVER, Feb. 19.--St. James Institute of the Y. L. I. met last Friday in the parish hall with the president, Mrs. Lillian Orth- mann presiding. Highlight of the evening was the Tnitiation of 22 candidates. Miss Madalon Babcock, presi- dent of the newly organized Past Presidents Club announced a party on April 11 to be gwen for all who transferred from associate to beneficial membership. Plans were also made to assist with the USO work being carried on at Barnes Hospital. Members were addressed 'by Miss Mable Barlow. district deputy from Seattle, Wash., and by Mrs. Helen Hanson, institute deputy from Portland. The Roy. Connor McGreevy, Rev. Patrick McNerny and Roy. Joseph Vogel also talked briefly. Officers assisting the president in the nitiation ceremonies were the round trip by plane. Mrs. Delima Pechin. Miss Theresa Downey, Mrs. Dors %'astradowski, er and Mrs. Alice Granatir. Those serving on the flag team Pet sburg Altar for the initiation were: Miss Dor- othy Lechnit Miss Lucille Mad- SOciety [ntefiains Geo Hutchison Miss LaVern Muench, iss Anne Was- tradowski and Miss Claire M. Wrangell Group 955 mpire Bldg. Seattle 4, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for King County By MONICA FINN In Probate. PETERSBURG, AlaSka, Feb. 15 In the Matter of the Estate of Albert M. Berger, Deeeased.--No. 100734--- Last Week end the members of Notice to Creditors. Notice is hereby gven that the un- the Petersburg Altar Society of dersigned has been appointed and has St. Catherine's C h u r c h w e r e qualified as Administratrix of the es- tate of Albert M. Burger. Deceased; hostesses to the Altar Society of that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby required to W'angell. The.group of 10 mum- ser4e the same. duly verified, on said b.rs came to Petersburg on Sat- Hazel B. Burger or her attorneys of] record at the address below stated, I lTday" on the RADAR owned by and file the same with t!e ?/irk oo Mr. Lee Ellls. The w0men were said Court, together xvt p I such service within six months after l enttained at dinndr at the the date of first publication of this no-I American Legion Hall at :30 tlee, or the same will be barred. [ First publication February 14, 1947.[ p. m. A short business meeting HAZEL B. BERGER. Administratrix followed the dinner. The evening of said Estate. Address 955 Empire Bldg.. Seattle 4. Wash." was spent playing bingo and pinG- STUNTZ & HICKS. Attorneys for Es- tate. 955 Empire Bldg., Seattle, 4. chle. The prizes were won by Mrs. Wash. Wonders and Mrs. Nolan of Final Publication, March 7. 1947. wrangell. Mrs. Ray Sembe{-g and PATRICK A. GERAGITY Mrs. Norman Guthrie of Peters- SGS Empire Bldg. Seattle 4. Wash. burg were in charge of the ar- IN THE SUPERIOR COURr OF THE State of Washington for King County rangements for the dinner. --In Probate. On Sunday at l0 a. m.. the In the Matter of the Estate of Rose S. Aekerman. Deceased.--No. 100999. Wrangell choir joined the Peters- --Notice to Creditors. burg choir in the ngin of a Notice is hereby ven that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has Hgh M-ass wh:'ch Was offered bv oualified as Executor of the estate of Wr. Hoch. The Altar boy from Ro" S. Ackerman. Deceased; fhat all per!":-s having claims against said de- Wangell served the Mass. eeasod are hereby required to serve the same. duly verified, on said Ex- The following Altar Society eeutor or his attorney of record al the mombers came from Wrangell: address below stated, and file the same Mrs. Ronald Schwartz. pres- with the Clerk of said Court, toether with proof of such service within six months after the date of first publica-, ident; Mi-s. race Millis. secre- tion of this nolice, or the same will be I tarv: Mrs. Erhma Case. Mrs. Jus- barred. to Herriadez, Mrs. John Everson. FirCt p.b]icafion February 14, 1947. 1 CYRIL H. ACKERMAN, Execntor of Mrs. Bertha Christiansen, Mi.s said Estate. Address 865 Empire| Building'. Seattle. Wash. Marie Mullins. Miss OrDha Rag- PATRICK A. GERAGHTY. Attorney t lin, Mrs. Guggenbickler. Mrs. for Estate. 865 Empire Building. Se- attic. Wash W6nders, and Irs. Roy Nolan. Final PublicatiOn. March 7. 1947. Power flows through Puget Sound Giafit cables laid Puget Sound bring power to the Olympic Peninsula - and the great Bremerton Navy Yards. They stretch from Rich- mond Beach to Presi- ........ ddht's Poinma di-* tance of over four - -miles. Another of the Iitt[e known, but ira- ' p0rtant items in the investment value of a large power System. Easter 'is on the way  Turn your thoughts to i. Easter with emphasis on new clothes for you and the family, and thoughtful_Easter gifts for loved ones ..... Then turn to Rhodes for yourselection. - Second at Union MAin 8000 1, HOMe,OWNeO .o. Fr. ffConnor Attends Federal Housing Meet In Juneau 2UNEAU, Fb. 14. The Rev. Paul C. O'Connor, S.J., pastor of Hooper Bay is in Juneau to at- tend a meeting of the Federal Housing AdminiStration board ot Which he is a meifiber. Father O'C6nnor has ,authored a number of books and many maga- zine articles. His versatile pen has helped support the missions he has personally sei-ved in the North- 1,and. Iis lats bb0k, "Eskimo Parish," came off the Bruce Pub- lishing c0miany's {-esse early this ye/r. It !s .a thrilling account of the :_klaska Missioner's adven- tures with ae Innuit Eskimos to Wiom he was priest, doctor and cherished friend. English Diocese To Build 40 Schools LONDON. (NC)--Forty mod- ern schools are scheduled to be built in the Southwark diocese, covering south-east England and London South of the river "ITlames, Lo meet the demands of the edu- cational reforms legalized in the Education Act of 1944. VISIT sons AT ST. 5IARTIN W'ENATCHEIiI--Mr. and Mrs. 3oe Monda and Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Abair, spent the week end at st. Martin College, at Lacey, vis- iting with their sons Joe and George Monde and Joe Abair. JON L. FITZPATRICK, 1706 Smith Tower, Seattle, Wshington IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for the County of King. In Probate. In the matter of the Estate of Mary A. Schellin, deceased.--No. 100952.--No- tice to Creditors. Notice is hereby given that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as Executor of the estate of Mary A. Schellin, Deceased, that all persons having claims against sald de- ceased are hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Albert Schellin, Executor,or hls attorney of record at the address below sthted, and file the same with the Clerk of said Court, together with proo of Such ervice within ix m0nths after the date of first publication of this notice, or the same will be barred. Date of First pubIication February 21, 1947. ALBERT SCHELLIN, Executor of said Estate. Address: 1706 Smith Tover. Seatqe, Washington. JOHN L. FITZPATRICK. Attorney for Estate, 1706 Smith Tower. Seattle, Washington. Final publication March 7. 1947. HOME LOANS' -To refinance, buy, build or improve* G.I. LOAN -- FHA LOANS Prudential Savings & Loan Association STEPHEN S. SELAK, Pres. Third Ave. & Spring MAin 3200 i i  i i e O . -- _ . . Friciay ebma21, i9 7 =C A T'HO'L:I-C NOR T H"E S T P'ROG R ES S " .......  ............................................... ? ..................... ,,' tii'T I i % .................... f ....... f .... Ii "-''f'-T ......................................... ............................... il  " " Honor Gel00IOn Cardina! In N.Y. Cathedral PrelQt F eale! Opposed. Nazism In its Stronghold (N.C.W.C. News Service NEW YORK, Feb. 17 " Wel- comed as '-'an outstanding defend- er of man's God-given rights" and as "a hero for our Holy Faith," His Eminence Konrad Cardinal yon Preysing, Bishop of Berlin, was present in the sanctuary at solemn Mass yesterday in St. Pat- lic-k Cathedral, here. His Emin- ence Francis Cardinal Spe!Iman, Archbishop of New York, presided at the Mass at wh;ch a congrega- tioh bf 4,500 assisted. In the eve- ning, the visiting prelate was fet- ed at a public reception in the Cathedral Girls' High School aud- itorium. Cardinal yon Preysing occupied a red brocade throne erected on the Epistle side in the sanctuary. The German prelate, whose fear- less attacks upon nazism during its hey-day in its own stronghold won him world-wide renown, was welcomed to the Cathedral by Msgr. Joseph F. Flannelly, admin- istrator. "As Ainerieans," Monsignor Flannelly told the Cardinal in his welcome, "we at% delighted to regard you as an Outstanding defender of man's Ggd-given rights. AS Catholics, your pres- ence brings us joy because we esteem you as a hero for our Holy Faith. We thank God for the example of steadfastness in the Faith which He has provid- ed for us in you." James A. Farley formei  Post-l - ' . " - I master General, presided at the I reception. Cardinal spe|Iman inTI troduced Cardinal yon Preysing I and the speakers included Theo- I bold Dengler, New York attorney, I who only recently completed a mission with the merican Mili- tary Governme'nt in Germany. The Cardinal Bisrlop of Berlin in his response to the acclaim at the reception, said his primary motive for visiting the United States was to personally express the pro- found gratitude of his people "for the generous and marvelous char- ity of all Americans." He said it was an example of charity "that knows no bounds and excludes no one and is restoring to a discour- Berlin Cardinal 00EFENSE 00EM$ TO RAft iTS DAY 1N Arrives Wearing oR, TISO'S TSAL .Tiara of Worrie . (Special C0rrepondefit, N.C.W.C.. dP I ]JRATIeLAVv: er-Vsioee)ia, Feb. (Continued from Page 1) In the over-all picture there is 17 eRo) "As long as I am ,an absolute lack of fuel, thou-lpresient, nobody in Sldvakia Will sands of families being without be %6hdmned 'to death." anJ the b!ycle tires by his priests -rio lump 0 coal- hundreds of I Thi-s staOeient made in 1942 by are badly needed by all his people, to sbrve their Wollen parlshes in the outlying sections of hts see. H Eminence praises warmly and gratefully the extensive aid rehdered by War Relief Services National Catholic Welfare Con- ference, the CARE food packages and the assistance of the Bishop's War Emergency and Relief Com- mittee. "I have come"to America," he told me, "to thank the American people for all they have done and all they ake doing to aid my peo- ple. I t is. part also of my purpose to toll them omethihg of the misery and Want in Europe, Ger- many, epeciall Bhrlin, that their genorosity is helping to alleviate." I?,=stributed (Jhmstmas PfiJekags Peoill Last Christmas, :His Eminence related, he received a hundred CARE packages 9 f food from Archbishop John T. McN{cholas, O. i., of Cincinnati, Chairman of h e N.C.W.C. Administrative Board, and these he distri'buted personally as ar as they rould go, making each package serve a number of families. "I can't desc{ibe for you," he said, "the joy t brought, even when each_ package was divided among many beneficiaries. Wid- ows, with children and ol d people were the ones I made a special ef- fort to assist. The people wer e .quite 5slde themselves with happiness to receive a little but- {er, a iltti ,heat." Shoeso ireiy Nil Th lack of ho, and iJarticu- larly 1:he lack of Sols for uppers, pres'ets a Special prob!em.  The people made out Well enough while the weather was mild, but now that Europe i s e.xeriencing one of the worst winters in years, it is another matter, the Ca{'dinal s.ald. The people can not ,venture out of their homes, some of 'hich are crude shelters indeed. They cannot go to church; the children cannot attend school, and the priests experience the utlost dif- ficulty attending to their paro- chial duties. Yes, he added, shoes are a great need. tire Rev. Dr..J6eph Tiso, former[ president bf he ar time puppet[ Slovak.Rgime, "vlen a mother en--[ treated him .in ehalf of her son I whb had :been ffnddned to death[ for rehso by a lovak court, was recalled at the trial Of Dr. Tiso thousands of, persons are Without anything approximat:ng adequate shelter; w a r n: clothing and blankets are sorely ne.edd; hospi- t'als are heated but part time, and there is general undernourish- ment. 2he Cardinal said that 17 of trio lal-ge churches in hts Berlin dio- ch'e have been t0t|ly destroyed and a d0.en or mre have been badly damaged, briers have sut- lured lesshr detucti6n and many small chtpels have been reduced to i'uins. Th Cardinal makes it plain that he speaks chiefly about Bec- lin becat=e it is a Situation with which he is mbst familiar. But, he hasteiis to add, the piCtUre there is not much differeht fiom what it is in most large cities of Ger- manj,, and in fact in all of war- tbrn Europe. "T6day, more than ever before," he said, "America has become a land of iope and promise for the Weary people Of the Old World." New Ybrk was a source o{ con- ,tant amazement to Cardinal yon Pr'eysing on his first day in the United States He tasted the first ilk he had had in two years, found the tall bUildings, magn::fi- cent bridges and broad roadwaj/s the Veribable "fairyland" he had been told it Would be. But it was, perhaps, the whole- ness of the clty and the vigor of its busy life the{ impressecl hirfi most. He said he could not get over the experience of driving through a city without shattered windows and mere shells of houses to be viewed on every side. When the wheels of the Amer- ican commercial airplane touched the ground of the New York field. after some 30 hours of flight, Cardinal Spellman was on hand to greet the distinguished visitor. With Cardinal Spellman were Archbishop J. Francis A. McIn- tyro, Coadjutor of New York; and the Roy. Paul F. Tanner, Assist- ant General Secretary of the N.C.W.C., who is accompanying Cardinal yon Preysing on his visit to various Ameri.can cities. lefore the Slovak National Cou here. The former Slovak presi- dent, is being t/:ied with several of his War-time ininisters, on 113 separate charges, each of which :err:us the death penalty. A 27-year:Oll soldier, whose life I Dr. Tiso spared by commuting the death Sentence to life mprison- mont. appea;ed as a witness at the !atter's trial, if'he defense counsel was also n possession of aletter frbm the "soldier's mother relat- ing how her Son's life was spared but the court refdsed the defense's request to have it read. Tells of Nhzi Pressure 'Th defense also "gMned from te'stmOny Of Dr. Mai'tin Sokol, the fore-nor president of Slovak Parlia- ment. Dr. Sokol, who w/s recently re- leased by the Russians to appear at the trial, had taken an active part in the secret preparations for reconstructing Czechosl o v a k i a. While making it clear at the be- ginning of his testimony that there had never _beeii much friendship between himself and Dr. Tiso. he testified that the former presi- dent, whom he described as hav- ing been under constant and heavy pressure from the nazis, on several occasions intervened to prevent German brutalities. When the court stated that Dr Tlso must have been willing to accept re- sponsibility for the German atroci- ties in Slovakia and if not Willing he should have resigned, Dr. Sokol declared that such a resignation would have brought Slovakia even greater harm. POOgE SUPPRESS HUNGARIAN BISHOPS' PASTORAL LETTERS ROME -- (CIP) Cardinal aged and despairing continent its ] Mindszenty, Archbishop o Eszt- .... ergom and Primate of ;Hungary, faith and hope." ]f"  III /'  * " .CardiIl yon ]Prey.sing s00id. : h Wrlm* protestetl in a recent kddress in Ii 1 LllLIi I.  Budpa est against th d'sres, pee'hlS.Seeondary purpose m coming to the U. S. was to acquaint tile |   . u ,. . , , | for religious liberty shown ny the Pedestal, But P00cture Not rope generally. - |  -  a i    , Two pastoral letters Of the "Unless you have seen with your a, ll ] l/-I,, % NIl Hungarian Hierarchy, the Card- own eyes," the Cardinal said, "and ,!1 I.llll dK]7J I %. IIt,l inal declared, could not be pub- lived for years, as I have, in the fished because of a prohibition by midst of misery and squalor, it is difficult to realize fully the extent arid the severity of the tragedy which has befallen much o] Eu- rope. Some of the damage is b e- yond hope of repair; no one can zecall to life the millions of dead of all countries; no one can take away the emptiness and pain from the hearts of orphans, widows and Other bereaved survivors. Against hhis tragic background each single act of mercy shown to the sick and the dying, the starving an`d the shelterless, becomes something doubly precious and meritorious. Blessed indeed are the merciful. Since the war, Am. erica, more than ever before, has become a land of hope and promise for the weary people of the Old WOrld." MONTANA PRIEST BENEFIGIARY OF HALF MILLION WiLL PEORIA, ,Ill., Feb. 19.--The Rev. Frank J. Burns of Missoula, Mont., former Navy Chaplain, has been named principal beneficiary of an estate estimated at $500,000. The will of :4Iiss Agnes ThuG Thewlis, aged 86. was filed in probate court here this week. Father Burns recently returned to the Helena Diocese from duty with the U. S, Navy. The area of Continental United States in square miles is 3,738,393. (Continued from Page 1) ;gate, singing the familiar hymns of home parishes. just finished, they had .a force- If sometimes during the war ful incentive, now lacking, to GI Joe was painted in impossibly keep right with God. bight colors, he should not be Good Example Still 1M[arehes  poi-trayed in all-dark hues now. But good example {ill marches tip the aisle i.n an Amehcah Uni-[ form. in Tientsin lately, soe 800 Ik- rines attended the Week's mission conducted by Father R.bgiS Boule, C.P., of Pittsburgh, former. . Navy. chaplai now superio r 9 f the laS - sionist h6use in Peiping. Weekday noon and afternoon Masses in downtown Tokyo's Army-occupied bhildins are poor- ly attended, outside Lent. But in regularity an1 high percentage of daily commuflicarits, those little congregations, which include of- ficers, enlisted men anl civilians, are always impressive. Ever evening soldiers kneel for night prayers in tile Chapel of 1st Cavalry Division headquarters, T6kyo. General In Chblr Seou! , Korea,. offers an .impre.s- sire spectacle every Sunday morn- thg as Arneriah h01dirs climb the Stps, and jeetis tifi'd tff cars xoll up the steep incline" to the cathedral. I noticed that. smiling Father Thomas Robertson, chap- lain from Bt. piiul, hn., wore his hat)piest smiles as he Witched his GI congregation ei-6Vdihg !n for that 9 o'cl0'ck Mass. In the choir, c0nductd by Fahhr J-e{-dme Sweeney of St. Colun4Oan's mis- sions, you Wbu|l se G4ii. Archi- bald V. Arnold beside a buck pri- VNCOUVE Hamilton's Funeral Home RAY O. ANDREWS PAUL L. MYLAN Especially Equipped for Cath0ile Funerals 802 IV. llih Vancouver, Wash. Telephone 1157 Certainly. the Communist-inspired "demonstrations" against him in a few Chinese 'cities are unfair to him .and ciuite unrepi-esentative ot the Chinese people. GI Joe, whether a slightly be- wildered lad of 18 or a battle- wise re-enlistee of 24, is, as Gen- eral MacArthur has said, largely what his home traihing has made him. That training incIudes his school, companions, movies, ann magazines as well as his mother's teaching. His present circumstan- ces can press dangerously on Weak spots left unfortified by that training or produced by it. Thus S0*he oldiers of a victorious army met moral defeat. I rente-mlaer only two Gl's v'hbse names were really Joe. One, t red-head from Anstin, hrm., was a daffy eommumcant iii TRyo. So was the other. He wetit tick to Cincinnati, some months ago, to enter a iiovltit. Hdagafian Cardidal these authorities. AlmOst all Catholic activities, he stated, re- quire advance permission rom the police; religious processions, for instance, are allowed only if a special authorization is obtained- Although in the Hungarian elec- tions the moderate Smallholc[ers Party obtained a substantial ma- jority of votes, many key posts in the governm'ent are held by Communistists w h o owe their power to the Russian occupation army. HUNGARihN COURT SENTENCES BISHOP I BUDAPEST, Feb. 18.--(Radio,, NCI Bishop Stephen Zadravecz, O. F. M., Titular of Dometiopolis, has been sentenced to a four-year prison term as the aftermath of' his scond" trial since the end of the ar before a Hungarian Pc0-, pie's Court. Previously the pre- late had ]seen tried and sentenced to a 5%-year term which later was annulled by a court of ap- peals. The trial of the 62-year-old pre- late had been followed with great interest by the people of this city, Direct Plea To where many regard him as a hero. S Large crowds of admirers flocked P00esident Truman it the hearings and many knelt i to receive his blessing as he en- tered and left the court room. BUDAPEST. Feb. 17 (Rad:,o.- VIUE-CAMERLENGO DIES NC)-His Em:ncnce Joseph Cardi- VATICAN CITY. Feb. 18. (Ra- nal Mindszen{y, Primate of Hun-idio, NC} Archbishop Tito Troc- giry, has sent a cable to Presi-!chi. and Vice-Camerlengo of the tent Harry Truman and King I Holy Roman Church, has died George VI of England pleading]here at the age of 82. He was or- the case of the 700,000 Hungar- dained in 1887 and consecrated in i ans being deported from Slovakia. 1915. Previously the Cardinal had made i svel-al public statements deplor- I JO H NbfL. FITZPAtRiCK Smitli Tower, ing the inhumane eircumstahces] Seattle 4, Washington in Which the deportations were be- IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for the County ing carried out. of King.--In Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of James Crdinal Mindszenty had also Ward. deeeased.--No. 101148.--Notice to Creditors. issued ,i lette rhqdcst!ng the in- I Notice is hereby given that the un- habitants of Budapest to hold de-dez'signed has been appointed and has votions in honor of the Holy Eu- qualified as Executor of the estate of James Ward. deceased, tliat all persons charist on the day that Hungary having claims against said deceased are signs the peace treaty, and to hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Executor or his keep a watch before the relic of iattorney of xecord at the address be- the right bahd of St. Stephen, low stated, and file the same with t.._ ' t Clerk of said Cotwt, together with king and patron of Hungary. proof of such service within e.x months after the date of first publica- tion of this notice, or the same will be JUNEAU LEAGU O barred. . i:I. MEET, SUNDAY Frt ,hlicalion February 21. 1947 1 REVEREND.E.J. McFADDEN. Execut-I JUNEAU--The League of the or of said Etpte. Address: 1706 Smith ] Tower. Seattle 4. Wash. ] Sacred Heart will meet in the JOHN L. FITZPATRICK, Attorney fog church after benediction at 8 p. m. ' Estate, ]706 Smith Tower, Seattle 4. ! Wash . . ] Sunday, Fcb. 23. Final publication March 7, 1947. :.New Ordiner00 Most Rev. Geqrge Joseph Don- nblly, AuxiliaiT Bishop of St. Louis since 140, who. has been named BiShop of the Diocese of Leavenwortfi, guns. Born in Ma- plewoocl, Mo., in. 1889 h was or- dained in 1921 and e6nsecrated St. Louip in 1940. Photo y Belkeh (NC Pllotoa) i:R, O*i00EiLLY-AMONG THOSE TAKEN OFF S, NORTH SEA "Ihe Rev. Patrick J. O'Reilly, S. J., 75-year-old veteran of mis- sion work in Alaska and the Northwest, was among the 86 passengers taken off the S. S. North Sea, Friday morning, when the Seattle-bound ship Which went aground near Belle Bella, B. C. Father O'Reilly was en route from Ketchikan to Portland to re- ceive a new assignment in mis- sionary work. He had been serv- ing as pastor at Sitka. Father O'Reilly is reported none the worse for his experiences and now resting at the Jesuit Noviti- ate, Sherican, Ore. Ship Moved Hospital The North Sea, on which Father O'Reilly sailed from Ketchikan, had been chartered, the first of this month, to move the Govern- merit Sanitarium for Indians from Skagway to Sitka. The Sisters of St. Ann have, been in charge Of the Sanitaxium for many years. The ship moved the Indian pati- ents. sisters and other personnel and hospital equipment in one trip. The sanitarium now is established at Sitka in buildings formerly used by U. S. armed forces. Fr, Albutt, Juneau Pastor00 Is Guest of Seattle Serra Club The Rev. Clifford Albutt, S.J., pastor of the Catholic Church in juneau, Was a guest 5f the Seattle Serra Club at its luncheon meet- ing, Friday, in the Go,n-nan Ho- tel. Father Albutt assisted in or- ganizing the Fairbanks Serra Club when he was stationed in that city. Father Albutt returned to Ju- neau, Saturday. He was in Seattle a few days on 'busines and made China's Envoy Welcomed By ffoly Father " _  none." His Holi- "It is a gesture of pm'ticular consideration which will not-only be appreciated. ,n all its import- ance by the entire Catholic world," he continued. "but above all it will be greeted by the 'Catholics of China with profound satisfaction and lively gratitude' Dr. Wu, in presenting his cre- dentials, had spoken of fhe ser- ious duties that now face man- kind, and the Holy Father com- mented on this by saylng that "there is na plaee, where such a statement could find a truer echo than in the house ef the father of Christianity, who cher- ishes an equal benevolence for all peoples,, regardless of any limitations of time and space, or nrigin and language, of race and culture." "Today," he added, "discord and conflicting interests still divide the nations a tragic consequence of the dreadful war. But in every country the more noble, farseeing and mature minds have learned in the school of suffer:.ng m the re- cent pa,t that despite all their differences they "have a common element so essential that no one can tamper with it without im- periling the very foundations and prosperity of his own people." "As an outstanding jurist and member of legislative co,m-his- sions and internhti0nal confer- enees Your Excellency is in a Ietter positlon than many oth- ers to judge how far the present results Obtained by the ilers of the nations eoneerning the fun- damentals of a secure and last- ing peace have satisfied er de- luded the legitimate expctat|ons of humanity," the Pontiff told China's envoy. "It is because we notice that Your Excellency, an authority in postwar international questions, affirms principles of brotherhood and love among nations as indis- pensable factors of international justice," he noted, "that our hope increases "that such sentiments be ealized and that they may over- come the opposing forces that aim at preventing or delaying the ad- vent of a true pece." Y.. L i. Initiate Twenty-two VANCOUVER, Feb. 19.--St. James Institute of the Y. L. I. met last Friday in the parish hall with the president, Mrs. Lillian Orth- mann presiding. Highlight of the evening was the Tnitiation of 22 candidates. Miss Madalon Babcock, presi- dent of the newly organized Past Presidents Club announced a party on April 11 to be gwen for all who transferred from associate to beneficial membership. Plans were also made to assist with the USO work being carried on at Barnes Hospital. Members were addressed 'by Miss Mable Barlow. district deputy from Seattle, Wash., and by Mrs. Helen Hanson, institute deputy from Portland. The Roy. Connor McGreevy, Rev. Patrick McNerny and Roy. Joseph Vogel also talked briefly. Officers assisting the president in the nitiation ceremonies were the round trip by plane. Mrs. Delima Pechin. Miss Theresa Downey, Mrs. Dors %'astradowski, er and Mrs. Alice Granatir. Those serving on the flag team Pet sburg Altar for the initiation were: Miss Dor- othy Lechnit Miss Lucille Mad- SOciety [ntefiains Geo Hutchison Miss LaVern Muench, iss Anne Was- tradowski and Miss Claire M. Wrangell Group 955 mpire Bldg. Seattle 4, Wash. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for King County By MONICA FINN In Probate. PETERSBURG, AlaSka, Feb. 15 In the Matter of the Estate of Albert M. Berger, Deeeased.--No. 100734--- Last Week end the members of Notice to Creditors. Notice is hereby gven that the un- the Petersburg Altar Society of dersigned has been appointed and has St. Catherine's C h u r c h w e r e qualified as Administratrix of the es- tate of Albert M. Burger. Deceased; hostesses to the Altar Society of that all persons having claims against said deceased are hereby required to W'angell. The.group of 10 mum- ser4e the same. duly verified, on said b.rs came to Petersburg on Sat- Hazel B. Burger or her attorneys of] record at the address below stated, I lTday" on the RADAR owned by and file the same with t!e ?/irk oo Mr. Lee Ellls. The w0men were said Court, together xvt p I such service within six months after l enttained at dinndr at the the date of first publication of this no-I American Legion Hall at :30 tlee, or the same will be barred. [ First publication February 14, 1947.[ p. m. A short business meeting HAZEL B. BERGER. Administratrix followed the dinner. The evening of said Estate. Address 955 Empire Bldg.. Seattle 4. Wash." was spent playing bingo and pinG- STUNTZ & HICKS. Attorneys for Es- tate. 955 Empire Bldg., Seattle, 4. chle. The prizes were won by Mrs. Wash. Wonders and Mrs. Nolan of Final Publication, March 7. 1947. wrangell. Mrs. Ray Sembe{-g and PATRICK A. GERAGITY Mrs. Norman Guthrie of Peters- SGS Empire Bldg. Seattle 4. Wash. burg were in charge of the ar- IN THE SUPERIOR COURr OF THE State of Washington for King County rangements for the dinner. --In Probate. On Sunday at l0 a. m.. the In the Matter of the Estate of Rose S. Aekerman. Deceased.--No. 100999. Wrangell choir joined the Peters- --Notice to Creditors. burg choir in the ngin of a Notice is hereby ven that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has Hgh M-ass wh:'ch Was offered bv oualified as Executor of the estate of Wr. Hoch. The Altar boy from Ro" S. Ackerman. Deceased; fhat all per!":-s having claims against said de- Wangell served the Mass. eeasod are hereby required to serve the same. duly verified, on said Ex- The following Altar Society eeutor or his attorney of record al the mombers came from Wrangell: address below stated, and file the same Mrs. Ronald Schwartz. pres- with the Clerk of said Court, toether with proof of such service within six months after the date of first publica-, ident; Mi-s. race Millis. secre- tion of this nolice, or the same will be I tarv: Mrs. Erhma Case. Mrs. Jus- barred. to Herriadez, Mrs. John Everson. FirCt p.b]icafion February 14, 1947. 1 CYRIL H. ACKERMAN, Execntor of Mrs. Bertha Christiansen, Mi.s said Estate. Address 865 Empire| Building'. Seattle. Wash. Marie Mullins. Miss OrDha Rag- PATRICK A. GERAGHTY. Attorney t lin, Mrs. Guggenbickler. Mrs. for Estate. 865 Empire Building. Se- attic. Wash W6nders, and Irs. Roy Nolan. Final PublicatiOn. March 7. 1947. Power flows through Puget Sound Giafit cables laid Puget Sound bring power to the Olympic Peninsula - and the great Bremerton Navy Yards. They stretch from Rich- mond Beach to Presi- ........ ddht's Poinma di-* tance of over four - -miles. Another of the Iitt[e known, but ira- ' p0rtant items in the investment value of a large power System. Easter 'is on the way  Turn your thoughts to i. Easter with emphasis on new clothes for you and the family, and thoughtful_Easter gifts for loved ones ..... Then turn to Rhodes for yourselection. - Second at Union MAin 8000 1, HOMe,OWNeO .o. Fr. ffConnor Attends Federal Housing Meet In Juneau 2UNEAU, Fb. 14. The Rev. Paul C. O'Connor, S.J., pastor of Hooper Bay is in Juneau to at- tend a meeting of the Federal Housing AdminiStration board ot Which he is a meifiber. Father O'C6nnor has ,authored a number of books and many maga- zine articles. His versatile pen has helped support the missions he has personally sei-ved in the North- 1,and. Iis lats bb0k, "Eskimo Parish," came off the Bruce Pub- lishing c0miany's {-esse early this ye/r. It !s .a thrilling account of the :_klaska Missioner's adven- tures with ae Innuit Eskimos to Wiom he was priest, doctor and cherished friend. English Diocese To Build 40 Schools LONDON. (NC)--Forty mod- ern schools are scheduled to be built in the Southwark diocese, covering south-east England and London South of the river "ITlames, Lo meet the demands of the edu- cational reforms legalized in the Education Act of 1944. VISIT sons AT ST. 5IARTIN W'ENATCHEIiI--Mr. and Mrs. 3oe Monda and Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Abair, spent the week end at st. Martin College, at Lacey, vis- iting with their sons Joe and George Monde and Joe Abair. JON L. FITZPATRICK, 1706 Smith Tower, Seattle, Wshington IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE State of Washington for the County of King. In Probate. In the matter of the Estate of Mary A. Schellin, deceased.--No. 100952.--No- tice to Creditors. Notice is hereby given that the un- dersigned has been appointed and has qualified as Executor of the estate of Mary A. Schellin, Deceased, that all persons having claims against sald de- ceased are hereby required to serve the same, duly verified, on said Albert Schellin, Executor,or hls attorney of record at the address below sthted, and file the same with the Clerk of said Court, together with proo of Such ervice within ix m0nths after the date of first publication of this notice, or the same will be barred. Date of First pubIication February 21, 1947. ALBERT SCHELLIN, Executor of said Estate. Address: 1706 Smith Tover. Seatqe, Washington. JOHN L. FITZPATRICK. Attorney for Estate, 1706 Smith Tower. Seattle, Washington. Final publication March 7. 1947. HOME LOANS' -To refinance, buy, build or improve* G.I. LOAN -- FHA LOANS Prudential Savings & Loan Association STEPHEN S. SELAK, Pres. Third Ave. & Spring MAin 3200 i i  i i